Building a Bike Repair Stand

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Eric, May 20, 2003.

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  1. Eric

    Eric Guest

    Hi All,

    Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.

    peace

    Eric
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Eric) wrote:

    > Hi All,
    >
    > Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    > solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    > preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    > wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.
    >
    > peace
    >
    > Eric

    A good bet is to start by looking at the Park et al workstands and reverse-engineering them.

    http://www.parktool.com/tool_indexes/catindex_workstands.shtml

    Of course, you could just buy one of theirs instead. the bench stands are a nice option.

    Another good one is to just hang the bike from your ceiling. you can use chains and those
    plastic-covered hooks.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  3. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Eric) writes:

    >Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    >solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    >preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    >wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.
    >

    It works and is cheap, decent and reliable to hang it from the ceiling. Two pullys, some rope and
    something to tie it off to.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  4. Onewa

    Onewa Guest

    I clamp my hitch mounted bike rack to a saw horse using three big quick grip clamps. Good for
    occasional use.

    /Onewa

    "Eric" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    > solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    > preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    > wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.
    >
    > peace
    >
    > Eric
     
  5. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Eric wrote:
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    > solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    > preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    > wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.
    >
    > peace
    >
    > Eric

    I took 2 pieces of 2x4 and notched them for the top tube. Screwed them to a piece of plywood. Just
    clamp the plywood to anything high enough. You can hold the bike in more securely when needed by
    using a spring clamp on the top tube at the notch. This worked ok until a nice shiny new bike stand
    showed up one father's day :).

    David
     
  6. Bob Chambers

    Bob Chambers Guest

    I have a Thule Tow Ball mounted Rack. I have a second tow ball on a saw horse and clamp the rack to
    the ball/saw horse. The bike is supported from the rack cramps at just the right height. The back of
    the saw horse needs wedging against the wall to stop the saw horse overturning, and is stable enough
    for most maintenance tasks.

    --
    Bob Chambers "Eric" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    > solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    > preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    > wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.
    >
    > peace
    >
    > Eric
     
  7. Peter Harman

    Peter Harman Guest

    One of the Australian Cyclist magazines of about 5 years ago had a tip of making one out of an old
    tow ball mounted car rack and a car rim for a base. .

    .>"Eric" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Hi All,
    >>
    >> Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    >> solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    >> preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    >> wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.
    >>
    >> peace
    >>
    >> Eric
     
  8. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    "Eric" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > Well I've searched here the newsgroups for around an hour now and haven't found anything really
    > solid on how to build a bike repair stand. I'm looking for free or inexpensive instructions
    > preferably with pictures on how to build a decent, reliable, bike stand out of metal, piping, or
    > wood. Please help me out, thanks in advance.
    >
    > peace
    >
    > Eric

    I got a landscaping timber, a plastic tub, and a sack of cement. Mix the cement, put it in the tub,
    and stick the timber in there until the cement turns into concrete. Affix a $4 wall-type V-shaped
    bike hanger onto the timber. Result= One bike repair stand.

    Pat
     
  9. You could buy one of the bench stands, bolt it to a 4 x 4 piece of lumber and bolt some legs on
    that. I'm looking to do that with mine so I can free up the bench space.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
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