Braking surface on old tubular rims



R

ron

Guest
I recently picked up an old set of Campagnolo Victory Strada tubular rims.
I note that what would be the braking surface of these rims is unmachined
and narrow - the flat sidewall portion of the rim has a height of no more
than about 6mm. This surface is coated with what looks like the same
brown-gray coating (anodization or whatever) that is on the rest
of the rim. Does anyone know - was this intended as a braking surface, or
are these strictly for brakeless track use?

Ron Abramson
 
ron wrote:
> I recently picked up an old set of Campagnolo Victory Strada tubular rims.
> I note that what would be the braking surface of these rims is unmachined
> and narrow - the flat sidewall portion of the rim has a height of no more
> than about 6mm. This surface is coated with what looks like the same
> brown-gray coating (anodization or whatever) that is on the rest
> of the rim. Does anyone know - was this intended as a braking surface, or
> are these strictly for brakeless track use?
>
> Ron Abramson
>


Doubtful that Campy would label anything intended for track (pista) use
as Strada (road).
 
ron wrote:
> I recently picked up an old set of Campagnolo Victory Strada tubular rims.
> I note that what would be the braking surface of these rims is unmachined
> and narrow - the flat sidewall portion of the rim has a height of no more
> than about 6mm. This surface is coated with what looks like the same
> brown-gray coating (anodization or whatever) that is on the rest
> of the rim. Does anyone know - was this intended as a braking surface, or
> are these strictly for brakeless track use?
>
> Ron Abramson


Those rims predate the current craze for machined sidewalls. The
sidewalls are adequate for braking, but they would work better if they
weren't anodized- raw aluminum makes a better braking surface. You'll
find that braking will improve as the anodized layer wears away.

Jeff
 
ron wrote:
> I recently picked up an old set of Campagnolo Victory Strada tubular rims.
> I note that what would be the braking surface of these rims is unmachined
> and narrow - the flat sidewall portion of the rim has a height of no more
> than about 6mm. This surface is coated with what looks like the same
> brown-gray coating (anodization or whatever) that is on the rest
> of the rim. Does anyone know - was this intended as a braking surface, or
> are these strictly for brakeless track use?
>
> Ron Abramson


The braking surface works fine. I have a set of these I built up last
year, and while riding on a multi-use trail, a dog jumped out in front
of me. I braked hard, and wound up tearing a patch of tread off my rear
tire, a Panaracer Practice Dual Tourguard. Good thing the tire had a
kevlar belt, 'cause I was able to ride the last 15 miles home on
that...

BTW, My brakes are Ambrosio long reach with KS Salmon pads.
 
ron wrote:
> I recently picked up an old set of Campagnolo Victory Strada tubular rims.
> I note that what would be the braking surface of these rims is unmachined
> and narrow - the flat sidewall portion of the rim has a height of no more
> than about 6mm. This surface is coated with what looks like the same
> brown-gray coating (anodization or whatever) that is on the rest
> of the rim. Does anyone know - was this intended as a braking surface, or
> are these strictly for brakeless track use?
>
> Ron Abramson


Ya know, once upon a time, long, long ago, in a galaxy far, far
aw......

Rims like that 'used' to be the standard. Just use 'em, they'll be just
fine.
 
On 1/1/07 2:41 AM, in article
[email protected], "Hank Wirtz"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
> ron wrote:
>> I recently picked up an old set of Campagnolo Victory Strada tubular rims.
>> I note that what would be the braking surface of these rims is unmachined
>> and narrow - the flat sidewall portion of the rim has a height of no more
>> than about 6mm. This surface is coated with what looks like the same
>> brown-gray coating (anodization or whatever) that is on the rest
>> of the rim. Does anyone know - was this intended as a braking surface, or
>> are these strictly for brakeless track use?
>>
>> Ron Abramson

>
> The braking surface works fine. I have a set of these I built up last
> year, and while riding on a multi-use trail, a dog jumped out in front
> of me. I braked hard, and wound up tearing a patch of tread off my rear
> tire, a Panaracer Practice Dual Tourguard. Good thing the tire had a
> kevlar belt, 'cause I was able to ride the last 15 miles home on
> that...
>
> BTW, My brakes are Ambrosio long reach with KS Salmon pads.
>


The KS salmon pads was you problem.......
After I went through the dual compound ones I put the salmon ones on, that
came with the whole KS brake shoe package, they stopped TOO well!

I took them off so I would not create an accident either by myself or in a
pack....
 
ST wrote:
>
> The KS salmon pads was you problem.......
> After I went through the dual compound ones I put the salmon ones on, that
> came with the whole KS brake shoe package, they stopped TOO well!
>
> I took them off so I would not create an accident either by myself or in a
> pack....


The pads worked fine. They modulate well, and stop me effectively going
down a 10% grade at 30mph on a rainy day. The tread tore because I HAD
to go from 15 to 0 in about 10 feet. Anything less abrubpt, and I
would have hit that damned dog.
 
ron wrote:
> I recently picked up an old set of Campagnolo Victory Strada tubular rims.
> I note that what would be the braking surface of these rims is unmachined
> and narrow - the flat sidewall portion of the rim has a height of no more
> than about 6mm. This surface is coated with what looks like the same
> brown-gray coating (anodization or whatever) that is on the rest
> of the rim. Does anyone know - was this intended as a braking surface, or
> are these strictly for brakeless track use?


That's what rims all looked like for the first hundred years before rim
makers started cutting the sides. Non problem at all. Build. Ride.

Campagnolo rims have an oily antioxidant on them under the plastic
wrapper. Wash well with alcohol or something before building.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
"Hank Wirtz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> ST wrote:
> >
> > The KS salmon pads was you problem.......
> > After I went through the dual compound ones I put the salmon ones on,

that
> > came with the whole KS brake shoe package, they stopped TOO well!
> >
> > I took them off so I would not create an accident either by myself or

in a
> > pack....

>
> The pads worked fine. They modulate well, and stop me effectively going
> down a 10% grade at 30mph on a rainy day. The tread tore because I HAD
> to go from 15 to 0 in about 10 feet. Anything less abrubpt, and I
> would have hit that damned dog.
>


That's what Silca pumps with Campy 2 legged tips are for.... Anti cur
devices. ;-)

Chas.
 
A Muzi ha scritto:
> That's what rims all looked like for the first hundred years before rim
> makers started cutting the sides. Non problem at all. Build. Ride.


Nor shall you worry if the pads, being deeper than the rims, will not
wear evenly.

Sergio
Pisa
 
> A Muzi ha scritto:
>> That's what rims all looked like for the first hundred years before rim
>> makers started cutting the sides. Non problem at all. Build. Ride.


sergio wrote:
> Nor shall you worry if the pads, being deeper than the rims, will not
> wear evenly.


Also a common problem with cheap mountain bikes today.
When the pad wears leaving a lip, the brake pad hangs up under the rim
and won't return.
Simply trim the edge with a blade.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971