Breaking chain for fixed gear

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com, Apr 25, 2004.

  1. Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    links. However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).

    As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?

    Cam
     
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  2. [email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com wrote:

    > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    > the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    > links. However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    > links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).
    >
    > As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?


    A standard SRAM PC48 is fine if you're using 3/16" sprockets and chainrings.
     
  3. I've used SRAM/SuperLink QR links on both my tourer and my ATB for
    decades with no breakage problem, but fixie chains may be a special
    case.

    Break the chain anywhere with a chain tool. A chain is and endless,
    uniform circle, there is no correct or incorrect link to "break" on it.

    - -

    "May you have the wind at your back.
    And a really low gear for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner
    http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  4. Marcus Coles

    Marcus Coles Guest

    [email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com wrote:
    > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    > the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    > links. However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    > links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).
    >
    > As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?
    >
    > Cam
    >


    My fixed gear recently got a new Wippermann 152, 1/2" x 1/8", nickel
    plated, bushing type chain. $25 Canadian.

    It looks good and that alone inspires more confidence than the black $6
    generic BMX chain.

    According to the package it is intended for "citybikes, BMX, track and
    indoor sport" and "breaking load: 8.200 Newton".
    Since I weigh 200lbs and stand on the pedals, this last one has me a
    little worried, but I'm hoping it's a dot thousands rather than a
    decimal point.
    I joined it with the supplied old style 3 piece spring clip master link.

    I have about four hundred kilometers on it in mostly clean dry
    conditions and have not broken it YET.

    Marcus
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 16:28:15 GMT, [email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com may
    have said:

    >Where should one break a chain for fixed gear.


    There is neither a right nor a wrong point if the chain is not
    presently connectd using a master link.

    > My LBS advised me not to use
    >the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    >links.


    If the lbs is selling weak quick links, they should find better ones.
    I have never had a strength-related connector link failure with a
    single-speed chain in 40 years of riding bikes. (I've had a couple of
    the old-style ones become unclipped because of stuff hitting them and
    knocking the spring clip off, but that's a different matter, and less
    of a concern with the SRAM-style links.) Remember, regardless of the
    fact that it's being used on a fixie, the load is always in the same
    direction as far as the link is concerned, and unless the chainline is
    running at an angle, the load is much more even than on a
    derailleur-equipped bike. I would expect no more trouble with the
    chain on a fixie than on any other bike, despite the fact that it's in
    motion continuously when the bike is moving. If you don't learn to
    modulate your leg action to avoid wasting power while riding, you'll
    wear *yourself* out before you wear out the chain.

    >However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    >links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).


    A valid but in my opinion often overstated concern in this instance,
    and part of the reason why the SRAM connectors are favored so widely.
    On a single-speed setup, the side forces should not be present which
    would tend to hasten failure due to pin looseness, so it's probably
    less of a concern than on multispeeds. Since I've always used
    connector links on replacement single-speeds of mine, I've never had
    to worry about it.

    >As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?


    I'll second the nomination of the SRAM PC48.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  6. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    <[email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    > the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    > links. However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    > links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).


    Your LBS needs a little enlightening. The load on a fixed gear chain is much
    less than a mountain bike chain. Chain tension is related to gear ratio.

    > As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?


    SRAM PC-48.
     
  7. B.C. Cletta

    B.C. Cletta Guest

    [email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    > the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    > links. However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    > links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).


    i think your 'LBS' should be your 'fLBS', former LBS. all these
    special chain issues deal w/ those created by the HyperGlide shift
    pattern on the sprockets that rip the chain apart.

    > As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?


    i'm getting good service w/ the KMC Z410(?), 8-USD. quiet unless
    it needs a lube. it may be a full bushing, i forget.
     
  8. On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 16:28:15 +0000, Cam wrote:

    > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    > the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    > links.


    Bullshit. Even if it is, these are certainly strong enough. Remember
    that some fat ol' guy struggling up a hill in his mountain bike, in his
    granny, exerts more stress on the chain than Marty Nothstein in a sprint.
    (Hint: It's because of the granny.) Lots of folks use these super-links
    with no trouble, No reason to believe you won't.

    > However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    > links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).


    Much more of a concern than the super-link is.

    I use Sram. Since I have a bunch of 1/8" sprockets, I use the 1/8"
    chain, the SR-1. $10-$15. If you have 3/32" sprockets and chainrings,
    use the 8-speed chain, it's cheaper.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a
    _`\(,_ | conclusion. -- George Bernard Shaw
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  9. On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 20:11:41 +0000, Marcus Coles wrote:

    > My fixed gear recently got a new Wippermann 152, 1/2" x 1/8", nickel
    > plated, bushing type chain. $25 Canadian.


    $25 -- even Canadian -- is a lot for a chain.

    > According to the package it is intended for "citybikes, BMX, track and
    > indoor sport" and "breaking load: 8.200 Newton".
    > Since I weigh 200lbs and stand on the pedals, this last one has me a
    > little worried,


    You are joking, I hope.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | This is my religion. There is no need for temples; no need for
    _`\(,_ | complicated philosophy. Our own brain, our own heart is our
    (_)/ (_) | temple. The philosophy is kindness. --The Dalai Lama
     
  10. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 20:11:41 +0000, Marcus Coles wrote:
    >
    >
    >>My fixed gear recently got a new Wippermann 152, 1/2" x 1/8", nickel
    >>plated, bushing type chain. $25 Canadian.

    >
    >
    > $25 -- even Canadian -- is a lot for a chain.
    >
    >
    >>According to the package it is intended for "citybikes, BMX, track and
    >>indoor sport" and "breaking load: 8.200 Newton".
    >>Since I weigh 200lbs and stand on the pedals, this last one has me a
    >>little worried,

    >
    >
    > You are joking, I hope.
    >


    Well, isn't 8.2 Newton pretty weak? 8,200 Newton is another story.

    Greg
     
  11. Phil Brown

    Phil Brown Guest

    >A standard SRAM PC48 is fine if you're using 3/16" sprockets and chainrings.

    I think you mean 3/32". That's standard derailleur chain. Track chainwheels and
    cogs take either 1/8" or 3/32".
    Phil Brown
     
  12. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    [email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com wrote:

    > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    > the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    > links. However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    > links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).
    >
    > As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?



    Any 1/8 BMX chain, under $10 and use the supplied snaplink.
    People want to make this difficult/mysterious but it is not.
    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  13. Marcus Coles

    Marcus Coles Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 20:11:41 +0000, Marcus Coles wrote:
    >
    >
    >>My fixed gear recently got a new Wippermann 152, 1/2" x 1/8", nickel
    >>plated, bushing type chain. $25 Canadian.

    >
    >
    > $25 -- even Canadian -- is a lot for a chain.
    >

    Not for a shiny chain :), for comparison I think my last yucky black
    genuine Shimano 9 speed chain cost me $19.00 at the LBS.
    >
    >>According to the package it is intended for "citybikes, BMX, track and
    >>indoor sport" and "breaking load: 8.200 Newton".
    >>Since I weigh 200lbs and stand on the pedals, this last one has me a
    >>little worried,

    >
    >
    > You are joking, I hope.
    >

    Yeah, IIRC 8.200 Newton is something less than 80lbs force.
    I think the change to the use of the comma to define thousands did not
    happen during translation to english for the packaging text.

    Marcus
     
  14. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On 4/25/04 3:52 PM, in article [email protected], "A Muzi"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com wrote:
    >
    >> Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not to use
    >> the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less than regular
    >> links. However, with new chains, I worry about the integrity of rejoined
    >> links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).
    >>
    >> As an aside, can anyone recommend a good economy chain for fixies?

    >
    >
    > Any 1/8 BMX chain, under $10 and use the supplied snaplink.
    > People want to make this difficult/mysterious but it is not.


    That is it!!.....................The answer for the ??


    Whether you use "road pitch" or "track pitch" 1/8" (track) chains are
    strong, cheap and work great. They do make a little noise if you are running
    road pitch gears
     
  15. Peter Cole wrote:
    > <[email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not
    > > to use the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less
    > > than regular links. However, with new chains, I worry about the
    > > integrity of rejoined links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).

    >
    > Your LBS needs a little enlightening. The load on a fixed gear chain is
    > much less than a mountain bike chain. Chain tension is related to gear
    > ratio.


    I don't think this is entirely true. The torque about your rear axle is
    related to gear ratio, but your chain couldn't care less what the rear
    sprocket is (when considering tension anyway).
    The tension in the top run of chain is determined only by the ratio of
    your crank length to chainring diameter and the force applied to the pedal
    perpendicular to the crank.
     
  16. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 01:49:00 GMT, "Jacobe Hazzard"
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >Peter Cole wrote:
    >> <[email protected]*nospam*icantfeelmylegs.com> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > Where should one break a chain for fixed gear. My LBS advised me not
    >> > to use the proprietary quick link as it's breaking strength was less
    >> > than regular links. However, with new chains, I worry about the
    >> > integrity of rejoined links (ie. short pins with mushroomed heads).

    >>
    >> Your LBS needs a little enlightening. The load on a fixed gear chain is
    >> much less than a mountain bike chain. Chain tension is related to gear
    >> ratio.

    >
    >I don't think this is entirely true. The torque about your rear axle is
    >related to gear ratio, but your chain couldn't care less what the rear
    >sprocket is (when considering tension anyway).
    >The tension in the top run of chain is determined only by the ratio of
    >your crank length to chainring diameter and the force applied to the pedal
    >perpendicular to the crank.


    Yes, and the small ring on the typical mountain bike is *much* smaller
    than the ring on a fixed-gear bike, while the crank length is
    approximately the same. Assuming, then, that the rider is using the
    small gear because it's really needed, the tension on the chain is
    going to be much higher than it would be on a fixed-gear in the same
    circumstances.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  17. On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 01:49:00 +0000, Jacobe Hazzard wrote:

    > The tension in the top run of chain is determined only by the ratio of
    > your crank length to chainring diameter and the force applied to the pedal
    > perpendicular to the crank.


    That's right, but still your average weekend warrier climbing hard in his
    22-tooth granny gear is exerting a lot more force on that chain than a
    track racer, and the chain does not break.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not
    _`\(,_ | certain, and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to
    (_)/ (_) | reality. -- Albert Einstein
     
  18. B. C. Cletta wrote:

    > i'm getting good service w/ the KMC Z410(?), 8-USD. quiet unless
    > it needs a lube. it may be a full bushing, i forget.


    Nope, it's bushingless, unfortunately. That's what I'm using at the moment
    (too soon to rate it). Funny, it cost me $8 Canadian.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    Although the moon is smaller than the earth, it is farther away.
     
  19. On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 22:29:40 GMT, "G.T." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >David L. Johnson wrote:
    >> On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 20:11:41 +0000, Marcus Coles wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>My fixed gear recently got a new Wippermann 152, 1/2" x 1/8", nickel
    >>>plated, bushing type chain. $25 Canadian.

    >>
    >>
    >> $25 -- even Canadian -- is a lot for a chain.
    >>
    >>
    >>>According to the package it is intended for "citybikes, BMX, track and
    >>>indoor sport" and "breaking load: 8.200 Newton".
    >>>Since I weigh 200lbs and stand on the pedals, this last one has me a
    >>>little worried,

    >>
    >>
    >> You are joking, I hope.
    >>

    >
    >Well, isn't 8.2 Newton pretty weak? 8,200 Newton is another story.


    8.2 Newtons = 1.843 pound-force (lbf)

    Michael J. Klein
    Please replace mousepotato with asiancastings
     
  20. ZeeExSixAre

    ZeeExSixAre Guest

    Michael J. Klein wrote:
    > On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 22:29:40 GMT, "G.T." <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> David L. Johnson wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 20:11:41 +0000, Marcus Coles wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> My fixed gear recently got a new Wippermann 152, 1/2" x 1/8",
    >>>> nickel plated, bushing type chain. $25 Canadian.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> $25 -- even Canadian -- is a lot for a chain.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> According to the package it is intended for "citybikes, BMX, track
    >>>> and indoor sport" and "breaking load: 8.200 Newton".
    >>>> Since I weigh 200lbs and stand on the pedals, this last one has me
    >>>> a little worried,
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> You are joking, I hope.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Well, isn't 8.2 Newton pretty weak? 8,200 Newton is another story.

    >
    > 8.2 Newtons = 1.843 pound-force (lbf)
    >


    Have none of you seen the punctuation conventions of other countries? 8.200
    in all probability means 8,200. Some of you need to get out more.

    FYI - "foot-lbs"

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
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