Brined vs Koshered turkey



R

RLK

Guest
Does kosher turkey have the same texture as a natural turkey that's been
brined at home, when roasted?

I have been following the Cook's Illustrated technique for high roast turkey
for a few years now. Brine, butterfly and high roast in less than 2 hours
for a 12-14lb natural turkey. Quite excellent and juicy.

This holiday, we have a kosher turkey. I know it is unnecessary to brine a
kashered (sp?) turkey since it has been salted and drained but would like
to know if the kosher turkey may have a tendency to dry faster in the high
roasting process since it has not been immersed in "brine". Anything I can
do to ensure the juiciness. Or no need to worry?
 
S

Sheldon

Guest
RLK wrote:
> Does kosher turkey have the same texture as a natural turkey that's been
> brined at home, when roasted?
>
> I have been following the Cook's Illustrated technique for high roast turkey
> for a few years now. Brine, butterfly and high roast in less than 2 hours
> for a 12-14lb natural turkey. Quite excellent and juicy.
>
> This holiday, we have a kosher turkey. I know it is unnecessary to brine a
> kashered (sp?) turkey since it has been salted and drained but would like
> to know if the kosher turkey may have a tendency to dry faster in the high
> roasting process since it has not been immersed in "brine". Anything I can
> do to ensure the juiciness. Or no need to worry?


Kashering and brining are not synonymous... othwise all it would
require to convert to Judaism is to hack off the tip of your peepee and
take a dunk in the sea.
 
S

sarah bennett

Guest
Sheldon wrote:
> RLK wrote:
>
>>Does kosher turkey have the same texture as a natural turkey that's been
>>brined at home, when roasted?
>>
>>I have been following the Cook's Illustrated technique for high roast turkey
>>for a few years now. Brine, butterfly and high roast in less than 2 hours
>>for a 12-14lb natural turkey. Quite excellent and juicy.
>>
>>This holiday, we have a kosher turkey. I know it is unnecessary to brine a
>>kashered (sp?) turkey since it has been salted and drained but would like
>>to know if the kosher turkey may have a tendency to dry faster in the high
>>roasting process since it has not been immersed in "brine". Anything I can
>>do to ensure the juiciness. Or no need to worry?

>
>
> Kashering and brining are not synonymous... othwise all it would
> require to convert to Judaism is to hack off the tip of your peepee and
> take a dunk in the sea.
>


aside from the requisite studying, that *is* all you need to do (If you
are male)

--

saerah

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