broken rear spoke

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tom McCabe, Apr 17, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Tom McCabe

    Tom McCabe Guest

    I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis Day
    01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will it cause any damage to the wheel? Should
    spokes break after this sort of mileage ? I intend to replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to
    make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope it's not going to cause any damage.

    Many thanks

    Tom McCabe
     
    Tags:


  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Tom McCabe wrote:
    > I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis Day
    > 01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    > continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will it cause any damage to the wheel?

    It will be reasonably safe to continue for a day or so but your wheel is likely to get worse if ride
    it much longer: further broken spokes, wheel going out of true, etc.

    > Should spokes break after this sort of mileage ?

    Not if wheel built very well, but this failure is not uncommon.

    > I intend to replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope
    > it's not going to cause any damage.

    True the wheel a bit in the meantime if you can manage.

    ~PB
     
  3. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Tom McCabe <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis Day
    > 01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    > continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will it cause any damage to the wheel? Should
    > spokes break after this sort of mileage ? I intend to replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to
    > make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope it's not going to cause any damage.
    >

    It shouldn't break at all but seeing as its most probably a machine built wheel its actually done
    quite well. Providing the rim is not rubbing on the brake pads (open the brakes out if necessary)
    you should be OK riding it today but get it replaced over the weekend. Its not that difficult to do
    yourself - follow the instructions on Sheldon Brown's website and use the upturned bike and brake
    pads as a make shift truing jig. Once you've finished replacing and tensioning it put on some thick
    gloves and go round squeezing adjacent pairs of spokes together as hard as you can. This stress
    relieves them and reduces the probability of a breakage.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  4. In message <[email protected]>, Tom McCabe <[email protected]> writes
    >I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis Day
    >01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    > continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will it cause any damage to the wheel? Should
    > spokes break after this sort of mileage ? I intend to replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to
    > make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope it's not going to cause any damage.
    >
    >Many thanks
    >
    >Tom McCabe
    >
    >

    You haven't said how many spokes the wheel has. Looking at a picture it appears to have 20. Is this
    the case on yours? There's probably a big difference between losing a spoke on a 20 spoke wheel and
    a 36 spoke wheel.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  5. W K

    W K Guest

    "Tom McCabe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis
    Day
    > 01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    > continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will
    it
    > cause any damage to the wheel? Should spokes break after this sort of mileage ? I intend to
    > replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope it's not
    > going to cause any damage.

    It can over stress remaining spokes, and once one goes others can follow rather quickly. This
    may not be the case if there are "plenty" of spokes, but doesn't that bike have rather a low
    spoke count.

    You may be left in a situation where the spokes have started to fatigue, and may never be reliable,
    whatever you do.
     
  6. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > Once you've finished replacing and tensioning it put on some thick gloves and go round squeezing
    > adjacent pairs of spokes together as hard as you can. This stress relieves them and reduces the
    > probability of a breakage.

    Sheldons tip of an old LH crank makes quite a good tool for beinding the spokes round each
    other, too.

    --

    -Alex

    ----------------------------------
    [email protected]

    http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php http://www.westerleycycling.org.uk
    ----------------------------------
     
  7. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Tom McCabe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis
    > Day
    > > 01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    > > continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will
    > it
    > > cause any damage to the wheel? Should spokes break after this sort of mileage ? I intend to
    > > replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope it's not
    > > going to cause any damage.
    >
    > It can over stress remaining spokes, and once one goes others can follow rather quickly. This
    > may not be the case if there are "plenty" of spokes, but doesn't that bike have rather a low
    > spoke count.

    I'd be happy to ride 25 miles with 35 or 31 good spokes in my wheel. A low spoke count wheel is
    a different proposition, however. With one missing it is likely to go sufficiently out of true
    to become unrideable very quickly. I would also worry about the possibility of the wheel
    collapsing under me.

    --
    Dave...
     
  8. W K

    W K Guest

    "Dave Kahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "W K"

    > > It can over stress remaining spokes, and once one goes others can follow rather quickly. This
    > > may not be the case if there are "plenty" of spokes, but doesn't
    that
    > > bike have rather a low spoke count.
    >
    > I'd be happy to ride 25 miles with 35 or 31 good spokes in my wheel. A low spoke count wheel is a
    > different proposition, however. With one missing it is likely to go sufficiently out of true to
    > become unrideable very quickly. I would also worry about the possibility of the wheel collapsing
    > under me.

    As its already "today" we'll see how he gets on.

    With 160Kg on a moderately well built wheel, 35 spokes can easily go down to 32 ! At which point, I
    decided it was time to give up.
     
  9. David Green

    David Green Guest

    "W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > It can over stress remaining spokes, and once one goes others can follow rather quickly.

    Yes and no; it can't 'over stress' the remainder. One spoke is gone: the rim is under lower overall
    compression (caused by fewer spokes) but the remainder can easily handle any slight increase in
    tension this results in - I'm talking about when the bike isn't being ridden here. They are well
    below the tension at which they break.

    When you sit on the bike, the 4 or 5 spokes in 'contact' with the ground actually have their tension
    reduced, not increased in any way. Where the spoke is missing, there are fewer spokes to support
    your body weight: if their tension is low enough, the wheel could collapse into an unretrievable
    'buckle' if they become slack. So, avoid bumping down potholes until the spoke is replaced.

    The phenomenon of more spokes breaking soon after is more dues to them also being near the end of
    life because of fatigue, a consequence of poor build technique as others have said.

    My experience is that one broken drive-side spoke in a 32-spoke 700C wheel causes enough sideways
    'wobble' to make the bike unridable due to tyre rubbing on chainstays. Goodness knows what fewer
    spokes are like.

    > You may be left in a situation where the spokes have started to fatigue, and may never be
    > reliable, whatever you do.

    Actually, the spokes start to fatigue the moment the bike was first ridden! The reason is that they
    were probably not stress-relieved at all.

    David Green
     
  10. "Dave Kahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Tom McCabe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > I'd be happy to ride 25 miles with 35 or 31 good spokes in my wheel. A low spoke count wheel is a
    > different proposition, however. With one missing it is likely to go sufficiently out of true to
    > become unrideable very quickly. I would also worry about the possibility of the wheel collapsing
    > under me.
    >
    > --

    I think it depends on weight - rider and any luggage. My rear should have had 26 spokes and I must
    have done at least one 25 mile ride on it before I noticed it had dropped to 25, and then did
    another 25 mile ride on it because I had to, before taking it out for repair. In the distance, it
    hasn't gone significantly out of true, it hardly affected ride or handling and whether it was
    significantly in danger of collapse is hard to say - although if the other of its pair went as well
    I wouldn't be very optimistic about the prospects for the structural integrity of the wheel. But, I
    don't weigh a lot either.

    Rich
     
  11. "Richard Goodman" wrote:
    > I think it depends on weight - rider and any luggage. My rear should have had 26 spokes and I must
    > have done at least one 25 mile ride on it before
    I
    > noticed it had dropped to 25,

    I just did a recount - it's actually a 24 spoke wheel reduced to 23! Rich
     
  12. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > With 160Kg on a moderately well built wheel, 35 spokes can easily go down
    to
    > 32 ! At which point, I decided it was time to give up.
    >

    Well I guess we don't have to ask who ate all the pies.
     
  13. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    [email protected] (David Green) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > When you sit on the bike, the 4 or 5 spokes in 'contact' with the ground actually have their
    > tension reduced, not increased in any way. Where the spoke is missing, there are fewer spokes to
    > support your body weight: if their tension is low enough, the wheel could collapse into an
    > unretrievable 'buckle' if they become slack. So, avoid bumping down potholes until the spoke is
    > replaced.
    >
    > The phenomenon of more spokes breaking soon after is more dues to them also being near the end of
    > life because of fatigue, a consequence of poor build technique as others have said.

    The fatigue is caused by the repeated slackening and sudden re-tensioning of the spokes. If there is
    a spoke missing, the spokes around the gap have more of the load to support and will experience an
    increased amount of this. You may even hear them twanging as they snap back into tension. This
    accelerates the fatigue so that spokes that spokes that were perfectly sound before the break will
    quickly become worn out if the wheel is ridden too much.

    --
    Dave...
     
  14. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Richard Goodman" wrote:
    > > I think it depends on weight - rider and any luggage. My rear should have had 26 spokes and I
    > > must have done at least one 25 mile ride on it before
    > I
    > > noticed it had dropped to 25,
    >
    > I just did a recount - it's actually a 24 spoke wheel reduced to 23! Rich

    I was about to ask what sort of wheel it was as it would have been a very strange (wire spoked)
    wheel whose full complement of spokes was not a multiple of 4. Even Sheldon's POWer Wheels have 36
    spokes. :)

    --
    Dave...
     
  15. In message <[email protected]>, Tom McCabe <[email protected]> writes
    >I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis Day
    >01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    > continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will it cause any damage to the wheel? Should
    > spokes break after this sort of mileage ? I intend to replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to
    > make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope it's not going to cause any damage.
    >
    >Many thanks
    >
    >Tom McCabe
    >
    >

    Did you make it or are you still pushing? :)
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  16. Tom McCabe

    Tom McCabe Guest

    "Tom McCabe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been cycling to work for the past 10 months on a Ridgeback Genesis
    Day
    > 01. Total mileage covered in this time is 4500mls. Yesterday a rear spoke broke , is it safe to
    > continue riding minus one spoke and if I do so will
    it
    > cause any damage to the wheel? Should spokes break after this sort of mileage ? I intend to
    > replace the spoke tomorrow but I have to make the 25ml round trip to work today, hope it's not
    > going to cause any damage.
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    > Tom McCabe
    >

    Thanks for all the helpful advice. Made it to work the following day and replaced the spoke at work.
    But I did manage to put a slight bend in the new spoke, think I'll replace it again without the bend
    this time.

    Many thanks

    Tom McCabe
     
  17. rlmarr

    rlmarr New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2003
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  18. rlmarr

    rlmarr New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2003
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  19. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    I got 16 spokes replaced in one of my wheels[1], the cost was estimated at about £20 but because the
    wheel builder could not get the rim as true as he'd like & because he built the wheels originally he
    charged only £15. With Shimano105 hubs and MA3 rim a new wheel would have cost more (a new hub would
    be wider also requiring my frame to be cold set too).

    It depends on the quality of the rim and hub as to whether a new would be a better investment than a
    repair. If you fancy some new wheels to transform the bike then you now have a great excuse.

    [1]Two spokes broke and were replaced in France, before this all spokes had been damaged with
    the chain running off the block so once spokes had started failing I elected to get the whole
    side replaced.

    --
    The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely.
     
  20. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "rlmarr" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Initially the rear wheel I am speaking of was a 50 machine build setup.

    I usually have my machine-built wheels retensioned by hand. My bike mechanic charges very
    little for this.

    --
    Guy
    ===

    WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...