Buttermilk



M

Murphassoc

Guest
Bought some for a recipe that did not get made. Now out of date. Throw it out? Use it how? TIA, JM
 
T

Tess

Guest
Hi there, JM : )

I very nearly consider myself to be an expert on buttermilk, so let's seeeee ........

How out of date is it? Is that "use by date"? If it isn't too bad, you can use it to make muffins,
and some other such things. Believe it or not, it's also great on a baked potato.

Cheers : )

- Tess

"MurphAssoc" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
m02.aol.com...
> Bought some for a recipe that did not get made. Now out of date. Throw
it
> out? Use it how? TIA, JM
 
L

Lorena

Guest
Errr..I know this sounds gross, but I've used it in baked goods all the way up until 2 months past
the date! I figure....sometimes recipes ask for sour milk, and this is just super-sour buttermilk!

I get great results, and I figure it's not harmful because it's baked. I probably wouldn't use it in
non-baked goods though.

"MurphAssoc" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
m02.aol.com...
> Bought some for a recipe that did not get made. Now out of date. Throw
it
> out? Use it how? TIA, JM
 
M

Murphassoc

Guest
Thanks very much. About a week out of date, so will use for muffins and perhaps biscuits? JM
 
T

Tess

Guest
"MurphAssoc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Thanks very much. About a week out of date, so will use for muffins and perhaps biscuits? JM

Sure thing : ) Unless it's just .... really foul .... you'd know by smelling it, it ought to work
fine for those things, I've done it myself. Be sure and shake it really well, because sometimes
it'll clump up a little at the bottom.

Soon to come : a new post where I tell how to make buttermilk without a churn : )

Cheers ~

~ Tess
 
W

Wardna

Guest
>Bought some for a recipe that did not get made. Now out of date. Throw it out? Use it how?

For baking, as long as it passes the smell test, it's OK; three weeks past the use-by date seems
fine. Eventually, the sour quality turns to a dull mustiness that shows up unpleasantly in the
baked product.

Neil
 
L

Lallin

Guest
When I have extra, I measure it into one-cup portions and freeze them. Next time I need buttermilk,
I thaw a portion; it does separate a bit but I just stir it to remix; when used in a recipe, it's
really not a problem.

On 8-Feb-2004, [email protected] (WardNA) wrote:

>Bought some for a recipe that did not get made. Now out of date. Throw it out? Use it how?
 
E

Ellie C

Guest
LAllin wrote:

> When I have extra, I measure it into one-cup portions and freeze them. Next time I need
> buttermilk, I thaw a portion; it does separate a bit but I just stir it to remix; when used in a
> recipe, it's really not a problem.
>
> On 8-Feb-2004, [email protected] (WardNA) wrote:
>
>
>>Bought some for a recipe that did not get made. Now out of date. Throw it out? Use it how?

On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if you
do not have any to start with?
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Ellie C wrote:

> On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if you
> do not have any to start with?

Add a soonful of vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of milk.
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Ellie C wrote:

>
> On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if you
> do not have any to start with?

Add a spoonful of vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of milk and let it sit for about 15 minutes.
 
N

No One

Guest
I start with some buttermilk. I also have tons of powdered milk that I never know what to do with.
I've taken to making buttermilk with it.

Buy some butermilk, Get a large, preferably glass bottle with a wide neck, put in 1 cup of
buttermilk as a starter. Add whatever milk you like, regular, skim, reconstituted -- about a quart.
Leave it sit out on the counter overnight and watch the thickness. When it's done, just keep in the
frig and use until there is about 1 cup left then repeat the process.

I use it in all baked goods from waffles to cakes. I don't care for the taste of it to drink as I
don't care for the taste of reconstituted powdered milk. My sister uses regular milk to make it and
loves it. Can't tell the difference from regular bought buttermilk. "Ellie C"
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>
> LAllin wrote:
>
> > When I have extra, I measure it into one-cup portions and freeze them.
Next
> > time I need buttermilk, I thaw a portion; it does separate a bit but I
just
> > stir it to remix; when used in a recipe, it's really not a problem.
> >
> > On 8-Feb-2004, [email protected] (WardNA) wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Bought some for a recipe that did not get made. Now out of date.
Throw
> >>it out? Use it how?
>
> On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if you
> do not have any to start with?
 
L

Lorena

Guest
Yes, you can do the add acid to milk trick, but it won't turn out as thick as buttermilk - so if
you're making something like pancakes, it may not be as thick as if you had used buttermilk.

"Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> Add a spoonful of vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of milk and let it sit
for about
> 15 minutes.
 
B

Bob

Guest
Dave Smith wrote:

> Ellie C wrote:
>
>>On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if you
>>do not have any to start with?
>
> Add a spoonful of vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of milk.

That's *sour* milk, not buttermilk.

True buttermilk is what's left over after churning butter. Nowadays, most commercial buttermilk is
either skimmed or low-fat with an added culture and stabilizers.

To make a passable substitute, add a tablespoon of yogurt to milk and follow yogurt-making
directions. Google is our friend.

Bob
 
E

Ellie C

Guest
No One wrote:

> I start with some buttermilk. I also have tons of powdered milk that I never know what to do with.
> I've taken to making buttermilk with it.
>
> Buy some butermilk,

I can't buy buttermilk; that's the whole problem. As far as I can find, it does not exist in French
supermarkets.
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Bob wrote:

> Dave Smith wrote:
>
> > Ellie C wrote:
> >
> >>On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if
> >>you do not have any to start with?
> >
> > Add a spoonful of vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of milk.
>
> That's *sour* milk, not buttermilk.
>
> True buttermilk is what's left over after churning butter. Nowadays, most commercial buttermilk is
> either skimmed or low-fat with an added culture and stabilizers.
>
> To make a passable substitute, add a tablespoon of yogurt to milk and follow yogurt-making
> directions. Google is our friend.
>

Yes Google is our friend, and if you had used Google to look for substitute for buttermilk you would
have noticed that it gives a number of sites that say to use milk and vinegar or lemon juice and let
it stand. It makes sour milk which you can use in place of buttermilk. It may not be the perfect
replacement for buttermilk, but it is a viable substitute.
 
L

Lorena

Guest
Then I think your problem can be solved using the "sour milk" method posted from Dave Smith. It's a
good substitute.

"Ellie C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>

> I can't buy buttermilk; that's the whole problem. As far as I can find, it does not exist in
> French supermarkets.
 
T

The Cook

Guest
Ellie C <[email protected]> wrote:

>
>
>No One wrote:
>
>> I start with some buttermilk. I also have tons of powdered milk that I never know what to do
>> with. I've taken to making buttermilk with it.
>>
>> Buy some butermilk,
>
>I can't buy buttermilk; that's the whole problem. As far as I can find, it does not exist in French
>supermarkets.

The old fashioned way to make buttermilk is to start with whole milk. Let it sit at room temperature
until it is sour. Then churn the milk to get butter. The remaining liquid is buttermilk.

--
Susan N.

There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who do not.
 
T

The Wolf

Guest
On 02/09/2004 6:44 PM, in article [email protected], "Dave
Smith" <[email protected]> opined:

> Bob wrote:
>
>> Dave Smith wrote:
>>
>>> Ellie C wrote:
>>>
>>>> On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if
>>>> you do not have any to start with?
>>>
>>> Add a spoonful of vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of milk.
>>
>> That's *sour* milk, not buttermilk.
>>
>> True buttermilk is what's left over after churning butter. Nowadays, most commercial buttermilk
>> is either skimmed or low-fat with an added culture and stabilizers.
>>
>> To make a passable substitute, add a tablespoon of yogurt to milk and follow yogurt-making
>> directions. Google is our friend.
>>
>
> Yes Google is our friend, and if you had used Google to look for substitute for buttermilk you
> would have noticed that it gives a number of sites that say to use milk and vinegar or lemon juice
> and let it stand. It makes sour milk which you can use in place of buttermilk. It may not be the
> perfect replacement for buttermilk, but it is a viable substitute.
>
>
Yes Google is our friend. AND if you would have used Google for a search of Stupid canadian Libs it
would have returned David Smith.
--
=======================================================================
The principal difference between genius and stupidity is that there are limits to genius!
=======================================================================
 
E

Ellie C

Guest
Dave Smith wrote:

> Bob wrote:
>
>
>>Dave Smith wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Ellie C wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>On a slightly difrerent topic, but still about buttermilk:Is there a way to make buttermilk if
>>>>you do not have any to start with?
>>>
>>>Add a spoonful of vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of milk.
>>
>>That's *sour* milk, not buttermilk.
>>
>>True buttermilk is what's left over after churning butter. Nowadays, most commercial buttermilk is
>>either skimmed or low-fat with an added culture and stabilizers.
>>
>>To make a passable substitute, add a tablespoon of yogurt to milk and follow yogurt-making
>>directions. Google is our friend.
>>
>
>
> Yes Google is our friend, and if you had used Google to look for substitute for buttermilk you
> would have noticed that it gives a number of sites that say to use milk and vinegar or lemon juice
> and let it stand. It makes sour milk which you can use in place of buttermilk. It may not be the
> perfect replacement for buttermilk, but it is a viable substitute.
>
>
I know Google, thank you. (Why do people in these groups always assume that [posters other than
themselves are stupid and lazy?) I wasn't looking for a substitute, I was wondering if there was a
way to make actual buttermilk.
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Lorena" <[email protected]> wrote:

> "Ellie C" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >
>
> > I can't buy buttermilk; that's the whole problem. As far as I can find, it does not exist in
> > French supermarkets.
> >
>
> > Then I think your problem can be solved using the "sour milk" method posted
> from Dave Smith. It's a good substitute.

<sigh> As she has posted before... She is not wanting a substitute!!! She wants to learn how to make
buttermilk, the _real_ stuff!!!

Where do you get the cultures and how do you apply them???????

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra