Brooks saddle, rivets, and seatpost



C

chuck

Guest
I recently conditioned my old Brooks Pro with neatsfoot oil and it has softened up quite a bit. The problem is that it has softened and now I'm riding on the rivets. My seatpost is maxed out as far back as it will allow the seat to go. I guess what I need is a cheap seatpost that will give me another 2" rearward adjustment. By cheap I guess I mean aluminum. Thanks in advance.
 
S

Steve B.

Guest
"chuck" <[email protected]> wrote in message...
>I recently conditioned my old Brooks Pro with neatsfoot oil and it has
>softened up quite a bit. The problem is that it has softened and now I'm
>riding on the rivets. My seatpost is maxed out as far back as it will allow
>the seat to go. I guess what I need is a cheap seatpost that will give me
>another 2" rearward adjustment. By cheap I guess I mean aluminum. Thanks in
>advance.



Sounds like you used too much Neatsfoot, hope the saddle isn't ruined. Most
of the dealers recommend Proofide, with only occasional use.

Couple of options on a SP.

Nashbar sells the Easton EA70, as do others.

http://www.wallbike.com/seatposts/uno374.html
CLB or the Kalloy UNO

I have a CLB on one bike, an Easton on another. Both work well and allow
good fine tuning of tilt, which is crucial in a Brooks. The CLB is much
prettier. Not cheap posts, but they work well, though I don't think any
post will give you an additional 2" of setback.

SB
 
R

richard

Guest
If you didn't ride on the rivets before (and you did lots of riding on
this saddle), you've messed it up - sorry! Set-back isn't going to do
anything positive for you. What it will do is lenghten your reach, put
your foot farther in front of the knee than where it's been, and
probably increase the effective saddle height. Oh yeah, and you'll
probably still be sitting on the rivets...

Tilt the nose down a bit. If it's sagging too much, then tighten the
nose nut. If you can't get the sag out, if it continues to sag, or if
the leather starts tearing at the rivets, then, again, the saddle is
toast... (or a door stop)

chuck wrote:
> I recently conditioned my old Brooks Pro with neatsfoot oil and it has softened up quite a bit. The problem is that it has softened and now I'm riding on the rivets. My seatpost is maxed out as far back as it will allow the seat to go. I guess what I need is a cheap seatpost that will give me another 2" rearward adjustment. By cheap I guess I mean aluminum. Thanks in advance.
 
C

chuck

Guest
On 2005-08-07, richard <[email protected]> wrote:
> If you didn't ride on the rivets before (and you did lots of riding on
> this saddle), you've messed it up - sorry! Set-back isn't going to do
> anything positive for you. What it will do is lenghten your reach, put
> your foot farther in front of the knee than where it's been, and
> probably increase the effective saddle height. Oh yeah, and you'll
> probably still be sitting on the rivets...
>

I did ride on the rivets a little before. The seat doesn't seem ruined. It
isn't sagging *that* much. On closer inspection it seems maybe the one
problem rivet has tilted to an angle that makes it dig into me.

The seatpost I have seems awfully cheap the way the adjustment is set up.
Even an extra 1/2" of setback wou;d help out.

> Tilt the nose down a bit. If it's sagging too much, then tighten the
> nose nut. If you can't get the sag out, if it continues to sag, or if
> the leather starts tearing at the rivets, then, again, the saddle is
> toast... (or a door stop)


No sags or tears, just more give/suspension. This is 300 miles after the
neatsfoot. I believe the neatsfoot helped the saddle. It seemed too dry
before the treatment.
> chuck wrote:
>> I recently conditioned my old Brooks Pro with neatsfoot oil and it has softened up quite a bit. The problem is that it has softened and now I'm riding on the rivets. My seatpost is maxed out as far back as it will allow the seat to go. I guess what I need is a cheap seatpost that will give me another 2" rearward adjustment. By cheap I guess I mean aluminum. Thanks in advance.
 
K

Kevin

Guest
chuck wrote:
>
> I did ride on the rivets a little before. The seat doesn't seem ruined. It
> isn't sagging *that* much. On closer inspection it seems maybe the one
> problem rivet has tilted to an angle that makes it dig into me.


I've had pretty good luck tapping the edges of the rivets bach down
flush with the leather. Lasts longer than you think it will.

Kevin
 
D

Dave Thompson

Guest
(PeteCresswell) wrote:
> Per chuck:
>> No sags or tears, just more give/suspension. This is 300 miles after
>> the neatsfoot. I believe the neatsfoot helped the saddle. It seemed
>> too dry before the treatment.

>
> For what it's worth, Brooks' spiel is that nothing that soaks into
> the leather should be used. Their 'Proofide' is some sort of waxy
> stuff that stays on the surface.
>
> By extension, dry is probably good and moist/supple probably allows
> the leather to streatch too much.

Exactly! A softened leather saddle, like the OP describes, will continue to
stretch until the leather tears. It sounds like the seat in becoming ruined.
 
C

chuck

Guest
On 2005-08-07, (PeteCresswell) <[email protected]> wrote:
> Per chuck:
>>No sags or tears, just more give/suspension. This is 300 miles after the
>>neatsfoot. I believe the neatsfoot helped the saddle. It seemed too dry
>>before the treatment.

>
> For what it's worth, Brooks' spiel is that nothing that soaks into the leather
> should be used. Their 'Proofide' is some sort of waxy stuff that stays on the
> surface.
>


I forgot to mention that this seat sat on a bike and wasn't used for 30
years till I started using it. I don't believe conventional methods apply
to this seat.

> By extension, dry is probably good and moist/supple probably allows the leather
> to streatch too much.
 
M

maxo

Guest
On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 12:53:19 +0000, chuck wrote:

> It
> isn't sagging *that* much.


I find any sag on a Brooks to be very uncomfortable. I guess I'm on of
those wierdos that think that they're most comfy the first year and go
downhill from there.

Anyhow, certainly explore set-back options if that's your real issue--but
I don't think you'll find a post with a good amount of set-back for cheap. :/

To really firm up the saddle you'll want to tension it a bit if you
haven't already done so. A Brooks spanner is best, but you can use a small
crescent wrench. Don't go overboard--start with one turn.

You can also punch the bottom skirt of the saddle three or more times and
lace it together on the underside, firming the top--this gets you 150
"ole-skool" points redeemable for boiled woolen jockstraps.
 
P

(PeteCresswell)

Guest
Per chuck:
>No sags or tears, just more give/suspension. This is 300 miles after the
>neatsfoot. I believe the neatsfoot helped the saddle. It seemed too dry
>before the treatment.


For what it's worth, Brooks' spiel is that nothing that soaks into the leather
should be used. Their 'Proofide' is some sort of waxy stuff that stays on the
surface.

By extension, dry is probably good and moist/supple probably allows the leather
to streatch too much.
--
PeteCresswell
 
P

Paul Kopit

Guest
On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 10:05:45 -0700, "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>For what it's worth, Brooks' spiel is that nothing that soaks into the leather
>should be used. Their 'Proofide' is some sort of waxy stuff that stays on the
>surface.


I'm not sure abou that. I've put Proride on the underside of the
saddle and used a hair dryer at to melt it in. After several
applications, a honey brown saddle begins to darken at the upper
surface and is softer. The saddle repels water too.
 
P

(PeteCresswell)

Guest
Per chuck:
>I forgot to mention that this seat sat on a bike and wasn't used for 30
>years till I started using it


Fallback post ion: Some rivets and a new leather from http://www.wallbike.com -
although I can imagine that the price of those items may add up to compete with
the price of a new saddle...
--
PeteCresswell
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 10:05:45 -0700, "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
> >For what it's worth, Brooks' spiel is that nothing that soaks into the leather
> >should be used. Their 'Proofide' is some sort of waxy stuff that stays on the
> >surface.

>
> I'm not sure abou that. I've put Proride on the underside of the
> saddle and used a hair dryer at to melt it in. After several
> applications, a honey brown saddle begins to darken at the upper
> surface and is softer. The saddle repels water too.


Yes, this is what I do; but rather than a hair dryer
instead put the saddle under a 100 watt light bulb
overnight with the rails facing up. The riding surface of
the saddle eventually exudes Proofide.

--
Michael Press
 
V

victor_pap[email protected]

Guest
On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 02:36:43 GMT, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:

>In article <[email protected]>,
> Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 07 Aug 2005 10:05:45 -0700, "(PeteCresswell)" <[email protected]>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >For what it's worth, Brooks' spiel is that nothing that soaks into the leather
>> >should be used. Their 'Proofide' is some sort of waxy stuff that stays on the
>> >surface.

>>
>> I'm not sure abou that. I've put Proride on the underside of the
>> saddle and used a hair dryer at to melt it in. After several
>> applications, a honey brown saddle begins to darken at the upper
>> surface and is softer. The saddle repels water too.

>
>Yes, this is what I do; but rather than a hair dryer
>instead put the saddle under a 100 watt light bulb
>overnight with the rails facing up. The riding surface of
>the saddle eventually exudes Proofide.


Amazing! The "dead chicken waving" that the faithful will
exercise to try and tame discredited 19th century technology!

Just buy a plastic saddle and ride the bike!
 
C

C.J.Patten

Guest
FWIW, the lid of a can of Proofide list the ingredients in this order:

Tallow, Cod oil, Vegetable oil, Paraffin wax, Beeswax, Citronella oil
 
D

Donald Gillies

Guest
I now use Kiwi "Mink Oil" or "Clear Shoe Polish" on my brooks
saddles. It's not as shiny as Brooks proofide but its sure a heck of
a lot easier to find in local stores ....

- Don Gillies
San Diego, CA
 
W

Warren Block

Guest
C.J.Patten <[email protected]> wrote:
> FWIW, the lid of a can of Proofide list the ingredients in this order:
>
> Tallow, Cod oil, Vegetable oil, Paraffin wax, Beeswax, Citronella oil


Yes. Not only does it condition and protect leather, it can be used to
make lightly fish-scented candles, or cooked into a delicious broth.

It used to be red-tinted and smell a lot more, but the newer stuff seems
to be white and not have much smell at all.

--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA
 
P

(PeteCresswell)

Guest
Per [email protected]:
>Amazing! The "dead chicken waving" that the faithful will
>exercise to try and tame discredited 19th century technology!
>
>Just buy a plastic saddle and ride the bike!


"Discredited"? By who? Not by all the Brook's zealots out there.
--
PeteCresswell
 
M

Mike Latondresse

Guest
"C.J.Patten" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> FWIW, the lid of a can of Proofide list the ingredients in this
> order:
>
> Tallow, Cod oil, Vegetable oil, Paraffin wax, Beeswax, Citronella
> oil
>

Where are the ground up bats and essence of toad.
 
U

User

Guest
On 2005-08-07, Kevin <[email protected]> wrote:
> chuck wrote:
>>
>> I did ride on the rivets a little before. The seat doesn't seem ruined. It
>> isn't sagging *that* much. On closer inspection it seems maybe the one
>> problem rivet has tilted to an angle that makes it dig into me.

>
> I've had pretty good luck tapping the edges of the rivets bach down
> flush with the leather. Lasts longer than you think it will.
>
> Kevin


This seems to be the cure. I carfully pounded in the far right rivet and no more pain in the butt. Too bad it wrecked a pair of Borah shorts first.
 
J

Jasper Janssen

Guest
On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 18:50:46 +0100, [email protected]
wrote:

>Amazing! The "dead chicken waving" that the faithful will
>exercise to try and tame discredited 19th century technology!
>
>Just buy a plastic saddle and ride the bike!


Ah, yes, if it's not plastic it's inferior. Tell me, if people say they
prefer cotton underwear to lycra or other synthetics because they give
them hives, do you tell them to just suck it up and live with it because
cotton is 16th century technology and therefore clearly much inferior?


Jasper