Bunions



M

Mary

Guest
Are bicycle riders who use conventional toe clips (more like
a cage) more prone to have bunions than riders who do not
use toe clips?

Thanks

Tom
 
D

David Kerber

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] net.com says...
> Are bicycle riders who use conventional toe clips (more
> like a cage) more prone to have bunions than riders who do
> not use toe clips?

I've never heard this. FWIW I use toe clips, and I don't
have bunions, but one data point doesn't mean much. However,
I think you'd have to have the clips pretty tight before
there was any significant risk of this.

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S

S. Anderson

Guest
"David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I've never heard this. FWIW I use toe clips, and I don't
> have bunions, but one data point doesn't mean much.
> However, I think you'd have to have the clips pretty tight
> before there was any significant risk of this.

Pure speculation here...aren't bunions caused by a
deformation of the foot bones, more generally caused by
shoes that are too short? I thought they were more of a bone
pointing out the side of the foot because they're being
squished on the ends. Maybe if the clips are too short in
the front and the cleat too far back? Corns I can see being
caused by toe clips because of the friction of the strap.

Cheers,

Scott..
 
K

Kevan Smith

Guest
On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 15:56:37 -0500, "mary" <[email protected]> from wrote:

>Are bicycle riders who use conventional toe clips (more
>like a cage) more prone to have bunions than riders who do
>not use toe clips?
>
>Thanks

Your question cannot be answered factually, because no one
has medically studied the issue at all. However, if you mean
a bunion as a swelling of the first joint of the big toe, I
can tell you my experience is to have more foot swelling on
long rides with clipless pedals than with cages. That's
because the sole of the clipless shoe is extremely firm,
while the shoes I wear with cages have flexible soles. Firm,
hard soles transfer power from your legs to the pedals more
efficiently, but the tradeoff can be foot pain over time
and/or distance.

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