buying first road bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by B Eldridge, May 11, 2003.

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  1. B Eldridge

    B Eldridge Guest

    I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for $1600.
    Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300, 2002 for
    $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great and seems to
    give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get used to the road
    posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models would be appreciated.
     
    Tags:


  2. > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get used
    > to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models would be
    > appreciated.

    One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the expertise of one dealer and another
    in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If, so far, you've just been tossed a bike with someone
    saying "Let's have you stand over this and see how it fits" and sending you out the door, you do
    *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.

    You should check out this article on our website-

    http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm

    It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral; it simply tells you how a bike
    should be set up for the test ride (which helps you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you
    ought to look for as you ride.

    One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never be
    happy with what you've found. Too many options can turn you into a professional searcher, and
    there will *always* be something else you haven't tried yet. You need to get past that and get
    into riding!

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (B
    Eldridge) wrote:

    > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get used
    > to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models would be
    > appreciated.

    Fit is your friend. Find the shop and the bike that fit you the best. The shop's duty is to make
    sure that they replace or adjust the stem, and seat (and maybe bars, cranks, and seatpost in extreme
    cases) so that you are ideally comfortable on the bike.

    In the price range you are shopping, there are basically no bad bikes, only bikes that fit and feel
    good, and bikes that do not. I hold the rather extreme opinion that frames are just simple devices
    that keep the components the right distance from each other: buy the cheapest, best-fitting
    "component hanger" and you will be fine.

    This is not to say there aren't advantages to, say, Ti vs. Al or any other material, but it seems to
    reside more in a combination of weight, aesthetics and minor durability issues (mostly revolving
    around Ti's resistance to corrosion).

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  4. > In the price range you are shopping, there are basically no bad bikes, only bikes that fit and
    > feel good, and bikes that do not. I hold the rather extreme opinion that frames are just simple
    > devices that keep the components the right distance from each other: buy the cheapest,
    > best-fitting "component hanger" and you will be fine.

    To which I must disagree, rather strongly. All frames are not created equal. We have the opportunity
    at our shop to ride identical geometries with identical components, just differing frame materials.
    Within just one brand of bike the differences are striking. Even durability of frames is sometimes
    dramatically different from one name-brand product to another.

    A certain manufacturer supplied a local road team with their bikes at a good price (an offer most on
    the team couldn't refuse). This was a stock frame found on their production bikes. Sample size was
    greater than 10, failure rate over 80% in less than one year. All due to a badly-placed hole drilled
    into the frame for some reason or other (water to exit?). The point is that there are vastly
    different ways that companies go about designing and testing (if they test at all) product before it
    gets to the customer. That just covers qualitative differences from one brand to another. Ride
    differences will exist as well, although many here will say that you could build a frame from lead
    pipe or carbon and it would ride exactly the same if you managed to make the weight even close.

    Having said all that, a moderate bike that fits great will always trump a high-end bike that
    fits poorly.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  5. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "B Eldridge" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get used
    > to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models would be
    > appreciated.
    >

    Shop for a bike shop first and then let them help you select a bike. Brand is unimportant, since
    most are very close and competetive in terms of price and performance. The big difference is in the
    shops/owners/employees. A good deal on a good bike ain't nothin' without an intelligent, reasonable
    staff to hook you up and back it up.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  6. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get
    > > used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models
    > > would be appreciated.
    >
    > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the expertise
    of
    > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If, so far, you've just been
    > tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have you stand over this and see how it fits" and sending
    > you out the door, you do *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    >
    > You should check out this article on our website-
    >
    > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    >
    > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral; it simply tells you how a
    > bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    helps
    > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as you ride.
    >
    > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never be
    > happy with what you've found. Too many options can turn you into a professional searcher, and
    > there will *always* be something else you haven't tried yet. You need to get past that and get
    > into riding!
    >

    I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In our
    shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike they're buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been
    happy with the way their new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not getting
    caught up in all the test riding.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  7. Joel Rose

    Joel Rose Guest

    I've been there - got a great deal on a GREAT bike, but the shop basically let me walk out the door
    with it. They were in the process of learning a new fit system and until this day(purchased in
    Jan.), they have yet to get their s**t together. I have now paid another shop for a fit and what a
    difference!!

    My simple advice would be to find the right bike, but first and foremost find a shop that knows what
    they are doing!

    My 2 cents, Joel "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "B Eldridge" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get
    > > used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models
    > > would be appreciated.
    > >
    >
    > Shop for a bike shop first and then let them help you select a bike.
    Brand
    > is unimportant, since most are very close and competetive in terms of
    price
    > and performance. The big difference is in the shops/owners/employees. A good deal on a good bike
    > ain't nothin' without an intelligent, reasonable staff to hook you up and back it up.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Robin Hubert <[email protected]>
     
  8. > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In our
    > shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike they're buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been
    > happy with the way their new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    getting
    > caught up in all the test riding.

    Doesn't work for me. I want to get the customer as familiar as possible with gears & brakes, not to
    mention field questions on comfort issues, before they hit the road. A lot of people are easily
    discouraged by little things, and embarrassed to admit to them. So they get their new bike, try it
    around the block and discover they don't quite understand the gears. And they're reluctant to bring
    it back to the shop because they figure it will make them look stupid because it's probably
    something really simple. So what happens? The bike sits in the garage forever.

    Before they go out on a real test ride, I take them out to the parking lot and watch them ride
    around for a minute or two... even people who claim they know what they're doing. Amazing how many
    don't actually understand the real mechanics of shifting (especially for the front derailleur, which
    requires that you actually hold the lever in place for a moment when shifting from a smaller
    chainring to a larger one).

    As far as everyone being happy, that's everyone that you know of. The ones that worry me are the
    ones you never hear from. How many people buy things that have problems, and, instead of returning
    them, figure it's something wrong with them, not the product, and figure it was just a very
    expensive lesson to them (that they shouldn't have bought a bike in the first place)?

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > > > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > > > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek
    > > > 2300, 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and
    > > > feels great and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit
    > > > hard to get used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these
    > > > brands/Models would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the expertise
    > of
    > > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If, so far, you've just been
    > > tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have you stand over this and see how it fits" and
    > > sending you out the door, you
    do
    > > *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    > >
    > > You should check out this article on our website-
    > >
    > > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    > >
    > > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral; it simply tells you how a
    > > bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    > helps
    > > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as
    you
    > > ride.
    > >
    > > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never be
    > > happy with what you've found. Too many
    options
    > > can turn you into a professional searcher, and there will *always* be something else you haven't
    > > tried yet. You need to get past that and get into riding!
    > >
    >
    > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In our
    > shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike they're buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been
    > happy with the way their new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    getting
    > caught up in all the test riding.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Robin Hubert <[email protected]>
     
  9. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > > > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > > > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek
    > > > 2300, 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and
    > > > feels great and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit
    > > > hard to get used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these
    > > > brands/Models would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the expertise
    > of
    > > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If, so far, you've just been
    > > tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have you stand over this and see how it fits" and
    > > sending you out the door, you do *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    > >
    > > You should check out this article on our website-
    > >
    > > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    > >
    > > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral; it simply tells you how a
    > > bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    > helps
    > > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as you ride.
    > >
    > > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never be
    > > happy with what you've found. Too many options can turn you into a professional searcher, and
    > > there will *always* be something else you haven't tried yet. You need to get past that and get
    > > into riding!
    > >
    >
    > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In our
    > shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike they're buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been
    > happy with the way their new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    > getting caught up in all the test riding.

    If your shop doesn't allow "test rides", does your shop do any kind of "fitting"? That is, do you do
    any sort of measurement of the individual to determine things like top tube length, stem length and
    height, crank length? The lbs I use measures all buyers on a serotta fit cycle and determines what
    size bike they needbased on that measurement and the type of riding the buyer intends to do. The
    cost for this fitting session is around $25 or so. Of course, if the buyer buys a bike the cost of
    the fitting is included. Finally, after riding the bike, the shop will swap out things like
    stems/seats to "adjust the fit" to the buyer....
     
  10. Also check out the Lemond Alpe D'Huez. Don't know where you are, but a local shop where I live (the
    only decent shop for road bikes in my area actually), is selling the 2002 Lemond Alpe D'Huez for
    $1000; a very good deal. I'm tempted, but I'd be in big trouble if I came home with another bike
    (more trouble than if I came home with another woman!).

    "http://chainreaction.com/lemond.htm"

    Whatever you buy, avoid aluminum frames and stick with Cro-Mo; You want a bike that you can ride for
    many, many years to come. The Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo would be fine. I'd avoid the Treks with
    the aluminum (ZR9000) frame, and avoid the Raleigh. It's almost amusing how Trek is afraid to even
    mention that ZR9000 is actually aluminum!

    Your price range is too low for Carbon-Fiber or Titanium, so Cro-Mo is the best choice. Components
    can always be changed or replaced, but the frame will be with you for the life of the bike.

    [email protected] (B Eldridge) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get used
    > to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models would be
    > appreciated.
     
  11. Hawke

    Hawke Guest

    From: "bfd" <[email protected]> Subject: Re: buying first road bike Date: Monday, May 12,
    2003 11:03 AM

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > > > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > > > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek
    > > > 2300, 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and
    > > > feels great and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit
    > > > hard to get used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these
    > > > brands/Models would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the expertise
    > of
    > > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If, so far, you've just been
    > > tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have you stand over this and see how it fits" and
    > > sending you out the door, you
    do
    > > *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    > >
    > > You should check out this article on our website-
    > >
    > > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    > >
    > > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral; it simply tells you how a
    > > bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    > helps
    > > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as
    you
    > > ride.
    > >
    > > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never be
    > > happy with what you've found. Too many
    options
    > > can turn you into a professional searcher, and there will *always* be something else you haven't
    > > tried yet. You need to get past that and get into riding!
    > >
    >
    > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In our
    > shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike they're buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been
    > happy with the way their new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    getting
    > caught up in all the test riding.

    If your shop doesn't allow "test rides", does your shop do any kind of "fitting"? That is, do you do
    any sort of measurement of the individual to determine things like top tube length, stem length and
    height, crank length? The lbs I use measures all buyers on a serotta fit cycle and determines what
    size bike they needbased on that measurement and the type of riding the buyer intends to do. The
    cost for this fitting session is around $25 or so. Of course, if the buyer buys a bike the cost of
    the fitting is included. Finally, after riding the bike, the shop will swap out things like
    stems/seats to "adjust the fit" to the buyer....

    Nah he doesn't do anything except take their money.

    Hawke
     
  12. Hawke

    Hawke Guest

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "B Eldridge" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get
    > > used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models
    > > would be appreciated.
    > >
    >
    > Shop for a bike shop first and then let them help you select a bike.
    Brand
    > is unimportant, since most are very close and competetive in terms of
    price
    > and performance. The big difference is in the shops/owners/employees. A good deal on a good bike
    > ain't nothin' without an intelligent, reasonable staff to hook you up and back it up.

    Unless you are intelligent enough to find and purchase a nice bike on-line and set it up yourself.

    If you are not that intelligent then you may need a 19 year old bike "mechanic" to set up your
    bike for you.

    Hawke
     
  13. Hawke

    Hawke Guest

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > > > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > > > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek
    > > > 2300, 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and
    > > > feels great and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit
    > > > hard to get used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these
    > > > brands/Models would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the expertise
    > of
    > > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If, so far, you've just been
    > > tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have you stand over this and see how it fits" and
    > > sending you out the door, you
    do
    > > *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    > >
    > > You should check out this article on our website-
    > >
    > > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    > >
    > > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral; it simply tells you how a
    > > bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    > helps
    > > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as
    you
    > > ride.
    > >
    > > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never be
    > > happy with what you've found. Too many
    options
    > > can turn you into a professional searcher, and there will *always* be something else you haven't
    > > tried yet. You need to get past that and get into riding!
    > >
    >
    > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In our
    > shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike they're buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been
    > happy with the way their new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    getting
    > caught up in all the test riding.

    Self serving recommendation, that is bad advice.

    Hawke
     
  14. > Self serving recommendation, that is bad advice.

    I don't think it's even self-serving. If you get a customer more comfortable about the bike they're
    purchasing, they'll be more likely to buy more accessories. In my book, anything that can be done
    that removes intimidation is a good thing and helps the bottom line.

    Having said all that, I do recall coming across some very nice folk from a shop someplace in Chicago
    where test rides were apparently not very practical (traffic, road conditions and theft). They
    seemed to make up for it with relatively liberal policies about trading bikes in, but it really
    seemed odd to me. Old dogs, new tricks, maybe I just need to get with the program.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    "Hawke" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on
    > > > > the street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon
    > > > > fork for $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300.
    Also
    > > > > tried The Trek 2300, 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The
    > > > > Raliegh looks and feels great and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled
    > > > > similar, however a bit hard to get used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying
    advice
    > > > > to a newbie on these brands/Models would be appreciated.
    > > >
    > > > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the
    expertise
    > > of
    > > > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If,
    so
    > > > far, you've just been tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have
    you
    > > > stand over this and see how it fits" and sending you out the door, you
    > do
    > > > *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    > > >
    > > > You should check out this article on our website-
    > > >
    > > > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    > > >
    > > > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral;
    it
    > > > simply tells you how a bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    > > helps
    > > > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as
    > you
    > > > ride.
    > > >
    > > > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never
    > > > be happy with what you've found. Too many
    > options
    > > > can turn you into a professional searcher, and there will *always* be something else you
    > > > haven't tried yet. You need to get past that and
    get
    > > > into riding!
    > > >
    > >
    > > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In
    > > our shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike
    they're
    > > buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been happy with the way
    their
    > > new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    > getting
    > > caught up in all the test riding.
    >
    > Self serving recommendation, that is bad advice.
    >
    > Hawke
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Steven
    Scharf) wrote:

    > Also check out the Lemond Alpe D'Huez. Don't know where you are, but a local shop where I live
    > (the only decent shop for road bikes in my area actually), is selling the 2002 Lemond Alpe D'Huez
    > for $1000; a very good deal. I'm tempted, but I'd be in big trouble if I came home with another
    > bike (more trouble than if I came home with another woman!).
    >
    > "http://chainreaction.com/lemond.htm"
    >
    > Whatever you buy, avoid aluminum frames and stick with Cro-Mo; You want a bike that you can ride
    > for many, many years to come. The Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo would be fine. I'd avoid the
    > Treks with the aluminum (ZR9000) frame, and avoid the Raleigh. It's almost amusing how Trek is
    > afraid to even mention that ZR9000 is actually aluminum!

    What is this fear of Al about? it doesn't bite, and it usually builds into a lighter bike for the
    same or less money.

    I give you that steel is impressively magnetic, and I have a lugged steel Pinarello as my
    race/commute road bike. But I'm also quite happy riding my brother's Al MTB, though magnets won't
    stick to it.

    > Your price range is too low for Carbon-Fiber or Titanium, so Cro-Mo is the best choice. Components
    > can always be changed or replaced, but the frame will be with you for the life of the bike.

    Or, get the best collection of parts you can, and change the frame as is your pleasure. An Al road
    frame can be had for less than the price of a set of 105 brifteurs:

    http://www.nashbar.com/results.cfm?category=130&subcategory=1176&storetyp e=&init=y

    http://www.nashbar.com/results.cfm?category=104&subcategory=1194&storetyp e=&estoreid=&init=y

    typing angry, one arm in a sling,
    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  16. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "bfd" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on
    > > > > the street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon
    > > > > fork for $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300.
    Also
    > > > > tried The Trek 2300, 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The
    > > > > Raliegh looks and feels great and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled
    > > > > similar, however a bit hard to get used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying
    advice
    > > > > to a newbie on these brands/Models would be appreciated.
    > > >
    > > > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the
    expertise
    > > of
    > > > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If,
    so
    > > > far, you've just been tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have
    you
    > > > stand over this and see how it fits" and sending you out the door, you
    do
    > > > *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    > > >
    > > > You should check out this article on our website-
    > > >
    > > > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    > > >
    > > > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral;
    it
    > > > simply tells you how a bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    > > helps
    > > > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as
    you
    > > > ride.
    > > >
    > > > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never
    > > > be happy with what you've found. Too many
    options
    > > > can turn you into a professional searcher, and there will *always* be something else you
    > > > haven't tried yet. You need to get past that and
    get
    > > > into riding!
    > > >
    > >
    > > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In
    > > our shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike
    they're
    > > buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been happy with the way
    their
    > > new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    getting
    > > caught up in all the test riding.
    >
    > If your shop doesn't allow "test rides", does your shop do any kind of "fitting"? That is, do you
    > do any sort of measurement of the individual to determine things like top tube length, stem length
    > and height, crank length? The lbs I use measures all buyers on a serotta fit cycle and determines
    > what size bike they needbased on that measurement and the type of riding the buyer intends to do.
    > The cost for this fitting session is around $25 or so. Of course, if the buyer buys a bike the
    > cost of the fitting is included. Finally, after riding the bike, the shop will swap out things
    > like stems/seats to "adjust the fit" to the buyer....

    Yes, I do fittings on our ancient, modified Serotta sizer.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  17. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Hawke" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on
    > > > > the street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon
    > > > > fork for $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300.
    Also
    > > > > tried The Trek 2300, 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The
    > > > > Raliegh looks and feels great and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled
    > > > > similar, however a bit hard to get used to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying
    advice
    > > > > to a newbie on these brands/Models would be appreciated.
    > > >
    > > > One of the biggest differences you'll find will be between the
    expertise
    > > of
    > > > one dealer and another in terms of setting the bikes up for you. If,
    so
    > > > far, you've just been tossed a bike with someone saying "Let's have
    you
    > > > stand over this and see how it fits" and sending you out the door, you
    > do
    > > > *not* know how any of those bikes actually ride.
    > > >
    > > > You should check out this article on our website-
    > > >
    > > > http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm
    > > >
    > > > It's one of the few on our site that's both brand & material neutral;
    it
    > > > simply tells you how a bike should be set up for the test ride (which
    > > helps
    > > > you to evaluate the dealer as well) and what you ought to look for as
    > you
    > > > ride.
    > > >
    > > > One last note- you should narrow your search as quickly as possible; otherwise, you'll never
    > > > be happy with what you've found. Too many
    > options
    > > > can turn you into a professional searcher, and there will *always* be something else you
    > > > haven't tried yet. You need to get past that and
    get
    > > > into riding!
    > > >
    > >
    > > I think test riding bikes for newbies is confusing to them and serves no real good purpose. In
    > > our shop, no-one gets to test ride the bike
    they're
    > > buying, and everyone I've sold a bike to has been happy with the way
    their
    > > new bike rides. That's why I recommend finding a good shop and not
    > getting
    > > caught up in all the test riding.
    >
    > Self serving recommendation, that is bad advice.
    >

    FWIW, I guarantee the bike I sell will fit, if I size you.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]thlink.net
     
  18. A.C.

    A.C. Guest

    As another person mentioned check out the LeMonds - Alpe D'Huez or Buenos Aires. You can't go wrong
    with either. If you want a killer deal see if any local shops still have any '02 models. In Northen
    California shops were blowing them out $1000 for the Alpe and $1300 for the B.A. but stock is
    drying up.

    "B Eldridge" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am planning to purchase my first road bike after several years riding MTB and Hybrid on the
    > street. I have test driven the Raliegh Competition, all Ultrega and aluminum, carbon fork for
    > $1600. Specialized Allez Elite Cro-Mo, with 105 and carbon fork $1300. Also tried The Trek 2300,
    > 2002 for $1600.00 and want to test ride a similar Cannondale. The Raliegh looks and feels great
    > and seems to give the most for the money. They all handled similar, however a bit hard to get used
    > to the road posture from a hybrid. Any buying advice to a newbie on these brands/Models would be
    > appreciated.
     
  19. > If you are not that intelligent then you may need a 19 year old bike "mechanic" to set up your
    > bike for you.

    I take that as a light-hearted slam at the quality of bike mechanics in general, and 19-year-olds in
    particular. It may be true as a generalization, but I have known (and know of) 17, 18 & 19-year-old
    mechanics that take much greater pride in their work than people who have been around much longer,
    "mastering" their craft.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  20. "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:JYNva.68539

    > Shop for a bike shop first and then let them help you select a bike.
    Brand
    > is unimportant, since most are very close and competetive in terms of
    price
    > and performance. The big difference is in the shops/owners/employees. A good deal on a good bike
    > ain't nothin' without an intelligent, reasonable staff to hook you up and back it up.

    Brand may be unimportant, but there are big differences in how the bikes ride and how long they
    will last.

    If I were to buy a new road bike today, I'd spring for something like the Rivendell bicycles, just
    because the frame is so much better than what you get from Trek (or Trek-Lemond) or Specialized.
    Alas, most of the mass production bikes abandoned lugged frames because of the expense, so now they
    are a specialty item with even higher prices.

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_lugs.html

    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_romulusframes.html
     
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