Buying a Bianchi Roader for Commuting

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Corsaire, Oct 17, 2003.

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  1. Corsaire

    Corsaire New Member

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    Hi folks,

    I need advice from the more experienced. I have my eyes set on a Bianchi road bike, which I'm planning to use for commuting to and fro 12 miles each way, only when good weather is on, thres days a week if at all possible. I'm upgrading from a hybrid Univega 1995.
    But my big dilemma is between the GIRO 2003 (AL frame, carbon seat stay and fork) and maybe the EROS or Vigorelli (both Chromoly, the Vigorelly has the Reynolds 631, both with carbon forks too), so far I have just tested the GIRO, it blew me away, nice stealthy ride, light and highly manuverable, it fit me like a glove, I have YET to test the Chromolies (Eros and Vigorelli). although I know for a fact that steel have given me the cushiest ride, now my dilemma is this: I'm highly concerned with DURABILITY. I know AL frames are good and all if well designed etc etc, but overtime it'll FAIL, in other words: its life span is limited, not so with steel.
    Which bike should I go for if I don't want to buy another bike in 5 or ten years, DURABILITY for the long haul????
    Thanks for the feedback,
    Corsaire
     
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  2. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 18 Oct 2003 03:16:26 +0950, Corsaire <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I know AL frames are good and all if well designed etc etc, but overtime it'll FAIL, in other
    >words: its life span is limited, not so with steel. Which bike should I go for if I don't want
    >to buy another bike in 5 or ten years, DURABILITY for the long haul???? Thanks for the
    >feedback, Corsaire

    With luck, you will live longer than the frame will take to wear out in your application.
     
  3. Corsaire

    Corsaire New Member

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    >>>>With luck, you will live longer than the frame will take to wear out in your application. [/B][/QUOTE] <<<<<<

    I'd only wish it was that easy but according to the technical data I've been reading over the net, the AL metal FATIGUE is a fact in a given time period, regardless of the best design, frame geometry, etc etc, after so many (not talking bike abuse here) rides those little microscopic crack in the Al will compound to a point where it'll fatigue and possibly crack the frame structure, it's just a matter of time. Just like when they retire airplanes after 15 years, as to steel frames can last a long time given its properties and if not abuse, normal riding with the usual bumpy road could last a life time.
    These fact are bugging me a lot, I just came back from the LBS and lifted the Vigorelli (reynolds 631)...man! very light for steel. not as light as the GIRO AL, but light......I don't know, I'm inclining towards STEEL.....
    Corsaire
     
  4. mt_biker

    mt_biker New Member

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    <<<<<<

    I'd only wish it was that easy but according to the technical data I've been reading over the net, the AL metal FATIGUE is a fact in a given time period, regardless of the best design, frame geometry, etc etc, after so many (not talking bike abuse here) rides those little microscopic crack in the Al will compound to a point where it'll fatigue and possibly crack the frame structure, it's just a matter of time. Just like when they retire airplanes after 15 years, as to steel frames can last a long time given its properties and if not abuse, normal riding with the usual bumpy road could last a life time.
    These fact are bugging me a lot, I just came back from the LBS and lifted the Vigorelli (reynolds 631)...man! very light for steel. not as light as the GIRO AL, but light......I don't know, I'm inclining towards STEEL.....
    Corsaire [/B][/QUOTE]

    Buy what you want or are most comfortable with.

    My '95 aluminum mountain bike and my '98 aluminum road bike are still going strong. I'm sure others have greater longevity stories but I wouldn't (and haven't) hesitate on buying aluminum frames again.

    Definitely ride the others for a comparison.
     
  5. Jim Beam

    Jim Beam Guest

    > I'd only wish it was that easy but according to the technical data I've been reading over the net,
    > the AL metal FATIGUE is a fact in a given time period, regardless of the best design, frame
    > geometry, etc etc, after so many (not talking bike abuse here) rides those little microscopic
    > crack in the Al will compound to a point where it'll fatigue and possibly crack the frame
    > structure, it's just a matter of time.

    yes, but how much time? it really depends how much you ride. it's most unlikely that you will
    fatigue most modern al frames in less than 100,000 miles unless it has a manufacturing defect or has
    been damaged.

    > Just like when they retire airplanes after 15 years, as to steel frames can last a long time given
    > its properties and if not abuse, normal riding with the usual bumpy road could last a life time.
    > These fact are bugging me a lot, I just came back from the LBS and lifted the Vigorelli (reynolds
    > 631)...man! very light for steel. not as light as the GIRO AL, but light......I don't know, I'm
    > inclining towards STEEL..... Corsaire

    low tensile steels fatigue above their endurance limit, high tensile steels don't have an endurance
    limit. tough choice isn't it!

    my opinion, fwiw, is that steel is abuse tolerant and tough. otoh, al can make a very strong, stable
    and light frame. it's a really hard choice. personally, i'm leaning towards al at this time because
    of my shimmy experiences with larger steel frames.

    jb
     
  6. root

    root Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Corsaire <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>With luck, you will live longer than the frame will take to wear out in your application.
    >>>>><<<<<<
    >
    >I'd only wish it was that easy but according to the technical data I've been reading over the net

    Heh.

    There are a lot of posters to the net who post, well, crap.

    >, the AL metal FATIGUE is a fact in a given time period, regardless of the best design, frame
    >geometry, etc etc, after so many (not talking bike abuse here) rides those little microscopic crack
    >in the Al will compound to a point where it'll fatigue and possibly crack the frame structure, it's
    >just a matter of time.

    Yes, that is true. But if you're only riding a few miles back and forth to work, that time is
    probably a centuries or two.

    Hence the last poster's comment.

    > Just like when they retire airplanes after 15 years, as to steel frames can last a long time given
    > its properties and if not abuse, normal riding with the usual bumpy road could last a life time.
    > These fact are bugging me a lot, I just came back from the LBS and lifted the Vigorelli (reynolds
    > 631)...man! very light for steel. not as light as the GIRO AL, but light......I don't know, I'm
    > inclining towards STEEL..... Corsaire

    The Vigorelli's a nice bike. My wife loves hers. The extra pound or whatever it weighs over the alu
    frame won't be noticed. Especially for commuting.

    But if you like ride of the Alu frame, buy it.

    Eric
     
  7. Corsaire

    Corsaire New Member

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    >>>The Vigorelli's a nice bike. My wife loves hers. The extra pound or whatever it weighs over the alu
    frame won't be noticed. Especially for commuting.

    But if you like ride of the Alu frame, buy it.<<<<<<<

    Eric [/B][/QUOTE]

    Thanks a lot guys for the advice, I guess I'll go for whatever feels 'right' at the moment of test/riding the bike, be it Al or steel:
    I'll just "close my eyes", metal blind and F-E-E-L the bike, the one that 'blends' with me, that I will buy.
    Corsaire ;)
     
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