building a bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Mac_Biker, Nov 14, 2011.

  1. Mac_Biker

    Mac_Biker New Member

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    Just got my 2011 cannondale supersix hi-mod frame set.

    I have done a lot of mechanical things on my bike, changing flats, adjusting derailleurs, changing cables, tuning. Minor truing of wheels, handlebar taping.

    I would like to build up my frame set with campagnolo chorus.
    Looking over the tools I have, I will need a simple headset press to press in the bb30 cups.
    A torque wrench driver to make sure I've tightened everything to the right specs.

    Is building a bike up difficult?
    I would think that building a bike up is very enjoyable and would give me a great sense of satisfaction once completed...
    Or do I not need to waste my time and money on getting tools and putting the bike together? And just give it to the shop to assemble?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I do my own assembly. There's nothing really to it, and there is also no shortage of sources in the internet tubes for technical instruction and how-to's. Here are two:

    http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help (covers anything you want to do to a bike)

    http://www.youtube.com (there are loads of instructional videos)

    Campy gruppos are as easy to setup as any other manufacturer's.

    Certainly there is satisfaction for a lot of folks to be had from bike wrenching. I get that satisfaction, and an added bonus is that I don't charge myself much at all.
     
  3. Mac_Biker

    Mac_Biker New Member

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    One thing I see might be challenging is cutting the steerer tube with a hacksaw. Will I need some kind of vice grip to hold it in place?
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    To most accurately cut the steerer, you only need a simple tool:

    [​IMG]

    or maybe one like this:

    [​IMG]

    Many companies make them, and they're available in many places. Other methods can be used, but these will give some piece of mind. Remember, measure twice, thrice, or four times, then cut once.

    Google "fork steerer cutting tool".

    As mentioned in a post above, there are many tutorials for this available online.
     
  5. Mac_Biker

    Mac_Biker New Member

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    Looking at all the extra tools I need to get.

    So in addition to the things I already have, looks like I'll need the following:

    park tool sg-6 - to cut the steerer tube right
    park tool tw-2 torque wrench
    park tool sbs-1 socket and bit set
    park tool hhp-3 headset bearing cup press tool -> to press in the BB30 cups
    park saw-1 to cut the steer tube
    park tool crs-1 - to pound the headset together

    all of this on ebay for a grand total of 270$?

    Do I need all of this?
    Can I do without some of the extra tools?
    If it's going to cost 270$, I might as well have the shop put it together...
    I'm thinking I can go without the CRS-1... and also the saw-1 and just getting a cheap hacksaw at home depot.
    Let me know.
     
  6. AlanG

    AlanG Member

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    You can have a shop press the head and bottom bracket bearings and cut the steerer tube. This is not very expensive and will save you from buying those tools that you might not need again. The rest of the stuff is just assembly and adjustment using mostly hex wrenches. You will need a way to cut cable housing cleanly without pinching the ends. There are special tools for that but I use a cutting wheel on a Dremel and make sure I then clean out any debris from the opening. (You said you've changed cables before so you probably know this already.)
     
  7. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    You can get by without buying a whole lot of specialized tools. I built a bike from the frame up using only:

    Hacksaw and bench vise for the steerer tube

    Dremel and short lengths of old cable wire to cut the new housing. I put the old cable wire in the housing during the cut to limit the deformation of the inner plastic tube of the housing.

    Park Bottom bracket tool - model depends on bottom bracket type (this was the only special tool needed, it was cheap enough and a good item to have in my toolbox anyway.)

    Torque wrench

    Rubber mallet

    Length of PVC pipe to set the crown race

    Heat shrink tubing for the cut cable ends.

    The frame used an integrated headset so no tools were required. There are some home-brew headset press setups that look easy enough and straightforward to use. They are all variations of a long threaded bolt with nylon washers and large metal washers. Here is one such variation : http://www.bikecommuters.com/2007/09/29/homemade-headset-installation-tools/

    Various hex wrenches, a level and a tape measure for the general assembly and adjustment.
     
  8. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Mac, suggest you consider using your LBS to cut the steer tube, press in headset cups, installing the BB, and for any other job requiring a special tool that you'll never need again. if you don't already own a socket set, torque wrench, hex wrenches and keys, a hacksaw and assorted blades, etc, buy these things since you'll need them down the road for routine maintenance too.

    Cutting the steer tube without a guide is easy enough, but with the wrong hacksaw blade and lack of experience the cut produced could be a mess. Same for pressing in cups and bearings with a homemade tool or mallet. The right tools and knowledge make the job go smoother, but with good mechanical skills aren't always needed. A new frame and components could be an expensive way to learn these skills.

    Not saying you can't buy the tools and learn to do everything yourself, but that it's just cheaper and easier to have an experienced LBS mechanic handle some of the jobs. If you're patient and don't mind taking your time and spending money to build up your home bike shop and skills, that's great. But if you just want to put your new bike together and ride it, then the LBS could be a big help.
     
  9. Mac_Biker

    Mac_Biker New Member

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    I've ordered everything. I was going to have the shop press in the BB30 cups. Install the crown race/headset....

    THen I realized the chain tool I have is for a 10 speed. Will it be worth it to get the campy 11 speed chain tool?
     
  10. p38lightning

    p38lightning New Member

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    While others have been correct about the tools you will need for assembly, they have not mentioned that the frame will need to be dressed before installing components. The inner head tube needs to have the paint removed with a special reamer before installing cups. Likewise the bottom bracket shell of the frame has to be dressed to bare metal with a special tool(on the outside not so much the threads.
     
  11. Mac_Biker

    Mac_Biker New Member

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    The bottom bracket shell does not have threads. It's already bare metal. I have a BB30.
    The inner head tube does not have paint.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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