Buying Canadian parts from the US question:

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Slacker, Feb 20, 2003.

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  1. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?

    Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?

    --
    Slacker
     
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  2. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Slacker wrote:
    > Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    >
    > Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?

    I order other stuff by mail and in my experience I haven't had to pay duties on the non-big dollar
    stuff. You can look up the duty and taxes on one of the .gov sites. If I buy WHILE I am up there,
    (smaller stuff) I just carry it back with me.

    Penny
     
  3. Chas

    Chas Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    >
    > Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?
    >
    > --
    > Slacker
    >
    >
    >
    >

    The Technical answer is that when any international shipment arrives in the US you are suppose to
    declare, to US Customs, the value and a HTS code (classification of the goods) that tells what
    percentage rate the duty should be. Customs can accept this, take your money, and release the
    shipment or argue the value and/or duty rate or hold your package for inspection for all that
    illegal stuff your smuggling. Usually you pay a broker to fill out and submit all the paperwork for
    you and arrange duty payment with customs.

    The way this would be handled by a Canadian bike shop selling you something, is by shipping to you
    using FedEx or UPS. Both FedEx and UPS will act as a broker and add their broker fees and the duty
    charges into their freight bill. The shop can pre-calculate these charges and include them in your
    bill with them or have the shipment sent freight collect (including these other charges). Just
    because you may not SEE these charges don't mean you haven't paid them somehow.

    Trust me no commercial freight enters the US without clearing customs, that's what smuggling is and
    UPS or FedEx aren't going to risk that and neither would any business. As far as the US Government
    is concerned, no matter who or how or how much you paid for something, you do not own it until
    you've paid the duty and cleared it through customs. Now there are items that are duty free between
    countries (remember all that NAFTA free trade agreement stuff), but a broker must still fill out the
    paperwork. Remember Customs is part of the same department as the IRS, you have to file taxes even
    if you don't owe anything. If you are carrying it across the border yourself, customs most often
    realize that they don't have the time to stop everyone collect money and fill out paperwork for
    small ticket items and I think there is a $200.00 limit that you are allowed without duty, I may be
    wrong on this.

    No you know enough to get a job as Broker.

    --
    Chas Spaz <[email protected]
     
  4. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > > Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    > >
    > > Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Slacker
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > The Technical answer is that when any international shipment arrives in the US you are suppose to
    > declare, to US Customs, the value and a HTS code (classification of the goods) that tells what
    > percentage rate the duty should be. Customs can accept this, take your money, and release the
    > shipment or argue the value and/or duty rate or hold your package for inspection for all that
    > illegal stuff your smuggling. Usually you pay a broker to fill out and submit all the paperwork
    > for you and arrange duty payment with customs.
    >
    > The way this would be handled by a Canadian bike shop selling you something, is by shipping to you
    > using FedEx or UPS. Both FedEx and UPS will act as a broker and add their broker fees and the duty
    > charges into their freight bill. The shop can pre-calculate these charges and include them in your
    > bill with them or have the shipment sent freight collect (including these other charges). Just
    > because you may not SEE these charges don't mean you haven't paid them somehow.
    >
    > Trust me no commercial freight enters the US without clearing customs, that's what smuggling is
    > and UPS or FedEx aren't going to risk that and neither would any business. As far as the US
    > Government is concerned, no matter who or how or how much you paid for something, you do not own
    > it until you've paid the duty and cleared it through customs. Now there are items that are duty
    > free between countries (remember all that NAFTA free trade agreement stuff), but a broker must
    > still fill out the paperwork. Remember Customs is part of the same department as the IRS, you have
    > to file taxes even if you don't owe anything. If you are carrying it across the border yourself,
    > customs most often realize that they don't have the time to stop everyone collect money and fill
    > out paperwork for small ticket items and I think there is a $200.00 limit that you are allowed
    > without duty, I may be wrong on this.
    >
    > No you know enough to get a job as Broker.
    >
    > --
    > Chas Spaz <[email protected]>

    Dang, much appreciated!!! Now that's info.

    I remember hearing about stuff getting hung-up in Customs before. The Canadian distributor I'm
    buying from is shipping the goods FedEx (on the US side) and I forgot who the Canadian shipping
    company was. You're absolutely correct about UPS/FedEx acting as a broker; I forgot that we've used
    them at my work.

    I made an arrangement for the distributor to pay for the all shipping/tax costs, but I wanted to
    make sure I'm not going to get stuck with some unforeseen fee and my body armor held hostage
    somewhere in Kansas!

    Thanks again!
    --
    Slacker
     
  5. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Chas wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >> Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    >>
    >> Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Slacker
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    > The Technical answer is that when any international shipment arrives in the US you are suppose to
    > declare, to US Customs, the value and a HTS code (classification of the goods) that tells what
    > percentage rate the duty should be.

    <yawn big snip>

    all this is true IF your declared value is OVER a certain amount. If it's under it can be dropped
    off into your mail box with the declaration form intact. Other wise the shipper will hold it hostage
    unless you have squared it up. I've purchased opals from Australia ( limit $400, opals are good deal
    right now guys) and had them drop shipped, fabrics from Canada, (for personal use) drop shipped,
    clothing from Canada (for personal use) , dropped shipped. The only time i've dealt with custom
    brokers is when I've done sksi patrol unifrom orders with a Canadian value of over $12000 Then I
    used a custom brokers to handle evertyhing, including NAFTA considerations.

    what you need to know is what the limit is on bike parts for personal use before you have to pay
    duty, and then just order less than that. You can break it into more than one shipment.

    quote from the site re internet purchases;
    http://www.customs.gov/xp/cgov/import/infrequent_importer_info/internet_purc hases.xml#personal
    Informal Entries: If the value of your purchase(s) is less than $2000 and your goods are being
    shipped by mail or freight, they may, in most cases, be imported as an informal entry. However,
    there are exceptions to this. For instance, if the importation is determined to be for commercial
    purposes, the value limit for filing an informal entry for many textile items is either $250 or $0 -
    depending on whether or not the item is subject to Quota (see below). Clearing goods through Customs
    as an informal entry is less arduous a process than clearing them by filing a formal entry.
    Essentially, when goods are cleared as an informal entry, Customs will prepare the paperwork,
    including determining the classification number and duty rate for your merchandise.

    also: Packages whose declared value is under $200 ($100 if being sent as a gift to someone other
    than the purchaser) will generally be cleared without any additional paperwork prepared by Customs.
    However, Customs always reserves the right to require a formal entry for any importation and
    generally exercises this option if there is something unusual about the importation, or if important
    documents such as an invoice or bill of sale do not accompany the item.

    unless you are spending lots of $$ or bringing something in that's on a flagged list, there's no
    reason that it can't be dropped off at your front door.

    Penny
     
  6. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Slacker wrote:
    > I remember hearing about stuff getting hung-up in Customs before. The Canadian distributor I'm
    > buying from is shipping the goods FedEx (on the US side) and I forgot who the Canadian shipping
    > company was. You're absolutely correct about UPS/FedEx acting as a broker; I forgot that we've
    > used them at my work.
    >
    > I made an arrangement for the distributor to pay for the all shipping/tax costs, but I wanted to
    > make sure I'm not going to get stuck with some unforeseen fee and my body armor held hostage
    > somewhere in Kansas!
    >
    > Thanks again!

    all you ordered is body armor? that should be no problem to have mailed in.

    penny
     
  7. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Chas wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected].net>,
    > > [email protected] says...
    > >> Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    > >>
    > >> Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Slacker
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > > The Technical answer is that when any international shipment arrives in the US you are suppose
    > > to declare, to US Customs, the value and a HTS code (classification of the goods) that tells
    > > what percentage rate the duty should be.
    >
    > <yawn big snip>
    >
    > all this is true IF your declared value is OVER a certain amount. If it's under it can be dropped
    > off into your mail box with the declaration form intact. Other wise the shipper will hold it
    > hostage unless you have squared it up. I've purchased opals from Australia ( limit $400, opals are
    > good deal right now guys) and had them drop shipped, fabrics from Canada, (for personal use) drop
    > shipped, clothing from Canada (for personal use) , dropped shipped. The only time i've dealt with
    > custom brokers is when I've done sksi patrol unifrom orders with a Canadian value of over $12000
    > Then I used a custom brokers to handle evertyhing, including NAFTA considerations.
    >
    > what you need to know is what the limit is on bike parts for personal use before you have to pay
    > duty, and then just order less than that. You can break it into more than one shipment.
    >
    > quote from the site re internet purchases;
    > http://www.customs.gov/xp/cgov/import/infrequent_importer_info/internet_purc hases.xml#personal
    > Informal Entries: If the value of your purchase(s) is less than $2000 and your goods are being
    > shipped by mail or freight, they may, in most cases, be imported as an informal entry. However,
    > there are exceptions to this. For instance, if the importation is determined to be for commercial
    > purposes, the value limit for filing an informal entry for many textile items is either $250 or $0
    > - depending on whether or not the item is subject to Quota (see below). Clearing goods through
    > Customs as an informal entry is less arduous a process than clearing them by filing a formal
    > entry. Essentially, when goods are cleared as an informal entry, Customs will prepare the
    > paperwork, including determining the classification number and duty rate for your merchandise.
    >
    >
    > also: Packages whose declared value is under $200 ($100 if being sent as a gift to someone other
    > than the purchaser) will generally be cleared without any additional paperwork prepared by
    > Customs. However, Customs always reserves the right to require a formal entry for any importation
    > and generally exercises this option if there is something unusual about the importation, or if
    > important documents such as an invoice or bill of sale do not accompany the item.
    >
    > unless you are spending lots of $$ or bringing something in that's on a flagged list, there's no
    > reason that it can't be dropped off at your front door.
    >
    > Penny

    Good info Penny, thanks!

    But I don't think I would want $368 in gear "dropped off at my front door."
    --
    Slacker - this aint your little chicken wings stuff ;^ )
     
  8. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Slacker wrote:>>

    http://www.customs.gov/xp/cgov/import/infrequent_importer_info/internet_purc hases.xml#personal

    >>
    unless you are spending lots of $$ or bringing something in that's
    >> on a flagged list, there's no reason that it can't be dropped off at your front door.
    >>
    >> Penny
    >
    >
    > Good info Penny, thanks!
    >
    > But I don't think I would want $368 in gear "dropped off at my front door."

    That's what you get for living in SoCal.
     
  9. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Slacker wrote:>>
    >
    > http://www.customs.gov/xp/cgov/import/infrequent_importer_info/internet_purc hases.xml#personal
    >
    > >>
    > unless you are spending lots of $$ or bringing something in that's
    > >> on a flagged list, there's no reason that it can't be dropped off at your front door.
    > >>
    > >> Penny
    > >
    > >
    > > Good info Penny, thanks!
    > >
    > > But I don't think I would want $368 in gear "dropped off at my front door."
    >
    > That's what you get for living in SoCal.

    Very true....had a coffee mug stolen not too long ago.
    --
    Slacker
     
  10. David L

    David L Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    >
    > Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?
    >
    > --
    > Slacker
    >
    >
    >

    Is it the same the opposite way from an online vendor such as jensonUSA> to Canada?

    TIA,

    Dave
     
  11. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > --
    > Slacker - this aint your little chicken wings stuff ;^ )
    >

    HEY!!!!! I resemble that remark!!!!

    Mike - Any time yer ready Bwoy!
     
  12. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    >
    > Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?

    I am going up there next week, what do you need? :)

    - CA-G

    Canadian Girls Kick Ass!
     
  13. Jan Sacharuk

    Jan Sacharuk Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Slacker wrote:
    > Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    >
    > Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?

    All the answers you got were good, but also keep in mind that if you buy goods that are made in the
    US or Canada (or Mexico), free trade rules kick in, and you aren't supposed to pay any duty at all.
    It works both ways across the border. So if you can find the stuff you want from Core Rat or Cove
    or whatever, you should be able to declare, prove that it was made in Canada, and not pay any duty
    at all. That should apply for shipped goods as well, though you may have to pay the duty at the
    border when shipping, then take it back for a refund. I'm not sure how that works. In any case,
    check the free trade laws. I may be a bit fuzzy on exactly how it works, but I think that's more or
    less correct.

    JS

    --
    ========================= [email protected] ========================
    Jan Sacharuk Member in Good Standing of The Discordian Solidarity Turn on viewing of the X-Geek-Code
    header to see my Geek Code
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    I'm not like them, but I can pretend. The sun has gone, but I have
    a light. The day is done, but I'm having fun. I think I'm dumb,
    or maybe just happy. - Nirvana, Dumb
     
  14. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    slacker, where are you ordering from?

    P.
     
  15. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

  16. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Anyone here (USA) ever purchased bike parts from a shop located in Canada?
    > >
    > > Are there any fees/taxes are involved (other than shipping)?
    >
    > I am going up there next week, what do you need? :)
    >
    > - CA-G
    >
    > Canadian Girls Kick Ass!

    Thanks for the thought, but I already ordered my gear.
    --
    Slacker
     
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