British winter conditions

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Mark Manning, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. Mark Manning

    Mark Manning Guest

    I'm just back from an utterly *stonking* weekend in the western Lakes.
    I wore my crampons more than I have done since I went on a winter walking
    course a few years ago; plenty of sun, light winds, no precipitation to
    speak of. TR will follow when I have a bit of time.

    Which is by way of saying that if you like the British hills in winter,
    and your commitments permit it, now might be a good time to hit the hills,
    as it looks as if the cold, relatively settled weather is staying for most
    of this week.

    Mark
    --
    Mark Manning [email protected]
     
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  2. Mark Manning wrote:
    > I'm just back from an utterly *stonking* weekend in the western Lakes.
    > I wore my crampons more than I have done since I went on a winter walking
    > course a few years ago; plenty of sun, light winds, no precipitation to
    > speak of. TR will follow when I have a bit of time.
    >
    > Which is by way of saying that if you like the British hills in winter,
    > and your commitments permit it, now might be a good time to hit the hills,
    > as it looks as if the cold, relatively settled weather is staying for most
    > of this week.


    Otoh, Saturday in Snowdonia was a day only for the seriously
    well-equipped, experienced and/or foolhardy. We turned back a few
    hundred metres from the top of Y-Garn (at least I hope that's where we
    got to), once the visibility was down to about a cricket pitch, the two
    shadowy figures in front were visibly struggling even with ice-axes,
    and the wind was almost too strong to stand up in. A couple of guys
    passed us on the way down, and said that at the top there was no
    visibility at all.

    It looked much the same on Sunday, albeit with a little less wind, but
    down in the valleys near Bedgelert the sun shone all day and we picked
    up a bit of a tan !

    --
    John
     
  3. We were out on High Street on Friday in perfect conditions (the
    afternoon anyway), on Saturday we went up Grasmoor, the weather was
    gret again, but the summit was blown sheet ice, as was much of the path
    down to Coledale Hause, great for those of us in Ccrampons, but lots of
    people were struggling up and down without!

    John
    http://www.thelakedistrictwalker.com
     
  4. 214Fells

    214Fells Guest

    thelakedistrictwalker.com wrote:
    <snip>
    >, great for those of us in Crampons, but lots of
    > people were struggling up and down without!
    >
    > John
    > http://www.thelakedistrictwalker.com

    </snip>

    It does make me wonder....?

    Is it sheer foolishness or bravado (that could, and recently, has ended
    in death)....?

    David.
     
  5. 214Fells

    214Fells Guest

    Chris Gilbert wrote:
    <snip>
    > No doubt a lot of people, myself included, enjoy the test
    > of knowledge, character and strength that a day in the
    > hills in amongst the elements at thier most extreme gives.
    > There is a point beyond which, however, chance comes
    > into play and knowing when that point is is critical. I've
    > had a few days on the edge, when had the circumstances
    > been slightly different I might not have come back at all
    > and these are the experiences that I have learned the most
    > from. To an extent I have been lucky and chance was in
    > my favour. I can now see this from the perspective of
    > experience. What was my position beforehand ? Had I
    > gone out into conditions that relied on chance and known
    > it then I would have been a bit reckless and, in extremis,
    > foolish. Can a person without knowledge be foolish in these
    > circumstances? I don't think so. Can an innocent be
    > blamed for his/her own demise? Yes, of course, but its just
    > one of those things.

    </snip>

    Don't disagree in the slightest....Perhaps my point really involves
    around knowledgeable sources stating that it is essential (their words
    - not mine) to be properly equiped (crampons and ice axe) and this
    advice be ignored.

    Recently (as I haven't the winter kit or training) I avoided the high
    fells and had a great time on the lower sub-600 metre fells....

    David.
     
  6. 214Fells wrote

    >Perhaps my point really involves
    > around knowledgeable sources stating that it is essential (their words
    > - not mine) to be properly equiped (crampons and ice axe) and this
    > advice be ignored.


    That is willful ignorance, which is what I was alluding to at
    the end.

    It all comes down to belief systems in the end and whether
    you're prepared to sacrifice yours in the light of new knowledge.
    He who can will likely live. He who can't opens himself up to
    chance and to be fair, some people like it that way.

    Chris
     
  7. Richard Webb

    Richard Webb Guest

    Sat 18th.. Utterly wonderful in Ardgour.

    Shame it all started melting on Sunday and the going was evil

    Richard Webb
     
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