burning legs/lack of lungs&heart

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Velvet, Jul 25, 2003.

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  1. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Ok, quick question.

    I've had both of these (and sometimes both together). But I'm curious as to when I get just one or
    the other and what the root cause is...

    Hills around here (north downs), I've been getting burning legs before running out of puff.

    Hills around cambridge, I seem to run out of puff before getting burning legs.

    Why the difference? I know burning is the lactic acid, but I would have expected to run out of puff
    before getting that?

    Velvet
     
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  2. W K

    W K Guest

    "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Ok, quick question.
    >
    > I've had both of these (and sometimes both together). But I'm curious as to when I get just one or
    > the other and what the root cause is...
    >
    > Hills around here (north downs), I've been getting burning legs before running out of puff.
    >
    > Hills around cambridge, I seem to run out of puff before getting burning legs.
    >
    > Why the difference? I know burning is the lactic acid, but I would have expected to run out of
    > puff before getting that?

    From what I see on the HRM, you can make yours legs go anearobic without your HR going up much.
    Obviously the HR catches up later, but there is a lag. To try to keep a constant HR means slowing
    down a lot, and avoiding temptation (the lag could catch you out.). [And on the manc->blackpool it
    was really tempting, I kept on getting overtaken by keen MTBers as I was easing myself up the hills]

    Perhaps cambridge hills (??!!!??) are longer and you are gradually get up to being out of puff, but
    steeper, shorter hills are likely to get the "lag" above.
     
  3. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    W K wrote:

    > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Ok, quick question.
    >>
    >>I've had both of these (and sometimes both together). But I'm curious as to when I get just one or
    >>the other and what the root cause is...
    >>
    >>Hills around here (north downs), I've been getting burning legs before running out of puff.
    >>
    >>Hills around cambridge, I seem to run out of puff before getting burning legs.
    >>
    >>Why the difference? I know burning is the lactic acid, but I would have expected to run out of
    >>puff before getting that?
    >
    >
    > From what I see on the HRM, you can make yours legs go anearobic without your HR going up much.
    > Obviously the HR catches up later, but there is a lag. To try to keep a constant HR means
    > slowing down a lot, and avoiding temptation (the lag could catch you out.). [And on the
    > manc->blackpool it was really tempting, I kept on getting overtaken by keen MTBers as I was
    > easing myself up the hills]
    >
    > Perhaps cambridge hills (??!!!??) are longer and you are gradually get up to being out of puff,
    > but steeper, shorter hills are likely to get the "lag" above.
    >
    >

    Heh, perhaps - they're definitely not quite as steep (I wasn't in the lowest gear till probably 2/3
    the way up the one I tried recently) but probably no longer than the one here (which is steeper, I
    think, but unless I compare those red squiggles on maps I can't tell for sure). The hill here I was
    in lowest gear after about a minute :)

    And yes, despite your amazement, there *are* hills to be found around cambridge. I might add here
    that I call the hills around me 'mountains', which makes the cambridge undulations/mild hills
    'reasonable hills' and flat roads 'mostly flat'. You might notice a lack of 'gentle undulations'.
    There's no such thing at the moment, according to my body. It's either flat, or reasonable hills :)

    Having seen quite an improvement in stops needed on my local mountainside I've tried this week
    though, I'm mentally a lot more positive about the hills, though I doubt the same can be said for
    cycling down steeper hills ;-)

    Oh. Going back to the 'scary' thread. I drove back down that hill slowly last night, and counted the
    bricks in a convenient wall built along one side. At the steepest (scariest) part of it, it would
    seem to be roughly a 1 in 4 gradient. There's no signs to this effect though - so I might be wrong -
    but it IS speed humped, so maybe they feel the 'low gear now' and gradient signs aren't necessary?

    Velvet
     
  4. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Velvet <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Hills around here (north downs), I've been getting burning legs before running out of puff.

    : Hills around cambridge, I seem to run out of puff before getting burning legs.

    You'll find that it will come and go depending on things like wind, steepness of hill and (the
    biggee) the relative state of different bits of your body.

    Generally steeper hills will tax the muscles first, since they need brute strength. Longer hills or
    wind will tax the lungs.

    However you'll find that some weeks your lungs are the limiter, some weeks your legs. As you keep at
    it and get fitter you'll eventually get to a happy nirvana where you can make the whole lot ache
    lots all at once :) Arthur
     
  5. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > Velvet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : Hills around here (north downs), I've been getting burning legs before running out of puff.
    >
    > : Hills around cambridge, I seem to run out of puff before getting burning legs.
    >
    > You'll find that it will come and go depending on things like wind, steepness of hill and (the
    > biggee) the relative state of different bits of your body.
    >
    > Generally steeper hills will tax the muscles first, since they need brute strength. Longer hills
    > or wind will tax the lungs.
    >
    > However you'll find that some weeks your lungs are the limiter, some weeks your legs. As you keep
    > at it and get fitter you'll eventually get to a happy nirvana where you can make the whole lot
    > ache lots all at once :) Arthur
    >

    Thanks Arthur, that's made me laugh lots :) I'm still grinning about that - I might print that out
    and stick it up here somewhere to remind me just what I'm working towards LOL

    Velvet
     
  6. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    W K <[email protected]> wrote:

    : From what I see on the HRM, you can make yours legs go anearobic without your HR going up much.
    : Obviously the HR catches up later, but there is a lag.

    This is the problem with using a HRM - it's no good for aneraboic stuff since my the time your heart
    catches up your legs are trashed.

    Very intense aneraboic stuff is best done on feel really.

    Arthur
     
  7. W K

    W K Guest

    "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > W K <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : From what I see on the HRM, you can make yours legs go anearobic without your HR going up much.
    > : Obviously the HR catches up later, but there is
    a
    > : lag.
    >
    > This is the problem with using a HRM - it's no good for aneraboic stuff since my the time your
    > heart catches up your legs are trashed.
    >
    > Very intense aneraboic stuff is best done on feel really.

    IMO - best not done at all!
     
  8. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Frank X wrote:
    > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Ok, quick question.
    >>
    >>I've had both of these (and sometimes both together). But I'm curious as to when I get just one or
    >>the other and what the root cause is...
    >>
    >>Hills around here (north downs), I've been getting burning legs before running out of puff.
    >>
    >
    > Which North Downs would they be?
    >
    > I think the rule is your legs go if you spin in a low gear, your lungs go if you get out of the
    > saddle and go up in a big gear.
    >
    > Although I'm not sure when I'm going up the North Downs (SE London) I tend to vary a climb between
    > spinning and being out of the saddle. So I end up feeling totally knackered allover.
    >
    >

    The north downs around Purley/Kenley/Whyteleafe/Caterham/Coulsdon way
    :) My current project is to cycle all the way up Welcomes Road in
    Kenley without having to stop. Two attempts so far - first time stopped 4-5 times, second time
    stopped twice. That's a big improvement, but I think helped most by knowing the hill the second time
    around. I think it's going to take quite a lot more attempts before I get it down to 1 stop!

    Oh. And the scary downhill was Park Road, Kenley, in case anyone's interested enough to look them up
    on multimap to see what the contours are like.

    Can't avoid 'mountainsides' around here, it seems!

    Velvet
     
  9. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Frank X <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I think the rule is your legs go if you spin in a low gear, your lungs go if you get out of the
    : saddle and go up in a big gear.

    Other way round.

    Arthur
     
  10. W K wrote:

    > [And on the manc->blackpool it was really tempting, I kept on getting overtaken by keen MTBers as
    > I was easing myself up the hills]

    *waves*

    --
    Dnc
     
  11. W K

    W K Guest

  12. Frank X

    Frank X Guest

    "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:%[email protected]...
    > Frank X wrote:
    > > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>Ok, quick question.
    > >>
    > >>I've had both of these (and sometimes both together). But I'm curious as to when I get just one
    > >>or the other and what the root cause is...
    > >>
    > >>Hills around here (north downs), I've been getting burning legs before running out of puff.
    > >>
    > >
    > > Which North Downs would they be?
    > >
    > > I think the rule is your legs go if you spin in a low gear, your lungs
    go if
    > > you get out of the saddle and go up in a big gear.
    > >
    > > Although I'm not sure when I'm going up the North Downs (SE London) I
    tend
    > > to vary a climb between spinning and being out of the saddle. So I end
    up
    > > feeling totally knackered allover.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > The north downs around Purley/Kenley/Whyteleafe/Caterham/Coulsdon way
    > :) My current project is to cycle all the way up Welcomes Road in
    > Kenley without having to stop. Two attempts so far - first time stopped 4-5 times, second time
    > stopped twice. That's a big improvement, but I think helped most by knowing the hill the second
    > time around. I think it's going to take quite a lot more attempts before I get it down to 1
    stop!
    >
    > Oh. And the scary downhill was Park Road, Kenley, in case anyone's interested enough to look them
    > up on multimap to see what the contours are like.
    >
    > Can't avoid 'mountainsides' around here, it seems!
    >
    > Velvet
    >
    Bit far west for me.

    I do sometime try and cut through that area when I cycle back from my mums

    very steep hill is going up a hill when you are already tired and completely lost with out a clue if
    you are going in the right direction, Knowing that you could have easily avoided all the hills by
    following the A23 up to Croydon.

    Earlier this year I nearly messed up a knee going (completely lost) up wold road/ hilltop lane.

    My hands tend towards cramp on some of the downhill's too :eek:(
     
  13. Simon Proven

    Simon Proven Guest

    Colin Davidson wrote:

    > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]... (CUT)
    >
    >>Hills around cambridge, I seem to run out of puff before getting burning legs.
    >
    > (CUT)
    >
    > Hills around Cambridge?

    Cambridge is on the edge of the fens. It gets quite a bit hillier to the south and it's possible to
    get a decent workout if you know where to look.

    The hill in question is the one between Cherry Hinton and Little Shelford. We took White Hill since
    it allowed us to avoid Limekiln Road which isn't nice for inexperienced cyclists (or for experienced
    ones, for that matter), and is also higher and steeper.

    http://www.multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?X=547000&Y=254000&scale=25000&coordsys=gb

    Simon
     
  14. Daniel Auger

    Daniel Auger Guest

    On Fri, 25 Jul 2003, Velvet wrote:

    > Hills around cambridge,

    ?

    --
    Daniel Auger - [email protected]granta.cam.ac.uk (Please remove Granta to get a valid address.)
     
  15. Daniel Auger <[email protected]> wrote: ( On Fri, 25 Jul 2003, Velvet wrote: ) > Hills around
    cambridge, ( ?

    Don't knock it: BT directory enquiries finds 120 Hills in Cambridge (and two Clarke-Hills, two
    Robbins-Hills, a Wylie-Hill and a Lennox Hill Ltd).
     
  16. "Daniel Auger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 25 Jul 2003, Velvet wrote:
    >
    > > Hills around cambridge,
    >
    Not far from Cambridge lies the Gog-Magog hills - rising to all of 70m or so.

    Ric
     
  17. > > Hills around cambridge,
    >
    > ?

    There is a Hills Road. There's even a little incline on it where it crosses the railway tracks ;-)

    Cheers,

    Jon
     
  18. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Jonathan Geater wrote:
    >>>Hills around cambridge,
    >>
    >>?
    >
    >
    > There is a Hills Road. There's even a little incline on it where it crosses the railway tracks ;-)
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Jon
    >
    >
    Right, yer gits.

    There ARE hills around Cambridge ;-) And a previous posting of mine *did* make clear what I view a
    hill to be, as opposed to what you lot would define a hill :p

    On a positive note, I managed a 32 mile ride on sunday, taking in some HILLS around cambridge, and
    managed all bar one of them without stopping on the climb (not counting being forced to stop on one
    from level crossing being down). Also got waved at by other cyclists (nice, didn't realise they were
    friendly *grin*) and overtook two pairs of cyclists (whee, makes me feel a LOT better) including one
    that I could relate too all too well, slogging it up a hill in too high a gear and getting left well
    behind - being able to tell someone else that it *does* get easier and realising that things HAVE
    improved quite a bit is an amazing confidence boost.

    Also learnt I can get a hand off the bars (after fitting new stem to raise them slightly) fairly
    well now, which is good for starting to get signalling sorted out. Managed a good speed down some
    hills (none of them like the local mountainsides round here) - clocked 22mph at some point - and
    several stretches along flatter sections at 15-18mph steadily.

    Am much much happier with the bike after the stem change, and dead chuffed with managing the 32miles
    with a grin on my face almost all the way around (I can't grin whilst slogging up very long steady
    climbs yet, that takes effort needed elsewhere).

    Wheeee!

    Velvet
     
  19. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 15:27:58 GMT, Velvet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Am much much happier with the bike after the stem change, and dead chuffed with managing the
    >32miles with a grin on my face almost all the way around (I can't grin whilst slogging up very long
    >steady climbs yet, that takes effort needed elsewhere).

    It's nice to hear you're making good progress. Keep it up.

    --
    Dave...
     
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