Buying a new bike, seeking advice

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by ldtmcfadden, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. ldtmcfadden

    ldtmcfadden New Member

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    Hi All,
    I am looking to upgrade from my Fuji Roubaix to something carbon. I have looked at a lot of things and have narrowed it down to a few. Please let me know what you think..... I would like to keep it under $2000. I used to race, but now i just ride for enjoyment and to keep in shape. I do not plan to race, but still would like a nice bike.

    2009 Fuji Team. There sems to be a lot of good deals on this bike right now, have seen it for under $1500

    2009 Schwinn Paramount Series 8. Looks like a real nice bike with SRAM Rival components and Mavik Aksium wheels. Foundd it at my local bike shop for $2000-seems like a very good deal.

    2010 Trek Madone 4.5. No deals on this one, but a really nice bike.


    I am open to suggestions.
    Thanks in advance
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    They're all good bikes. Did you ride any of them? Riding them will tell you which one you should buy.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    With the understanding that a lot of things don't make sense to me, just exactly why did you want to abandon your Fuji Roubaix for a full CF framed bike?

    Did you want a marginally lighter bike?

    OR, do you think that the CF frame will truly make a difference in the way the bike will ride?

    Is it that you don't like the shifters on your Fuji?

    Did you really want to handicap your next bike with SRAM shifters?

    OR, was it some other reason?

    FWIW. If I had a Fuji Roubaix and wanted a marginally different riding experience, then I would probably buy a GUNNAR road frame & use the components which are the Fuji ... eventually (actually, ASAP!), I would switch the shifters for a pair of non-QS, 10-speed Campagnolo shifters & lace up a new pair of 32h wheels on a pair of Ultegra hubs.

    Heck, maybe you should just change the current shifters on your current Fuji ... the fore mentioned 10-speed Campagnolo shifters will mate with both 9-and-10-speed Shimano drivetrains (with 9-speed derailleurs/cassettes, you need to use the hubbub.com alternate rear derailleur cable anchoring to achieve optimal indexing ... it's free!).
     
  4. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    The one that fits the best. Outside of that, here are some of the impressions I've garnered--Team Pro, great bike for the money, comfortable, stiff, but somewhat dead-feeling; Paramount, many reports of pleasant surprise; Madone 4, nearly everyone who steps up to this falls in love with it, except for the saddle.

    In the econo-carbon category, be sure to see the offerings from Giant, Cannondale, Scott, and Felt if they're available in your area.

    Ride before buying.
     
  5. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    ride em let your butt decide, (keep in mind- if you buy from a good shop you get help advice etc, you can't get with money)
     
  6. ToffoIsMe

    ToffoIsMe New Member

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    From my experience, the Madone will offer a livelier feel than the Fuji and also offer a bit more stiffness. I am personally not a big fan of Fuji's frames as I think that the bottom bracket area flexes a bit more then it should on both their aluminum and carbon bikes. The Trek will offer a nicer frame platform, but you may not get as much bang for your buck as you will with the Fuji. Fuji's bikes tend to be relatively well spec'ed for their prices.

    Although, if the frame's geometry does not agree with your body, then the whole stiffness/liveliness thing doesn't really matter. Inquire about doing a decent length test ride with each bike and then make a decision from there. Some shops will let you demo a bike during one of their group rides (where they can make sure the bike is safe). Fuji is generally pretty good with offering demo bikes to shops, too, in order to keep them from having to use their own stock. They will sometimes even allow the bikes to be demo'ed for a week or so (depending on how tight the shop management is with their Fuji rep). Trek tends to be a little bit tougher to acquire a demo bike from, but it never hurts to ask your salesman to contact their rep about it.
     
  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Any of those bikes will be plenty stiff enough.
     
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