bulging disc:

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Steve Leuty, Aug 27, 2003.

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  1. Steve Leuty

    Steve Leuty Guest

    I hope this is appropriate for this newsgroup. I'm 41 and have been training on the road as well as
    racing since early spring. My form has been very good and have been winning/placing in the top 3 in
    most races. Slowly but surely my back bagan giving my problems. I now can't ride/race as I have been
    diagnosed with a "bulging disc in my lower back. The bike I've been using is new to me (since June
    2003). Could my positioning on the bike have caused my back problem? Thanks Steve Leuty

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  2. I had a similar problem two years ago. Severe lower back pain after several weeks of hard climbing.
    Pain so severe I could only noodle along after a while. I generally have tight muscles and have to
    stretch a lot (warm up, stretch, warm down, stretch) Physician couldn't find anything terribly
    wrong, but I suspect a good occasional soak in a hot tub or massage would have held it off. Sounds
    like you're past that stage, though. I hung up the bike for 6 weeks to recover. It hasn't come back.
    Best of luck.

    Steve Leuty wrote:

    > I hope this is appropriate for this newsgroup. I'm 41 and have been training on the road as well
    > as racing since early spring. My form has been very good and have been winning/placing in the
    > top 3 in most races. Slowly but surely my back bagan giving my problems. I now can't ride/race
    > as I have been diagnosed with a "bulging disc in my lower back. The bike I've been using is new
    > to me (since June 2003). Could my positioning on the bike have caused my back problem? Thanks
    > Steve Leuty
    >
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
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  3. Tony

    Tony Guest

    I've had similar problems with my back. My doctor prescribed vioxx and it has worked wonders.

    Tony
     
  4. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Steve Leuty wrote:
    > I hope this is appropriate for this newsgroup. I'm 41 and have been training on the road as well
    > as racing since early spring. My form has been very good and have been winning/placing in the
    > top 3 in most races. Slowly but surely my back bagan giving my problems. I now can't ride/race
    > as I have been diagnosed with a "bulging disc in my lower back. The bike I've been using is new
    > to me (since June 2003). Could my positioning on the bike have caused my back problem? Thanks
    > Steve Leuty

    I get lower back pain on the road bike but it hasn't been severe or chronic enough to take to a
    doctor. Lifting seems to be helping (abs & back isolations, but I lift for other muscles as well).

    I don't get this pain at all on my mtb, so it sounds like a position tweak is in order.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  5. Shultz

    Shultz Guest

    I have a bulging disc in my neck and it does cause me problems on long rides with numbness going
    down one arm. I have found if I don't hold the same position for long periods this will hold off the
    pain and numbness.

    I also have a doctor friend who had to start riding a recumbent bike so he could ride his pain
    was so bad.

    I suggest you talk to your doctor, I wouldn't mess with possible back injury.

    Bob

    "Steve Leuty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I hope this is appropriate for this newsgroup. I'm 41 and have been training on the road as well
    > as racing since early spring. My form has been very good and have been winning/placing in the
    > top 3 in most races. Slowly but surely my back bagan giving my problems. I now can't ride/race
    > as I have been diagnosed with a "bulging disc in my lower back. The bike I've been using is new
    > to me (since June 2003). Could my positioning on the bike have caused my back problem? Thanks
    > Steve Leuty
    >
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
     
  6. Jtn

    Jtn Guest

    it of course could be bad position. set your pos per recommended methods by top trainers. give your
    body time to adjust to it also.

    most likely it is due to the abs being weak and the IT bands tightening. then pulling your lower
    back slightly out of whack. work weights all winter on abs, lower back, and solar plexus. you will
    notice a big improvement by Jan if you start now.

    I have 3 bulging discs in upper neck. I keep em in check by light weight lifting and stretching.
    bulging disc are minor according to the orthopedist I have seen out here. one clinic being the
    Steadman-Hawkins in Vail.
     
  7. Dashi Toshii

    Dashi Toshii Guest

    "JTN" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > it of course could be bad position. set your pos per recommended methods
    by
    > top trainers. give your body time to adjust to it also.
    >
    > most likely it is due to the abs being weak and the IT bands tightening. then pulling your lower
    > back slightly out of whack. work weights all
    winter
    > on abs, lower back, and solar plexus. you will notice a big improvement by Jan if you start now.

    How do you work your solar plexus with weights, my abs and lower back are in great shape.

    I never knew that you could work the solar plexus by itself.

    Dashii
     
  8. Mike Murray

    Mike Murray Guest

    "Steve Leuty" <[email protected]> asks : "I have been diagnosed with a "bulging disc in my lower
    back. The bike I've been using is new to me (since June 2003). Could my positioning on the bike have
    caused my back problem?"

    Disc herniation is caused by failure of the outer layer of the disc. Failure may happen because of
    traumatic loading of the disc in an axial direction, such as a fall or lifting injury. Often there
    is no trauma history. Although you position on the bike may worsen symptoms from disc herniation, it
    did not cause the problem.

    --
    Mike Murray MD
     
  9. Neptunium

    Neptunium Guest

    I had back problems and tried sit-ups to remedy the problem and it worked. Probable cause of my
    back strain could have been poor sitting positions in my chair. I used to fold my leg in a half
    lotus position while sitting all the time and I had to stop doing that. It was apparently
    pinching my spine.
     
  10. Barryg

    Barryg Guest

    "JTN" <[email protected].com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I have 3 bulging discs in upper neck. I keep em in check by light weight lifting and stretching.

    Could you please describe the weight lifting you do? I have a similar problem which is putting a
    crimp in my road riding.
     
  11. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Regardless of the cause, you need to do the following:

    Increase Hamstring flexibility Increase Back Strength Increase Abdominal strength Lose abdominal
    weight if that is a problem for you

    Position changes that you might find helpful:

    Lower saddle Raise Handlebars Shorter stem

    Michael Ross, MD www.bikedoctraining.com
     
  12. Steve Leuty

    Steve Leuty Guest

    So I've been told. Now I have to work this out since I'm not ready for early retirement from the
    bike. steve

    Mike Murray wrote:

    >"Steve Leuty" <[email protected]> asks : "I have been diagnosed with a "bulging disc in my
    >lower back. The bike I've been using is new to me (since June 2003). Could my positioning on the
    >bike have caused my back problem?"
    >
    >Disc herniation is caused by failure of the outer layer of the disc. Failure may happen because of
    >traumatic loading of the disc in an axial direction, such as a fall or lifting injury. Often there
    >is no trauma history. Although you position on the bike may worsen symptoms from disc herniation,
    >it did not cause the problem.
    >
    >
    >

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  13. Steve Leuty

    Steve Leuty Guest

    I've been tweeking the adjustments of my bike. Thanks for the advise. steve

    Michael wrote:

    >Regardless of the cause, you need to do the following:
    >
    >Increase Hamstring flexibility Increase Back Strength Increase Abdominal strength Lose abdominal
    >weight if that is a problem for you
    >
    >Position changes that you might find helpful:
    >
    >Lower saddle Raise Handlebars Shorter stem
    >
    >
    >Michael Ross, MD www.bikedoctraining.com
    >
    >

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  14. Steve Leuty

    Steve Leuty Guest

    Michael wrote:

    >Regardless of the cause, you need to do the following:
    >
    >Increase Hamstring flexibility Increase Back Strength Increase Abdominal strength Lose abdominal
    >weight if that is a problem for you
    >
    >Position changes that you might find helpful:
    >
    >Lower saddle Raise Handlebars Shorter stem
    >
    >
    >Michael Ross, MD www.bikedoctraining.com
    >
    >
    At this point in time, I'm seeing a physical therapist and she is working to ease my pain and
    suffering. I'm also doing some stretching (yes, hamstrings and the works). My back pain is
    decreasing but the bulge is still there. I can feel it constantly. Is is a good idea to do back
    strengthening with a bulging disc? I've not touched my bike in almost three weeks and have become
    stagnant (lying on my couch with a heat pad on my lower back). I'm getting depressed and want to go
    out and ride some but I'm affraid that might agrivate the injury even more. Steve Leuty

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  15. Dashi Toshii

    Dashi Toshii Guest

    "Steve Leuty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Michael wrote:
    >
    > >Regardless of the cause, you need to do the following:
    > >
    > >Increase Hamstring flexibility Increase Back Strength Increase Abdominal strength Lose abdominal
    > >weight if that is a problem for you
    > >
    > >Position changes that you might find helpful:
    > >
    > >Lower saddle Raise Handlebars Shorter stem
    > >
    > >
    > >Michael Ross, MD www.bikedoctraining.com
    > >
    > >
    > At this point in time, I'm seeing a physical therapist and she is working to ease my pain and
    > suffering. I'm also doing some stretching (yes, hamstrings and the works). My back pain is
    > decreasing but the bulge is still there. I can feel it constantly. Is is a good idea to do back
    > strengthening with a bulging disc? I've not touched my bike in almost three weeks and have become
    > stagnant (lying on my couch with a heat pad on my lower back). I'm getting depressed and want to
    > go out and ride some but I'm affraid that might agrivate the injury even more.

    Michael's advice seems pretty sound, I would ride and if it gets worse with riding, take a couple of
    days off and try again.

    Dashii
     
  16. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Steve Leuty wrote:
    > heat pad on my lower back). I'm getting depressed and want to go out and ride some but I'm affraid
    > that might agrivate the injury even more. Steve Leuty

    Then ride. Get an avenue cruiser if you need to, bar extenders on a mountain bike, whatever. I find
    that if I *need* to ride, even crap pedaling like that feels great.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  17. Wannagofast

    Wannagofast Guest

    It would be highly unlikely you could "feel" a budging disc with your hands, more likely tight
    muscles around the spin due to guarding for weakness and/or disc pain.

    Is it painful to touch, if so, then likely you need surgery. If not, you may be able to treat it
    through agressive PT. Ask your PT about traction. If your disc doesn't have an external tear,
    that can help.

    Good luck.

    "Steve Leuty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Michael wrote:
    >
    > >Regardless of the cause, you need to do the following:
    > >
    > >Increase Hamstring flexibility Increase Back Strength Increase Abdominal strength Lose abdominal
    > >weight if that is a problem for you
    > >
    > >Position changes that you might find helpful:
    > >
    > >Lower saddle Raise Handlebars Shorter stem
    > >
    > >
    > >Michael Ross, MD www.bikedoctraining.com
    > >
    > >
    > At this point in time, I'm seeing a physical therapist and she is working to ease my pain and
    > suffering. I'm also doing some stretching (yes, hamstrings and the works). My back pain is
    > decreasing but the bulge is still there. I can feel it constantly. Is is a good idea to do back
    > strengthening with a bulging disc? I've not touched my bike in almost three weeks and have become
    > stagnant (lying on my couch with a heat pad on my lower back). I'm getting depressed and want to
    > go out and ride some but I'm affraid that might agrivate the injury even more. Steve Leuty
    >
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
     
  18. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    "Steve Leuty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Michael wrote:
    >
    > >Regardless of the cause, you need to do the following:
    > >
    > >Increase Hamstring flexibility Increase Back Strength Increase Abdominal strength Lose abdominal
    > >weight if that is a problem for you
    > >
    > >Position changes that you might find helpful:
    > >
    > >Lower saddle Raise Handlebars Shorter stem
    > >
    > >
    > >Michael Ross, MD www.bikedoctraining.com
    > >
    > >
    > At this point in time, I'm seeing a physical therapist and she is working to ease my pain and
    > suffering. I'm also doing some stretching (yes, hamstrings and the works). My back pain is
    > decreasing but the bulge is still there. I can feel it constantly. Is is a good idea to do back
    > strengthening with a bulging disc? I've not touched my bike in almost three weeks and have become
    > stagnant (lying on my couch with a heat pad on my lower back).

    I have been going through this for over a year now (from a car wreck).

    I'm getting depressed and want to go out and
    > ride some but I'm affraid that might agrivate the injury even more. Steve Leuty

    My advice (on top of endorsing what Dr. Ross and your MDs have told you) is to stay in touch with
    the bike using a stationary trainer to keep your fitness up beyond nil. Nothing feels worse than
    having days and weeks pass where you have not turned a pedal. If you want to be safe, do stationary
    rides and during those sessions you will sense how much your back can take. An addition, it will
    make a tremendous difference in your fitness when you do hit the road. What you want to avoid at all
    costs is losing all of your fitness and then trying to go out on the road without having even sat on
    the bike for weeks or longer. Trust me, the stationary trainer is your bridge back to a normal life
    with your bike when you are ready.
     
  19. Nick Burns

    Nick Burns Guest

    One more thing below...

    "Steve Leuty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Michael wrote:
    >
    > >Regardless of the cause, you need to do the following:
    > >
    > >Increase Hamstring flexibility Increase Back Strength Increase Abdominal strength Lose abdominal
    > >weight if that is a problem for you
    > >
    > >Position changes that you might find helpful:
    > >
    > >Lower saddle Raise Handlebars Shorter stem

    When looking at reach (to accomadate injuries), people usually go to the stem first. In this case,
    your back may respond better of you look at saddle position first (before stem length) to adjust
    reach. Sometimes the seat angle is what is putting pressure on your back and it feels like the stem
    length would solve it.

    Try pushing the saddle forward a bit first and then adjust the stem if necessary.

    > >
    > >
    > >Michael Ross, MD www.bikedoctraining.com
    > >
     
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