Buying a light touring bicycle

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by aperezy, Feb 9, 2017.

  1. aperezy

    aperezy New Member

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    I am a road biker and last year I did my first tour, about 400 miles. I used an old mountain bicycle that I have but the experience was not pleasant.

    I am looking to purchase a new bike for light touring. My Fuji Altamira Is not suitable for this. I am debating between a Trek Crosstip, Fuji Jari, Kona Roveand Specialized Sequoia. All these bikes are City/Gravel bicycles and I think will fit my needs (light touring, motels, light cargo)

    Now my big doubt is the Chainring options. My selection are gravel/city Bicycles and the chainring are double (Compact and Subcompact) with the exception of the Crossrip 2016 that has a triple 50/39/30. Some uses a new SubCompact chainring I don't know enough the technical difference between compact and subcompact, what I am concern is not having the grannie gear, specially for hills when the bicycle is loaded.

    Is it worth the subcompact options 48/32? or in other words this 48/32 is enough for steep hills and long rolling hills?

    Thank you all
    Alfredo
     
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  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    First off for really steep hills you don't want a single speed crankset unless you're very strong, so that eliminates the Fuji and the Kona. The other thing is some of the frames are what I think as being oddly designed and due to those odd design should be more prone to failure, not saying that they would fail but the design adds that potential. Look at the Kona rear dropout, it's very small piece of steel or aluminum there and doesn't appear to be strong enough in my opinion; whereas the Trek looks to be the beefiest of the bikes you mentioned. Plus the Trek has the triple chainring system which is much better suited for touring.

    Another few options is Masi Giramondo, the Kona Sutra, if none of those appeal to you then I think the Trek is the best one.

    Again, this was just my opinion be it right or wrong, I'm not really into that sort of biking, but from what I read on the internet the Trek Crossrip seems to check all the boxes you wanted plus has a triple chainring which is idea for real steep climbs, even the fork has the ability to put a rack on if you ever want to use it for heavier touring; the only thing it doesn't have, which isn't a deal breaker, is a third bottle holder, but you can buy a bottle holder bracket and install a 3rd that way. The Trek isn't very heavy for this sort of bike, at 22 pounds it's pretty light, my touring bike weighs 25.8 pounds.
     
  3. aperezy

    aperezy New Member

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    Thanks for your time an answer. I did a more analysis and the Fuji Jari 1.7 has a great gearing option. It has a double subcompact chainring with 11 speed cassette (similar as a mountain bike) and it is comparable with the third gear of the Trek. I am learning about gear technical aspects and a think this is a good one, and price wise also fits into my budget and weight also looks good. Here is the link and let me know if you have a comment

    http://www.fujibikes.com/usa/bikes/road/adventure-and-touring/jari/jari-1-7

    I am trying to keep myself away from heavy touring bikes, my goal is short (week) and a light cargo tours

    I will check your recomendations

    Thanks again and happy weekend
     
  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    All I do is short weekend tours myself, but someday I hope to do a longer trip and eventually a across America tour. Right now you say all you want to do is weekend tours, which is cool, but the problem is when you go out an tour a bug will eventually bite you and you'll come down with the tour fever and want to travel further, so with that possibility someday looming before you you may want to consider buying something now that could fulfill that role later without having to buy another bike to make it happen. Modern touring bikes are not all that heavy anyways, and with modern camping gear lighter than ever and getting lighter there is no need for heavy touring bikes anymore.
     
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