Burn that fat....

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Slacker, Mar 8, 2003.

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  1. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    I've been playing with my eating habits lately, basically bumped up the fat & protein and
    lowered the carbs. My body fat percentage is slowly dropping, which is how I wanted to do it,
    slowly. In addition, working-out (riding or in the gym) to increase muscle, which in turn will
    consume more calories.

    Anyway, this article does a good job of explaining how our bodies burn up the fat and muscle.

    http://www.velonews.com/train/articles/3543.0.html

    --
    Slacker
     
    Tags:


  2. mtbnewz

    mtbnewz Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been playing with my eating habits lately, basically bumped up the
    fat & protein and lowered the carbs. My body fat percentage
    > is slowly dropping, which is how I wanted to do it, slowly. In addition,
    working-out (riding or in the gym) to increase muscle,
    > which in turn will consume more calories.
    >
    > Anyway, this article does a good job of explaining how our bodies burn up
    the fat and muscle.
    >
    > http://www.velonews.com/train/articles/3543.0.html
    >
    > --
    > Slacker

    ------------

    Sounds like a longer, more moderate ride may be better than a short intense ride for fat burning.
    that's good to know.

    once I finally figured out the how to lose weight, I shed 50 lbs in about 6 months...now the real
    work is keeping it off, which I've done for about a 18 months, by staying on my program (for the
    rest of my life I guess). a blood-test after I lost the weight showed I was hypoglycemic and had
    low protein, which manifested itself into some scary side effects at night so I guess I lost too
    much too fast.

    but I must admit, the weight loss did absolute wonders for my riding. going from 215 to 160
    positively affected my riding more than I would have ever dreamed. ..aside from the tremendous speed
    improvement, my handling, bunny hopping, dropping.... you name it, it has improved. Not to mention
    no more bent rims, bent seatposts, broken forks, pinch flats, snoring, pimples on my ass, etc, etc.

    s
     
  3. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been playing with my eating habits lately, basically bumped up the
    fat & protein and lowered the carbs.

    My father's on that diet too...but his "bumping up the protein" includes pound-of-ground-beef with
    cheddar on top dinners and pint-of-ice-cream desserts. It isn't quite working.

    Chris
     
  4. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Chris wrote:
    > "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I've been playing with my eating habits lately, basically bumped up the
    > fat & protein and lowered the carbs.
    >
    > My father's on that diet too...but his "bumping up the protein" includes pound-of-ground-beef with
    > cheddar on top dinners and pint-of-ice-cream desserts. It isn't quite working.
    >
    > Chris

    hahaha bumping up the protein does NOT mean bumping up the fat. I do believe it's supposed to be
    LEAN protein...!

    penny
     
  5. Chris

    Chris Guest

    > hahaha bumping up the protein does NOT mean bumping up the fat. I do believe it's supposed to be
    > LEAN protein...!
    >
    > penny
    >

    Everyday I SO try to tell him that...but he swears protein is protein. I ask how ground beef and
    sausage (he eats the hell out of sausage) compare to fish and chicken breast, but to no avail.
    That's why we're the same height, and I weigh 30 pounds less (it's not an age thing...well, I'm sure
    it is, but only to a very small extent).

    Chris
     
  6. Tj

    Tj Guest

    The New Diet Revolution. By Charles Atkins. Read it. It will give you a lot of insite to low carb
    diets. I have lost 18 pounds in the last month. I have been getting a little faster. Loosing is
    good sometimes

    TJ

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been playing with my eating habits lately, basically bumped up the
    fat & protein and lowered the carbs. My body fat percentage
    > is slowly dropping, which is how I wanted to do it, slowly. In addition,
    working-out (riding or in the gym) to increase muscle,
    > which in turn will consume more calories.
    >
    > Anyway, this article does a good job of explaining how our bodies burn up
    the fat and muscle.
    >
    > http://www.velonews.com/train/articles/3543.0.html
    >
    > --
    > Slacker
     
  7. U Reach

    U Reach Guest

    On Sat, 8 Mar 2003 23:50:43 -0600, "TJ" <[email protected]> blurted:

    >The New Diet Revolution. By Charles Atkins. Read it. It will give you a lot of insite to low carb
    >diets. I have lost 18 pounds in the last month. I have been getting a little faster. Loosing is
    >good sometimes

    You should generally loose once per day. If you only loose occasionally, it could cause other
    problems like hemorrhoids, fever, and difficulty sitting on the seat.

    >TJ
    >
    >
    >"Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> I've been playing with my eating habits lately, basically bumped up the
    >fat & protein and lowered the carbs. My body fat percentage
    >> is slowly dropping, which is how I wanted to do it, slowly. In addition,
    >working-out (riding or in the gym) to increase muscle,
    >> which in turn will consume more calories.
    >>
    >> Anyway, this article does a good job of explaining how our bodies burn up
    >the fat and muscle.
    >>
    >> http://www.velonews.com/train/articles/3543.0.html
    >>
    >> --
    >> Slacker

    --
    "<the spurs are the best team ever>" -Louise [email protected], 2/2/3
     
  8. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    > how to lose weight

    ?
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  9. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Sun, 09 Mar 2003 00:51:35 GMT, "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've been playing with my eating habits lately, basically bumped up the fat & protein and lowered
    >the carbs. My body fat percentage is slowly dropping, which is how I wanted to do it, slowly. In
    >addition, working-out (riding or in the gym) to increase muscle, which in turn will consume more
    >calories.
    >
    >Anyway, this article does a good job of explaining how our bodies burn up the fat and muscle.
    >
    >http://www.velonews.com/train/articles/3543.0.html

    Very nice Slackman keep spreading the word. Although this article is rather short it covers the
    subject VERY well.

    Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
    should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
    :-]
     
  10. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    TJ wrote:
    > The New Diet Revolution. By Charles Atkins. Read it. It will give you a lot of insite to low carb
    > diets. I have lost 18 pounds in the last month. I have been getting a little faster. Loosing is
    > good sometimes
    >

    Fitness/ nutrition is a pretty interesting subject, very complex. I've just started trying to plow
    through some of the sports information out there beyond "diets" Low carb has some benefits, but what
    is really amazing to me is to learn how much carbohydrate is used/needed by the body when exercising
    heavily and training heavily... up to 60-70%!!!

    In my experience, lo carb is not compatible with heavy training and exercise. I did a Mayo clinic
    2-week zero carb plan a few years ago, and I tell you, I just could not ride. I was sapped. Anything
    that required effort just killed me. Since then I"m trying to learn more about balance and
    moderation and fueling myself while not overweighing my diet in any one area.

    Penny

    --
    me and my bike: www.specialtyoutdoors.com/biking.htm
     
  11. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > TJ wrote:
    > > The New Diet Revolution. By Charles Atkins. Read it. It will give you a lot of insite to low
    > > carb diets. I have lost 18 pounds in the last month. I have been getting a little faster.
    > > Loosing is good sometimes
    > >
    >
    > Fitness/ nutrition is a pretty interesting subject, very complex. I've just started trying to plow
    > through some of the sports information out there beyond "diets" Low carb has some benefits, but
    > what is really amazing to me is to learn how much carbohydrate is used/needed by the body when
    > exercising heavily and training heavily... up to 60-70%!!!
    >
    > In my experience, lo carb is not compatible with heavy training and exercise. I did a Mayo clinic
    > 2-week zero carb plan a few years ago, and I tell you, I just could not ride. I was sapped.
    > Anything that required effort just killed me. Since then I"m trying to learn more about balance
    > and moderation and fueling myself while not overweighing my diet in any one area.
    >
    > Penny

    Very true. Carbs are absolutely essential. I tested that zero carb (Atkins) deal too and experienced
    some nasty kidney pains and lost 10 lbs in 11 days. Doesn't mean anything if it's only a temporary
    change; it's just matter a figuring out your own body and it's particular needs not wants.
    --
    Slacker
     
  12. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Slacker wrote:
    > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> TJ wrote:
    >>> The New Diet Revolution. By Charles Atkins. Read it. It will give you a lot of insite to low
    >>> carb diets. I have lost 18 pounds in the last month. I have been getting a little faster.
    >>> Loosing is good sometimes
    >>>
    >>
    >> Fitness/ nutrition is a pretty interesting subject, very complex. I've just started trying to
    >> plow through some of the sports information out there beyond "diets" Low carb has some benefits,
    >> but what is really amazing to me is to learn how much carbohydrate is used/needed by the body
    >> when exercising heavily and training heavily... up to 60-70%!!!
    >>
    >> In my experience, lo carb is not compatible with heavy training and exercise. I did a Mayo clinic
    >> 2-week zero carb plan a few years ago, and I tell you, I just could not ride. I was sapped.
    >> Anything that required effort just killed me. Since then I"m trying to learn more about balance
    >> and moderation and fueling myself while not overweighing my diet in any one area.
    >>
    >> Penny
    >
    >
    > Very true. Carbs are absolutely essential. I tested that zero carb (Atkins) deal too and
    > experienced some nasty kidney pains and lost 10 lbs in 11 days. Doesn't mean anything if it's
    > only a temporary change; it's just matter a figuring out your own body and it's particular needs
    > not wants.

    at the same time, by trying a low/no carb regime.... it's easy to see how you can crave them or be
    hooked on them. Too many of the wrong kind, or using them for filler or substittues for better
    nutrition choices.

    penny
     
  13. Aps

    Aps Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, TJ <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The New Diet Revolution. By Charles Atkins. Read it. It will give you a lot of insite to low carb
    > diets. I have lost 18 pounds in the last month. I have been getting a little faster. Loosing is
    > good sometimes

    I'd recommend getting an LDL cholesterol check before diving into the Atkins Diet. It tends to
    devolve into indulging on high-fat foods to compensate for the satiety lost by reducing carbs.
    Personally, I've always had high LDL despite a heart-healthy diet, so Atkins ain't for
    me.

    What makes the most sense to me is watching out for foods with a high glycemic index--that includes
    simple carbs, but it's more about how fast and heavily it releases glucose into your blood stream,
    and the insulin + fat storing response. That and maintaining enough muscle tissue to keep the
    metabolism even with the calorie intake.

    APS
     
  14. Tj

    Tj Guest

    Use wisely I say. The Atkins diet has been very controversial. If you are excercising ( Riding) Gage
    the carbs you use and adjust accordingly. Buy the book. The induction phase of the diet is only a
    very small portion of the regimen. People use it as a crutch when they need to drop a few pounds.
    Since starting it, I have a blood sugar level that is more consitent. I have lost a bunch of weight.
    And I ride faster.

    TJ

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Slacker wrote:
    > > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >> TJ wrote:
    > >>> The New Diet Revolution. By Charles Atkins. Read it. It will give you a lot of insite to low
    > >>> carb diets. I have lost 18 pounds in the last month. I have been getting a little faster.
    > >>> Loosing is good sometimes
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >> Fitness/ nutrition is a pretty interesting subject, very complex. I've just started trying to
    > >> plow through some of the sports information out there beyond "diets" Low carb has some
    > >> benefits, but what is really amazing to me is to learn how much carbohydrate is used/needed by
    > >> the body when exercising heavily and training heavily... up to 60-70%!!!
    > >>
    > >> In my experience, lo carb is not compatible with heavy training and exercise. I did a Mayo
    > >> clinic 2-week zero carb plan a few years ago, and I tell you, I just could not ride. I was
    > >> sapped. Anything that required effort just killed me. Since then I"m trying to learn more about
    > >> balance and moderation and fueling myself while not overweighing my diet in any one area.
    > >>
    > >> Penny
    > >
    > >
    > > Very true. Carbs are absolutely essential. I tested that zero carb (Atkins) deal too and
    > > experienced some nasty kidney pains and lost 10 lbs in 11 days. Doesn't mean anything if it's
    > > only a temporary change; it's just matter a figuring out your own body and it's particular needs
    > > not wants.
    >
    > at the same time, by trying a low/no carb regime.... it's easy to see how you can crave them or be
    > hooked on them. Too many of the wrong kind, or using them for filler or substittues for better
    > nutrition choices.
    >
    > penny
     
  15. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Use wisely I say. The Atkins diet has been very controversial. If you
    are
    > excercising ( Riding) Gage the carbs you use and adjust accordingly. Buy the book. The induction
    > phase of the diet is only a very small portion of the regimen. People use it as a crutch when they
    > need to drop a few
    pounds.
    > Since starting it, I have a blood sugar level that is more consitent. I have lost a bunch of
    > weight. And I ride faster.
    >
    > TJ
    >

    Atkins, even in the most restrictive phase, isn't zero carb. What I do is add carbs prior to
    workouts and afterwards, and I really have no problem riding. However, I'm not a 250 mile/week
    person. I exercise 1.25 hours on the bike and 1.5 hours weight lifting for about 3-4 times per week;
    my biking is all hills; my weight lifting (I'm currently only biking due to injuries) is hard, fast,
    with lighter weights. Consistent blood sugar level is the only reason I'm on Atkins. With high carb,
    I had to hang onto something after eating brown rice or pasta and I fell asleep every day at 3pm.
    Now, my blood sugar is rock solid and I feel great, with no lull around 3 pm. And, my cholesterol is
    fine and the numbers have improved (triglycerides are down, HDL up and LDL down). I even eat more
    vegetables now than I did on high carb.
     
  16. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Use wisely I say. The Atkins diet has been very controversial. If you
    > are
    > > excercising ( Riding) Gage the carbs you use and adjust accordingly. Buy the book. The induction
    > > phase of the diet is only a very small portion of the regimen. People use it as a crutch when
    > > they need to drop a few
    > pounds.
    > > Since starting it, I have a blood sugar level that is more consitent. I have lost a bunch of
    > > weight. And I ride faster.
    > >
    > > TJ
    > >
    >
    > Atkins, even in the most restrictive phase, isn't zero carb. What I do is add carbs prior to
    > workouts and afterwards, and I really have no problem riding. However, I'm not a 250 mile/week
    > person. I exercise 1.25 hours on the bike and 1.5 hours weight lifting for about 3-4 times per
    > week; my biking is all hills; my weight lifting (I'm currently only biking due to injuries) is
    > hard, fast, with lighter weights. Consistent blood sugar level is the only reason I'm on Atkins.
    > With high carb, I had to hang onto something after eating brown rice or pasta and I fell asleep
    > every day at 3pm. Now, my blood sugar is rock solid and I feel great, with no lull around 3 pm.
    > And, my cholesterol is fine and the numbers have improved (triglycerides are down, HDL up and LDL
    > down). I even eat more vegetables now than I did on high carb.

    <<snipped from Google's cache of http://www.nutrition.cornell.edu/nutriquest/ketosis.html >>

    To understand how ketosis develops, you first need to understand how the liver converts the food you
    eat into fuels and how the body uses these fuels.

    How does the liver convert the food you eat into fuels? The protein, complex carbohydrates, and fat
    that you eat -- and the protein, carbohydrate, and fat in your body -- can all be used to fuel your
    body functions. But first, the liver converts them into chemicals the body's tissues can use as
    fuel, as follows:

    The liver converts the carbohydrates into a simple sugar, glucose, which can fuel most body
    functions. It converts any excess protein you eat, over and above what you need to replace the
    proteins in your body, into glucose as well. It converts the fats into chemicals called ketone
    bodies. Once these conversions are made, the liver exports the glucose and ketone bodies into the
    blood stream for distribution to the tissues for use as fuel.

    How do you develop ketosis on a low carbohydrate diet? The amount of ketone bodies you make depends
    on how much glucose is available to your system. If you starve yourself, or if you eat a low to no
    carbohydrate diet, you will make large amounts of ketone bodies to compensate for the lack of
    carbohydrates. As a result, you will start to accumulate these ketone bodies in your blood stream.
    This accumulation is called ketosis, and the diet that causes this accumulation is called a
    ketogenic diet. Ketosis will give a distinctive taste in your mouth, and a distinct (and not very
    pleasant) breath odor -- it smells like a cross between apples and nail polish remover -- because
    some of these ketones can be exhaled from your lungs as as gas.

    Can all tissues use ketone bodies as fuel? Most tissues can use ketone bodies as fuel, so when
    little glucose is available, they switch to using ketone bodies. But there are several tissues of
    the body which don't do very well when you have ketosis. These include your brain, the muscles you
    use for rapid movement, and your red blood cells.

    Ketosis and your brain One tissue that cannot use ketone bodies very well as a fuel is the brain.
    The brain needs a certain amount of carbohydrate per day to function properly -- about 150 grams a
    day, or the equivalent of about 12 slices of bread, or 3 baked potatoes. The brain's need for
    carbohydrate is one of the reasons why the Food Guide Pyramid recommends that you eat 6-11 servings
    of the Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta Group a day.

    If you eat a low carbohydrate diet for a while, or if you starve, you brain can start to use ketones
    for about 50% of its fuel needs. But when your brain uses ketones, it cannot function at its best --
    thinking and reaction times tend to slow down. People tend not to notice these changes when they are
    on a low to no carbohydrate diet, because the brain changes make them slower to react to any
    stimulus, including the stimuli that come from self-awareness. So you may not be aware of this
    slowing down, but it may make a difference if you use machinery, such as a car, which requires quick
    thinking and quick reflexes.

    Note that physicians have used ketogenic diets for people with epilepsy. Epilepsy is a kind of
    electric storm in the brain. Ketogenic diets slow down all brain functions, so if you are epileptic,
    a ketogenic diet will make your brain less likely to react to the trigger that sets off electric
    storms in your brain.

    Ketosis and your muscles Another tissue that cannot use ketones very well are the muscles that you
    need to use for fast movement. For example, the muscles in your hands cannot use ketone bodies very
    well, so on a low carbohydrate diet, your fast repeated hand movements will slow down and your
    hands' endurance will decrease -- for example you will become slower and more tired when you type
    for a long time.

    Furthermore, on a low to no carbohydrate diet, the protein you eat, and protein from muscles is
    converted to glucose to supply the brain's needs. So if you go on this diet, you may feel tired
    because you have lost muscle mass as well.

    Water weight loss with ketosis When you begin a low to no carbohydrate diet, you will experience
    water weight loss, even when you don't change the total amount of calories that you eat. This
    water weight loss is due to the changes in kidney function, including loss of body sodium, that
    accompany the need to excrete the excess ketone bodies. As a result you will reach a new, slightly
    dehydrated weight.

    You will also need to excrete the urea that is produced when you convert protein into fuels and into
    glucose. The urea is excreted along with water, so that you will continue to have higher than normal
    water loss.

    A note about ketosis and diabetes People who have Type I diabetes mellitus can develop ketosis as
    well. People who have Type I diabetes mellitus require insulin injections in order to use the
    glucose that the liver produces. When they don't have enough insulin in circulation, the body can't
    use the glucose, and acts as if there was no glucose in the blood stream. As a result, fat cells
    break up the fat they contain into free fatty acids, and send them via the blood stream to the
    liver. There the liver converts the fats into ketone bodies.

    Because the fat cells release their fats at a very high rate, the production of ketones also occurs
    at a very high rate, a rate much greater than the rate at which the body can use the ketones. Under
    these circumstances, ketosis can become severe. The ketosis is coupled with dehydration and loss of
    sodium and potassium, which occurs because the body tries to excrete the excess glucose via the
    urine. The dehydration, ketosis, loss of sodium and potassium, and the development of high blood
    acid levels, together lead to a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be
    fatal if the person is not treated with insulin. The ketosis you develop with a low to no
    carbohydrate diet is a very mild condition when compared with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Why can people lose weight on a low carbohydrate diet? As noted above, when you start a low
    carbohydrate diet, you will have some amount of water weight loss. As you continue on the diet, you
    may experience a decreased appetite, and these diets lack variety, so you will eat less. As a result
    you will lose weight -- in fact any diet where you take in fewer calories than your body needs will
    result in weight loss.
     
  17. In article <W6xba.1657$S%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > > something after eating brown rice or pasta and I fell asleep every day at 3pm. Now, my blood
    > > sugar is rock solid and I feel great, with no lull around 3 pm. And, my cholesterol is fine and
    > > the numbers have improved (triglycerides are down, HDL up and LDL down). I even eat more
    > > vegetables now than I did on high carb.
    >
    >
    > <<snipped from Google's cache of http://www.nutrition.cornell.edu/nutriquest/ketosis.html >>
    >
    > To understand how ketosis develops, you first need to understand how the liver converts the food
    > you eat into fuels and how the body
    >

    That really should read "snipped from the mouth's of the establishment." I can't beleive it doesn't
    even mention that being in Ketosis is a virtual cure for Type II diabetes or that your liver breaks
    down fat that is already stored in your body for energy which leads to rapid weight loss. Losing
    weight just because of lack of appetite and water loss, what a crock of shit.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  18. Tj

    Tj Guest

    I was going to say the same thing. I have been droping some poundage with the Atkins eating habit. (
    I say eating habit because I just changed what I eat, not how much) The establishment is coming
    around though. The studies support what Atkins has been saying for years.

    TJ

    "Chris Phillipo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <W6xba.1657$S%[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > > > something after eating brown rice or pasta and I fell asleep every day
    at
    > > > 3pm. Now, my blood sugar is rock solid and I feel great, with no lull around 3 pm. And, my
    > > > cholesterol is fine and the numbers have
    improved
    > > > (triglycerides are down, HDL up and LDL down). I even eat more
    vegetables
    > > > now than I did on high carb.
    > >
    > >
    > > <<snipped from Google's cache of
    http://www.nutrition.cornell.edu/nutriquest/ketosis.html >>
    > >
    > > To understand how ketosis develops, you first need to understand how the
    liver converts the food you eat into fuels and how the body
    > >
    >
    > That really should read "snipped from the mouth's of the establishment." I can't beleive it
    > doesn't even mention that being in Ketosis is a virtual cure for Type II diabetes or that your
    > liver breaks down fat that is already stored in your body for energy which leads to rapid weight
    > loss. Losing weight just because of lack of appetite and water loss, what a crock of shit.
    > --
    > _________________________
    > Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  19. Benrand

    Benrand Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 20:23:14 -0500, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Use wisely I say. The Atkins diet has been very controversial. If you
    >are
    >> excercising ( Riding) Gage the carbs you use and adjust accordingly. Buy the book. The induction
    >> phase of the diet is only a very small portion of the regimen. People use it as a crutch when
    >> they need to drop a few
    >pounds.
    >> Since starting it, I have a blood sugar level that is more consitent. I have lost a bunch of
    >> weight. And I ride faster.
    >>
    >> TJ
    >>
    >
    >Atkins, even in the most restrictive phase, isn't zero carb. What I do is add carbs prior to
    >workouts and afterwards, and I really have no problem riding. However, I'm not a 250 mile/week
    >person. I exercise 1.25 hours on the bike and 1.5 hours weight lifting for about 3-4 times per
    >week; my biking is all hills; my weight lifting (I'm currently only biking due to injuries) is
    >hard, fast, with lighter weights. Consistent blood sugar level is the only reason I'm on Atkins.
    >With high carb, I had to hang onto something after eating brown rice or pasta and I fell asleep
    >every day at 3pm. Now, my blood sugar is rock solid and I feel great, with no lull around 3 pm.
    >And, my cholesterol is fine and the numbers have improved (triglycerides are down, HDL up and LDL
    >down). I even eat more vegetables now than I did on high carb.
    >

    I had the same loss of eneergy when I ate a lot of pasta.

    Cutting carbs out is one of the best things I;ve ever done for myself. And eating more spinach...
     
  20. El Barista

    El Barista Guest

    "benrand" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I had the same loss of eneergy when I ate a lot of pasta.
    >
    > Cutting carbs out is one of the best things I;ve ever done for myself. And eating more spinach...

    I'm curious, what are both of your bodies' compositions? Brown rice, especially if it's long grain,
    shouldn't cause a blood sugar spike. I eat almost exclusively low GI carbs, except for post-workout,
    and I couldn't walk up and down the stairs at work without carbs, let alone bike.

    -will
     
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