cabbage rolls

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Andy, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    What kind of cabbage should I be using to make cabbage rolls? My
    local store keeps white cabbages (small and dense) and savoy cabbages
    (big and leafy) - does the choice make any difference? I would've
    thought that the bigger leaves on the savoy cabbages would be easier
    to deal with, but I'd welcome suggestions either way..

    Many thanks,

    Andy
     
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  2. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 14:34:11 +0000, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What kind of cabbage should I be using to make cabbage rolls? My
    >local store keeps white cabbages (small and dense) and savoy cabbages
    >(big and leafy) - does the choice make any difference? I would've
    >thought that the bigger leaves on the savoy cabbages would be easier
    >to deal with, but I'd welcome suggestions either way..


    I've started using savoy cabbage since they wrap easier, hold more
    sauce, and taste the same as the regular cabbage. The crinkles in
    the savoy kinda form an 'elastic' wrapper.

    -sw
     
  3. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > What kind of cabbage should I be using to make cabbage rolls? My
    > local store keeps white cabbages (small and dense) and savoy cabbages
    > (big and leafy) - does the choice make any difference? I would've
    > thought that the bigger leaves on the savoy cabbages would be easier
    > to deal with, but I'd welcome suggestions either way..
    >
    > Many thanks,
    >
    > Andy


    http://www.foodsubs.com/Cabbage.html#napa

    I think you're referring to green cabbage when you say "white cabbage". It
    appears you can use the savoy in its place and I agree the leaves would
    probably be easier to deal with for cabbage rolls.

    Jill
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > What kind of cabbage should I be using to make cabbage rolls? My
    > local store keeps white cabbages (small and dense) and savoy cabbages
    > (big and leafy) - does the choice make any difference? I would've
    > thought that the bigger leaves on the savoy cabbages would be easier
    > to deal with, but I'd welcome suggestions either way..
    >
    > Many thanks,
    >
    > Andy


    My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly, then
    fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves which are now
    pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and repeat).
    Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result is worth it (so
    long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).

    Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.

    -P.


    --
    =========================================
    firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
     
  5. On Tue 13 Dec 2005 05:37:12a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Peter
    Huebner?

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > says...
    >> What kind of cabbage should I be using to make cabbage rolls? My
    >> local store keeps white cabbages (small and dense) and savoy cabbages
    >> (big and leafy) - does the choice make any difference? I would've
    >> thought that the bigger leaves on the savoy cabbages would be easier
    >> to deal with, but I'd welcome suggestions either way..
    >>
    >> Many thanks,
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    > What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly,
    > then fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves
    > which are now pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and
    > repeat). Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result is
    > worth it (so long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).
    >
    > Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.
    >
    > -P.


    Same here, and it is worth it. The shortcut methods like freezing the
    whole head of cabbage, then defrosting, makes for really horrible cabbage.
    Oh, yes, ordinary cabbage.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  6. On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 01:37:12 +1300, Peter Huebner
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    > What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly, then
    > fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves which are now
    > pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and repeat).
    > Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result is worth it (so
    > long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).
    >
    > Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.


    Tell her she could save time by peeling off all the leaves and doing
    The Process to all of them at once.

    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  7. George

    George Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 01:37:12 +1300, Peter Huebner
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    >>What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly, then
    >>fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves which are now
    >>pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and repeat).
    >>Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result is worth it (so
    >>long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).
    >>
    >>Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.

    >
    >
    > Tell her she could save time by peeling off all the leaves and doing
    > The Process to all of them at once.
    >
    > Carol


    Some cabbages aren't agreeable to that method... If the OPs cabbage is
    anything like what grows locally here you would have a bunch of torn
    leaves if you tried to remove them before cooking.
     
  8. On Wed 14 Dec 2005 06:31:22a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it George?

    > Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    >> On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 01:37:12 +1300, Peter Huebner
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    >>>What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly,
    >>>then fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves
    >>>which are now pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and
    >>>repeat). Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result
    >>>is worth it (so long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).
    >>>
    >>>Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.

    >>
    >>
    >> Tell her she could save time by peeling off all the leaves and doing
    >> The Process to all of them at once.
    >>
    >> Carol

    >
    > Some cabbages aren't agreeable to that method... If the OPs cabbage is
    > anything like what grows locally here you would have a bunch of torn
    > leaves if you tried to remove them before cooking.
    >


    Yes, the cabbages I can buy would never come apart like that without par-
    cooking to soften and loosen the leaves.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  9. On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 08:31:22 -0500, George <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > > On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 01:37:12 +1300, Peter Huebner
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    > >>What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly, then
    > >>fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves which are now
    > >>pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and repeat).
    > >>Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result is worth it (so
    > >>long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).
    > >>
    > >>Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.

    > >
    > >
    > > Tell her she could save time by peeling off all the leaves and doing
    > > The Process to all of them at once.
    > >
    > > Carol

    >
    > Some cabbages aren't agreeable to that method... If the OPs cabbage is
    > anything like what grows locally here you would have a bunch of torn
    > leaves if you tried to remove them before cooking.


    Gotcha. I apologize for providing faulty advice, Peter.

    Thanks, George.
    Carol
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
  10. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Peter Huebner <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    > What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly, then
    > fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves which
    > are now pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and repeat).
    > Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result is worth it (so
    > long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).
    >
    > Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.


    All that is unnecessary. Discard the tough outside leaves. Detach the
    rest of the cabbage leaves, wrap 'em in foil and put into hot oven for
    about 7 minutes. The leaves will be tastier, more elastic, and will
    retain all their juices.

    Victor
     
  11. In article <1h7jchm.1ca7x6kwu92b0N%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    > Peter Huebner <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > My wife is the most expert cabbage roll maker I've come across ;-)
    > > What she does is, she immerses the cabbage in boiling water briefly, then
    > > fishes it out and dips it in cold water. Removes the outer leaves which
    > > are now pliable. Back to the pot of boiling water .... (rinse and repeat).
    > > Very laborious process. I shudder, just watching. The result is worth it (so
    > > long as I don't have to do the 'it' part).
    > >
    > > Oh, and she uses the ordinary firm cabbages, not savoy.

    >
    > All that is unnecessary. Discard the tough outside leaves. Detach the
    > rest of the cabbage leaves, wrap 'em in foil and put into hot oven for
    > about 7 minutes. The leaves will be tastier, more elastic, and will
    > retain all their juices.
    >
    > Victor


    I've heard that freezing the cabbage head will render the leaves limp,
    too. I do the boiling water thing but don't put them in cold water
    after. And I trim the thick rib.
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-13-05 - RIP, Gerri
     
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