Brooks saddle, but no proofide

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Baka Dasai, Apr 6, 2003.

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  1. Baka Dasai

    Baka Dasai Guest

    I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without getting
    it shipped to Japan (very expensive).

    From a quick bit of googling I find that Brooks recommends only Proofide, and that oil-based
    treatment is bad because it allows the leather to stretch and also reduces breathability. I've also
    come across some mention of Dubbin (which I don't think I can get here), and Snoseal (which I might
    be able to get).

    So what should I do? I have some water-based Nikwax, so it would be great if that was suitable, but
    the wateriness of it makes me a little concerned.
    --
    "Naturally, the common people don't want war. But, after all, it is the leaders of a country who
    determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along. All you have to do is
    tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and exposing
    the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    - Hermann Goering
     
    Tags:


  2. Gary Smiley

    Gary Smiley Guest

    Don't do anything - just ride it. Eventually you will find some in a bike shop, anyway.

    Baka Dasai wrote:

    > I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without
    > getting it shipped to Japan (very expensive).
    >
    > From a quick bit of googling I find that Brooks recommends only Proofide, and that oil-based
    > treatment is bad because it allows the leather to stretch and also reduces breathability. I've
    > also come across some mention of Dubbin (which I don't think I can get here), and Snoseal (which I
    > might be able to get).
    >
    > So what should I do? I have some water-based Nikwax, so it would be great if that was suitable,
    > but the wateriness of it makes me a little concerned.
    > --
    > "Naturally, the common people don't want war. But, after all, it is the leaders of a country who
    > determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along. All you have to do is
    > tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and
    > exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    > - Hermann Goering
     
  3. You can buy Proofide at www.permaco.com and www.rivendellbicycles.com.
     
  4. Leather 101:

    Keep it clean and lubricated and it will last a long time.

    Clean it with saddle soap and water or, in desperate cases (such as after exposure to lots of horse
    sweat), with detergent and a garden hose. After leather goods have been washed (or accidentally
    soaked in water), they need to be relubricated with your favorite leather conditioner (best done
    before they're completely dry). Too much lubrication and the leather will go slack and saggy. If
    this happens, wash out some of the oil. Too little lube and the leather will crack or tear with
    use---disaster! I assume Brooks doesn't like Neats-foot oil because it's easy to overdo it, and then
    the seat will go slack and stretch when ridden on.

    So, since Proofide is hard to get, visit your nearest shoe repair or equestrian tack shop, and
    choose a leather cleaner and a leather conditioner (WITHOUT SILICONE) and use them as
    necessary. I like to use Kiwi saddle soap and either Smiling Mink mink oil or Fiebing's Aussie
    Leather Conditioner with beeswax. There are many similar products, and I'm sure some of them
    are sold in Japan.

    Marian

    Baka Dasai wrote:

    > I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without
    > getting it shipped to Japan (very expensive).
    >
    > From a quick bit of googling I find that Brooks recommends only Proofide, and that oil-based
    > treatment is bad because it allows the leather to stretch and also reduces breathability. I've
    > also come across some mention of Dubbin (which I don't think I can get here), and Snoseal (which I
    > might be able to get).
    >
    > So what should I do? I have some water-based Nikwax, so it would be great if that was suitable,
    > but the wateriness of it makes me a little concerned.
    > --
    > "Naturally, the common people don't want war. But, after all, it is the leaders of a country who
    > determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along. All you have to do is
    > tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and
    > exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    > - Hermann Goering
     
  5. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    Snoseal works fine. I've used it on numerous Brooks saddles.

    Nick

    "Baka Dasai" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without
    > getting it shipped to Japan (very expensive).
    >
    > From a quick bit of googling I find that Brooks recommends only Proofide, and that oil-based
    > treatment is bad because it allows the leather to stretch and also reduces breathability. I've
    > also come across some mention of Dubbin (which I don't think I can get here), and Snoseal (which I
    > might be able to get).
     
  6. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 6 Apr 2003 13:34:36 GMT, Baka Dasai <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without getting
    >it shipped to Japan (very expensive).

    I never used Proofhide and got the job done fine. I have been successul with "SnoPruf" which is used
    to waterproof leather boots and mink oil. My most successul project was a Brooks Countess for my
    wife. I smeared the SnoPruf on the underside of the saddle and then used a hair dryer to melt it in.
    I did this multiple times over about 10 days and the top of the saddle developed a darker brown
    color. She's been using it for a year now and the leather is a chestnut brown and shining. It's
    beautiful and flexible too.
     
  7. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without getting
    >it shipped to Japan (very expensive).

    For what it's worth, I rode a B72 for about five years, not even knowing there was such a thing as
    Proofide....no problems except eventually the wires broke.

    I think the main thing is not to apply oil or anything else that would soak into the leather. The
    whole thing with Proofide is that it does not penetrate - just stays on the surface. What does it do
    there? Dunno...unless it's to prevent infiltration of water. I'm using it on my two B17's...but just
    because somebody said it was a good idea...not out of any technical knowledge.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Baka Dasai wrote:
    > I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without
    > getting it shipped to Japan (very expensive).

    Some other products can spoil the leather - eg. neatsfoot oil in my experience, so I suggest you get
    some shipped over. Perhaps you could order other products at the same time to help justify the
    postage. See: http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm (UK)

    ~PB
     
  9. Pete Cresswell wrote:

    > The whole thing with Proofide is that it does not penetrate - just stays on the surface.

    I'm not positive, but I don't believe this is true. It *appears* to penetrate somewhat, anyway.
    I don't think it's just evaporating, since it disappears much more slowly if at all on
    non-porous surfaces.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    Although the moon is smaller than the earth, it is farther away.
     
  10. Todd Fahrner

    Todd Fahrner Guest

    Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > My most successul project was a Brooks Countess for my wife. I smeared the SnoPruf on the
    > underside of the saddle and then used a hair dryer to melt it in. I did this multiple times over
    > about 10 days and the top of the saddle developed a darker brown color.

    Glad that worked for you, but I will never forget having destroyed a beautiful soft briefcase made
    of thick, minimally processed hide by applying a similar conditioner and then subjecting it to the
    steam escaping from a boiling teakettle. The stuff sink in, and the surface chapped and cracked very
    quickly. I cursed myself for days, having saved my money for a long time to buy the case. Leather
    doesn't like too much heat!

    Non-black Brooks saddles will become darker and more beautiful in time with only minimal care. The
    more you ride, the nicer your saddle will look. It's cheating to accelerate it. :^)

    At some point I read that Proofide contains mutton fat - that explained the smell. Later formulas
    contain lemon oil, presumably to mask the greasy dead sheep smell. I suspect that most any heavy,
    greasy/waxy leather treatment will be fine, while oily, lighter treatments are not so good.
     
  11. You might want to try shoe polish.

    I have used Kiwi brand 'neutral' polish on one of my Brooks saddles and it seems fine to me.

    The can says it 'Shines, Nourishes & Protects'.

    Lewis

    http://tinyurl.com/8vvh

    ...............

    Gary Smiley <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Don't do anything - just ride it. Eventually you will find some in a bike shop, anyway.
    >
    > Baka Dasai wrote:
    >
    > > I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without
    > > getting it shipped to Japan (very expensive).
    > >
    > > From a quick bit of googling I find that Brooks recommends only Proofide, and that oil-based
    > > treatment is bad because it allows the leather to stretch and also reduces breathability. I've
    > > also come across some mention of Dubbin (which I don't think I can get here), and Snoseal (which
    > > I might be able to get).
    > >
    > > So what should I do? I have some water-based Nikwax, so it would be great if that was suitable,
    > > but the wateriness of it makes me a little concerned.
    > > --
    > > "Naturally, the common people don't want war. But, after all, it is the leaders of a country who
    > > determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along. All you have to do
    > > is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and
    > > exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    > > - Hermann Goering
     
  12. Bill Putnam

    Bill Putnam Guest

    > Baka Dasai wrote:
    >
    > > I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without
    > > getting it shipped to Japan (very expensive).

    What do you consider very expensive? For a package under one pound weight to be mailed to Japan from
    the US, surface shipping is $4.05, or shipping by air $9.70. After paying for a new Brooks saddle on
    impulse, this additional cost wouldn't seem prohibitive.

    Bill Putnam
     
  13. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

    On 11 Apr 2003 06:57:54 -0700 [email protected] (Bill Putnam) wrote:

    >> Baka Dasai wrote:
    >>
    >> > I just bought a new Brooks B17 on impulse, but I have no Proofide, and can't buy it without
    >> > getting it shipped to Japan (very expensive).
    >
    >What do you consider very expensive? For a package under one pound weight to be mailed to Japan
    >from the US, surface shipping is $4.05, or shipping by air $9.70. After paying for a new Brooks
    >saddle on impulse, this additional cost wouldn't seem prohibitive.

    Especially considering that Baka-san (yes, I know what it means ;-) called this an impulse purchase.
    I assume thie means that he bought it locally in Japan at their hugely expensive prices for things
    like this.

    -
    -----------------------------------------------
    Jim Adney [email protected] Madison, WI 53711 USA
    -----------------------------------------------
     
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