Cable guide under the bottom bracket

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Lincoln Dickers, May 23, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Is there a name for the cable guide under the bottom bracket?

    How often do these need replaced?

    It seems like a place that could cause a considerable amount of friction but no one ever seems to
    blame them when shifting gets goofy.

    I am doing an overhaul on my Bianchi Eros, about 6000 miles on it. I cleaned and inspected the cable
    guide. Nothing looks bad but I was not sure what I should be looking for.

    Thanks, Lincoln

    "The bicycle is a curious vehicle: Its passenger is its engine." -John Howard
     
    Tags:


  2. Eddiefel

    Eddiefel Guest

    Just clean it off if it gets gunky. Otherwise no maintenance needed. The original guide on my
    Ritchey Logic is still fine after 25K miles.

    I've learned they are not absolutely necessary, even. I bought a custom Dave Yates (English builder)
    and he uses a slotted bottom braket shell, the cables run right on the metal, you wouldn't know it
    without looking.

    Lincoln Dickerson wrote:

    > Is there a name for the cable guide under the bottom bracket?
    >
    > How often do these need replaced?
    >
    > It seems like a place that could cause a considerable amount of friction but no one ever seems to
    > blame them when shifting gets goofy.
    >
    > I am doing an overhaul on my Bianchi Eros, about 6000 miles on it. I cleaned and inspected the
    > cable guide. Nothing looks bad but I was not sure what I should be looking for.
    >
    > Thanks, Lincoln
    >
    > "The bicycle is a curious vehicle: Its passenger is its engine." -John Howard
     
  3. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    Yow. I've seen a tube get literally rubbed through on a Cannondale Gemini just by the housing
    rubbing it (granted, it was braided hydraulic housing). I know they're a lot more confined, and not
    rubbing so much as pulling past, but that'd still make me a little bit uneasy.

    Jon Bond

    "Eddiefel" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Just clean it off if it gets gunky. Otherwise no maintenance needed. The original guide on my
    > Ritchey Logic is still fine after 25K miles.
    >
    > I've learned they are not absolutely necessary, even. I bought a custom Dave Yates (English
    > builder) and he uses a slotted bottom braket shell, the cables run right on the metal, you
    > wouldn't know it without looking.
    >
    >
    >
    > Lincoln Dickerson wrote:
    >
    > > Is there a name for the cable guide under the bottom bracket?
    > >
    > > How often do these need replaced?
    > >
    > > It seems like a place that could cause a considerable amount of friction but no one ever seems
    > > to blame them when shifting gets goofy.
    > >
    > > I am doing an overhaul on my Bianchi Eros, about 6000 miles on it. I cleaned and inspected the
    > > cable guide. Nothing looks bad but I was not sure what I should be looking for.
    > >
    > > Thanks, Lincoln
    > >
    > > "The bicycle is a curious vehicle: Its passenger is its engine." -John Howard
    >
     
  4. Eddiefel

    Eddiefel Guest

    This is a steel bike, not sure what the wall thickness of the shell is, but I don't expect the
    cables to ever seriously cut the metal. After 4K miles the cables haven't gotten through the paint
    yet. I've come to learn that this style once was not uncommon for steel bikes. It is necessary in
    the case of my Yates as he uses a relieved shell (read, open hole facing the ground) for drainage.

    I would think a plastic guide would be easier to cut and I've yet to see a derailleur cable make
    much of a cut into one -- then again I'm only to the 25K or so on my oldest bike.

    Jon Bond wrote:

    > Yow. I've seen a tube get literally rubbed through on a Cannondale Gemini just by the housing
    > rubbing it (granted, it was braided hydraulic housing). I know they're a lot more confined, and
    > not rubbing so much as pulling past, but that'd still make me a little bit uneasy.
    >
    > Jon Bond
    >
    > "Eddiefel" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Just clean it off if it gets gunky. Otherwise no maintenance needed. The original guide on my
    >>Ritchey Logic is still fine after 25K miles.
    >>
    >>I've learned they are not absolutely necessary, even. I bought a custom Dave Yates (English
    >>builder) and he uses a slotted bottom braket shell, the cables run right on the metal, you
    >>wouldn't know it without looking.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>Lincoln Dickerson wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Is there a name for the cable guide under the bottom bracket?
    >>>
    >>>How often do these need replaced?
    >>>
    >>>It seems like a place that could cause a considerable amount of friction but no one ever seems to
    >>>blame them when shifting gets goofy.
    >>>
    >>>I am doing an overhaul on my Bianchi Eros, about 6000 miles on it. I cleaned and inspected the
    >>>cable guide. Nothing looks bad but I was not sure what I should be looking for.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks, Lincoln
    >>>
    >>>"The bicycle is a curious vehicle: Its passenger is its engine." -John Howard
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
     
  5. Lincoln Dickerson wrote:
    > I am doing an overhaul on my Bianchi Eros, about 6000 miles on it. I cleaned and inspected the
    > cable guide. Nothing looks bad but I was not sure what I should be looking for.

    Over time the cables will wear grooves in the guide. If the grooves get deep enough, the friction of
    the cables passing through the guide will increase. This takes a long time to happen, however, and I
    don't think you need to worry about this at only 6000 miles.

    --
    Jerry Gardner [email protected]
     
  6. I've always called it an "under the bottom bracket cable guide". Ain't confused a bike shop with
    that name yet.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  7. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Lincoln Dickerson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Is there a name for the cable guide under the bottom bracket?
    >
    > How often do these need replaced?
    >
    > It seems like a place that could cause a considerable amount of friction but no one ever seems to
    > blame them when shifting gets goofy.
    >
    > I am doing an overhaul on my Bianchi Eros, about 6000 miles on it. I cleaned and inspected the
    > cable guide. Nothing looks bad but I was not sure what I should be looking for.

    A drop of oil on the cable guide cures some shifting problems. That's all I've ever found
    necessary for them.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  8. Eddiefel <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > This is a steel bike, not sure what the wall thickness of the shell is, but I don't expect the
    > cables to ever seriously cut the metal. After 4K miles the cables haven't gotten through the paint
    > yet. I've come to learn that this style once was not uncommon for steel bikes. It is necessary in
    > the case of my Yates as he uses a relieved shell (read, open hole facing the ground) for drainage.

    I had a Norco steel touring bike (Tange Infinity) and the cables cut deeply into the bb shell.

    I tried the Teflon(tm) coated Slick(tm) cables, then the regular Slick(tm) cables. These are
    smoother and slightly smaller diameter than the regular (cheaper) cables, so perhaps the
    different diameter contributed to the rapid wear.

    The bike was stolen out of my car :-(, so I don't know if the rate-of-wear slowed down once a
    new, narrower groove had been worn into the bb shell.

    (the cables also tended to fray and break at the bb :-( )

    IMO Plastic guides, or even a section of plastic-lined cable housing, will save some grief.

    hth
     
  9. Frank121

    Frank121 Guest

    Hopefully as soon as the thief began riding the bike, the cables began working like laser beams and
    cut the bike in half on a steep descent ;-)

    >I had a Norco steel touring bike (Tange Infinity) and
    the cables cut deeply into the bb shell. The bike was stolen out of my car
    :-(, so I don't know if the rate-of-wear slowed down once a new, narrower
    groove had been worn into the bb shell.
     
  10. On Fri, 23 May 2003 16:45:53 +0000, Eddiefel wrote:

    > This is a steel bike, not sure what the wall thickness of the shell is, but I don't expect the
    > cables to ever seriously cut the metal. After 4K miles the cables haven't gotten through the paint
    > yet. I've come to learn that this style once was not uncommon for steel bikes. It is necessary in
    > the case of my Yates as he uses a relieved shell (read, open hole facing the ground) for drainage.
    >
    > I would think a plastic guide would be easier to cut and I've yet to see a derailleur cable make
    > much of a cut into one -- then again I'm only to the 25K or so on my oldest bike.

    My first road bike (Frejus) had brazed-on steel guides that routed the cables above the shell. They
    never wore out, but certainly the paint did, and it would be a source of both friction and rust.

    I have a plastic guide on my road bike now, which seems a good idea. Less friction, less fraying
    of the cables. I just got a 10-year-old Schwinn tandem frame, which just has little guide rings on
    the shells. I guess it would work OK, but again the paint will clearly wear away. It certainly
    would be a point where you would have to worry about cleaning and lubrication. A nylon guide would
    be less trouble.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored _`\(,_ | by little statesmen
    and philosophers and divines. --Ralph Waldo (_)/ (_) | Emerson
     
  11. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 23 May 2003 10:56:48 -0700, [email protected] (Lincoln Dickerson) wrote:

    >It seems like a place that could cause a considerable amount of friction but no one ever seems to
    >blame them when shifting gets goofy.

    I've had problems here when riding with an "energy drink" in my water bottles. Any spillage
    eventually finds its way to the cable guide where it can gum things up, especially in winter. When
    this first happened causing upshifts to become balky it took a while to identify. A flush from a
    water bottle (containing only water) cured the problem.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  12. Doug Kaye

    Doug Kaye Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I just got a 10-year-old Schwinn tandem frame, which just has little guide rings > on the shells.
    > I guess it would work OK, but again the paint will clearly wear away. It certainly would be a
    > point where you would have to worry about cleaning and lubrication. A nylon guide would be less
    > trouble.

    I have a Schwinn Paramount PDG with these little guide rings. The cables are starting to wear a
    groove in the BB shell. I also notice that I have to pull the cables, clean, lube, and replace about
    every 3 months, when the shifting gets balky. On my other bikes with nylon guides, shifting has
    never become bad enough to necessitate cleaning (though I clean every 6 months or so anyway). Maybe
    I should file the rings down and glue on a nylon guide..
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...