C-Reactive Protein

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by J And B 50, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. J And B 50

    J And B 50 Guest

    I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    that my level was too high. His solution was to have me
    take 40mg. of Zocor daily. I was already taking 20mg. I had
    major abdominal surgery (aortic aneurysm repair) done 2/12
    weeks before the blood test. Doesn't surgery increase the
    CRP in the blood? Are there any other factors involved in a
    high reading?

    jim b.
     
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  2. Doe

    Doe Guest

    >Subject: C-Reactive Protein
    >From: [email protected] (J and b 50)
    >Date: 3/6/2004 11:35 AM Mountain Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    >that my level was too high. His solution was to have me
    >take 40mg. of Zocor daily. I was already taking 20mg. I had
    >major abdominal surgery (aortic aneurysm repair) done 2/12
    >weeks before the blood test. Doesn't surgery increase the
    >CRP in the blood? Are there any other factors involved in a
    >high reading?
    >
    >jim b.

    Elevated iron levels. Iron needs to be .. targeted.

    <<snip>> Future research needs to focus on preventive
    medicine to decrease iron in patients with elevated lipids.
    <<snip>> Am J Cardiol. 2004 Mar 1;93(5):559-62. Links

    Association of ferritin and lipids with C-reactive protein.

    Mainous AG 3rd, Wells BJ, Everett CJ, Gill JM, King DE.

    Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South
    Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipids (e.g., low-density
    lipoprotein [LDL]) are both markers of cardiovascular
    disease risk, yet they are not highly correlated. Oxidative
    stress of lipids induced by iron may play a role in vascular
    inflammation, as indicated by CRP. The purpose of this study
    was to examine, in a representative sample of United States
    adults, the relation between ferritin, lipids, and CRP. We
    analyzed data on adults (aged >/=25 years) in the National
    Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, a national public-
    use data set collected between 1988 and 1994. Ferritin,
    total cholesterol, LDL, high-density lipoprotein, and ferritin-
    lipid combinations were analyzed in relation to CRP in age-,
    gender-, and race-adjusted models as well as models with
    other potential confounding variables. In adjusted models,
    neither elevated ferritin (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95%
    confidence interval [CI] .94 to 1.32) nor elevated LDL was
    significantly associated with elevated CRP (OR 1.03, 95% CI
    0.79 to 1.33). Patients with elevated ferritin and elevated
    LDL were more likely to have elevated CRP (OR 1.68; 95% CI
    1.06 to 2.68). Patients with elevated ferritin and low high-
    density lipoprotein were also more likely to have elevated
    CRP (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.28 to 2.27). These results suggest
    that both iron and lipids induce inflammation. Future
    research needs to focus on preventive medicine to decrease
    iron in patients with elevated lipids.

    PMID: 14996579 [PubMed - in process]

    ------------------------------------------------------------
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    Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
    http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD
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  3. David Rind

    David Rind Guest

    J and b 50 wrote:
    > I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    > that my level was too high. His solution was to have me
    > take 40mg. of Zocor daily. I was already taking 20mg. I
    > had major abdominal surgery (aortic aneurysm repair) done
    > 2/12 weeks before the blood test. Doesn't surgery increase
    > the CRP in the blood? Are there any other factors involved
    > in a high reading?
    >
    > jim b.

    Yes, the surgery could have elevated the CRP level
    measurement a couple of weeks later. There is little solid
    evidence that treating to reduce CRP to a specific level is
    of benefit. The decision about what dose of a statin to use
    in a specific patient, and what target to aim for, is
    fairly complex, and it is possible that CRP should play
    into that decision.

    --
    David Rind [email protected]
     
  4. Anon

    Anon Guest

    On 2004-03-06 13:35:02 -0500, [email protected] (J and b 50) said:

    > I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    > that my level was too high.

    hsCRP is a nonspecific inflammatory marker that has been
    shown to correlate with increased cardiovascular risk. If an
    elevated level is obtained, it should be repeated four weeks
    later before basing treatment decisions on the results. Both
    results should be averaged. If a level of 10 or greater is
    obtained, it's noncardiac inflammation. hsCRP can be lowered
    by lifestyle modifications and aspirin as well as statins.
    Your doctor may have other reasons to recommend a statin.
     
  5. Doe

    Doe Guest

    >Subject: Re: C-Reactive Protein
    >From: anon [email protected]
    >Date: 3/6/2004 9:22 PM Mountain Standard Time
    >Message-id: <2004030623221675249%[email protected]>
    >
    >On 2004-03-06 13:35:02 -0500, [email protected] (J and b
    >50) said:
    >
    >> I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    >> that my level
    >was
    >> too high.
    >
    >hsCRP is a nonspecific inflammatory marker that has been
    >shown to correlate with increased cardiovascular risk.

    And since iron has been VERY recently been implicated in the
    'risk' of cardiovascular problems ..

    http://tinyurl.com/2ucgm

    >If an elevated level is obtained, it should be repeated
    >four weeks later before basing treatment decisions on the
    >results. Both results should be averaged. If a level of 10
    >or greater is obtained, it's noncardiac inflammation. hsCRP
    >can be lowered by lifestyle modifications and aspirin as
    >well as statins. Your doctor may have other reasons to
    >recommend a statin.

    Aspirin has been hypothesized to 'work' DUE TO its
    iron binding qualities .. production of ferritin an
    iron binder ..

    http://tinyurl.com/yv7rg

    Who loves ya. Tom Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
    http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore DEAD
    PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
  6. Anon

    Anon Guest

    On 2004-03-07 14:18:43 -0500, [email protected] (doe) said:

    >
    > Aspirin has been hypothesized to 'work' DUE TO its iron
    > binding qualities .. production of ferritin an iron
    > binder ..

    *Cough* (BULLSHIT!) *Cough*
     
  7. Anon

    Anon Guest

    On 2004-03-08 09:45:14 -0500, [email protected] (doe) said:

    > Just because the articles are .. old .. 'could' simply ..
    > mean .. YOU .. are NOT .. as UP on things as you seem to
    > want everyone to believe ..

    Look, I don't care *what* you believe. Bullshit is bullshit,
    even if *you* think it's true.

    The *real* mechanism of action of aspirin is not the
    "mystery" you seem to imply that it is. I'm not here to
    teach basic pharmacology, but then you'd know that if you
    read valid scientific literature instead of pseudo-
    scientific rubbish.
     
  8. Anon

    Anon Guest

    On 2004-03-09 09:46:02 -0500, [email protected] (doe) said:

    > Who loves ya.

    Not me, putz.
     
  9. >I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    >that my level was too high.

    Periodontal disease has been noted to increase C reative
    proteins. Have you had your dental exam recently?

    Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH "Everbody wants to save the
    earth - nobody wants to help Mom to do the dishes."
    - P. J. O'Rourke
    ~~~~~~~~~
    http://www.dentistry.com/poralhealth_02.asp
     
  10. Anon

    Anon Guest

    On 2004-03-06 13:35:02 -0500, [email protected] (J and b 50) said:

    Hopefully, he did an hsCRP, not a "regular" CRP. hs (high
    sensitivity) CRP is the cardiovascular risk marker. Before
    basing treatment decisions on hsCRP, it should be repeated
    in 4 weeks, and the two values should be averaged.
    Exceedingly high (>11) hsCRP values are almost certainly not
    elevated for cardiac reasons. The real impact of treating
    elevated hsCRP has not been determined, nor do we know if
    reducing hsCRP influences outcomes. All we know at this
    point is that hsCRP is one of several risk markers for
    cardiovascular disease. The clinical utility of hsCRP
    measurement and treatment needs to be taken in context with
    your other cardiovascular risk factors. Discuss this with
    your doctor.

    > I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    > that my level was too high. His solution was to have me
    > take 40mg. of Zocor daily. I was already taking 20mg. I
    > had major abdominal surgery (aortic aneurysm repair) done
    > 2/12 weeks before the blood test. Doesn't surgery increase
    > the CRP in the blood? Are there any other factors involved
    > in a high reading?
     
  11. Shirley Gutkowski RDH <[email protected]> wrote:
    : >I had a blood panel done recently, and the Dr.informed me
    : >that my level was too high.

    : Periodontal disease has been noted to increase C reative
    : proteins. Have you had your dental exam recently?

    Make that "dental cleaning and scaling"...
     
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