Buying first road bike (6'2, 180lbs)



gaddcu

New Member
Jan 6, 2014
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I am looking to buy my first road bike. I borrowed a fiend's old (8 years or more) road bike to complete my first Sprint Tri. this past year. It was a blast and I plan to continue to do 2-3 tri's a year. Most will either be Sprint or Olympic distances, but I do plan to complete a Half Ironman in the next couple years. I think I will also look to do other road races as well.

I am looking at a Diamondback Etape (http://www.diamondback.com/bikes-pavement-road-competition-road-podium-etape).

Would you mind giving me your thoughts on this bike? I have no real frame of references so any info will be good for me.

I have been sized to a 60cm frame on a Trek Domane at a bike shop up in Asheville, NC, but as I understand it the Domane is a different type of frame (more "endurance" focused) so the geometry is not the same. With that said, I am not sure that a 60cm Diamondback Etape would fit me the same. Also, without an real experience I'm not sure the "endurance" vs. "competition" label means much to me.

I would love to try out the Diamondback but I cannot find any shops in my area (Grayson, GA) that have that bike on hand. The catch is, I can get that bike 50% so I'm guessing it will get me the most bang form buck.

Thanks you.
 

PoorInRichfield

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Jan 1, 2014
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I was wondering why you were interested in the Diamondback until I saw the "I can get 50% off..." part. PerformanceBike.com is selling the bike for $2,300, so you're saying you can get it for $1,150? If that's the case, go for it. I don't see how you'd get a new, Shimano 105 equipped, carbon framed bike anywhere else for less.

You'll probably want to get some clip-on aero bars for doing triathlons, but other than that, it looks like a really nice bike to me.

As for the size, I'm surprised you weren't fitted for a 58 cm. I'm 6'1", 165 lbs, and just bought a 2014 Trek Domane. I purchased a 56 cm because I was between sizes (56/58). I'm certainly at the limits of the 56 cm, at least as far as the seat post is concerned, but other than that, I don't have any fitment issues. My other road bikes have always been 58 cm, however.

You could always try Competitive Cyclist's fit calculator and see what they say:

http://www.competitivecyclist.com/Store/catalog/fitCalculatorBike.jsp?INT_ID=IB12809
 

oldbobcat

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2003
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Where does the OP state his height?

For sizing purposes, the "type" of frame should not be of prime importance, but some brands run larger or smaller than others. This would indicate sizing up or down if you're a boarderline size.

Try some online fit calculators. One problem with them is they cans suggest a custom-only build, such as in my case, 60 cm with a 57 cm top tube. They also don't factor in your posture on the bike. Get sized in a couple shops, too, and listen to what they say with a critical ear.
 

steve

Administrator
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Aug 12, 2001
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Originally Posted by oldbobcat
Where does the OP state his height?
It's in the subject of the thread. My initial thoughts was a 60cm frame might be to big, i'm no fitting expert though.
 

mpre53

Well-Known Member
Feb 20, 2013
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6'2" isn't the same for everyone. I'm 6'2", but I have a 32" inseam and wear a 32 sleeve. Shorter limbs, longer torso. That affects fit as much as one's height.
 

oldbobcat

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Aug 31, 2003
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Originally Posted by steve

It's in the subject of the thread. My initial thoughts was a 60cm frame might be to big, i'm no fitting expert though.
Thanks. It all depends on whose 60 we're talking about.

Fit seems to be going through another paradigm shift over the last couple of years, and the way you prefer to sit on the bike probably has more to do with it than in the past.

When I started riding in the early '70s most riders got the largest size they could straddle comfortably, and being too stretched out over the top tube wasn't a problem for most because top tubes and stems on non-competitive bikes were pretty short.

By the end of the '80s top tubes got longer to emulate the bikes and flat-backed postures of the racing heroes of the day. Many riders had to respond by sizing down or using shorter stems.

Around the mid-2000s, head tubes got taller and top tubes a little to considerably shorter, to accommodate non-competitive riders. Then, as of the last few years, there seems to be a trend toward shorter reach. Pro racers are sizing down again, but using long, low stems (and in many cases narrower handlebars) to keep a small frontal area; recreational riders are sizing down and using tall head tubes and riser stems to obtain an even more upright posture.

Sometime really soon I'll be getting a Retul fitting. I'll let everybody know what it changes.
 

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