CABLE HOUSING: Brake for derailleur?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Default, Jul 16, 2003.

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  1. Default

    Default Guest

    This might sound like a stupid question, but if you have a knowledgeable answer I would
    appreciate it.

    Is there any fundamental difference between brake and derailleur cable housing?

    What would be the problem with using "brake" housing for derailleur cable?

    thanks............
     
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  2. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    default wrote:

    > This might sound like a stupid question, but if you have a knowledgeable answer I would
    > appreciate it.
    >
    > Is there any fundamental difference between brake and derailleur cable housing?

    Yes. Brake cable housing usually has a spiral wound metal core, whereas gear cabling is made using
    axial wires, held together by the outer plastic. There are other variations, but these are the
    basic ones.

    > What would be the problem with using "brake" housing for derailleur cable?

    It can work, but not as well. The gear cable housing changes length less when bent (e.g. when
    you turn the handlebars). If you don't want to risk changing gear when doing a very tight low
    speed turn, don't use brake outers for gears. Oh, and don't use gear outers for brakes - it's
    not as strong.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  3. Default

    Default Guest

    thnx jim -- thats exactly what i wanted to know.

    Jim Price wrote:
    > default wrote:
    >
    >> This might sound like a stupid question, but if you have a knowledgeable answer I would
    >> appreciate it.
    >>
    >> Is there any fundamental difference between brake and derailleur cable housing?
    >
    >
    > Yes. Brake cable housing usually has a spiral wound metal core, whereas gear cabling is made using
    > axial wires, held together by the outer plastic. There are other variations, but these are the
    > basic ones.
    >
    >> What would be the problem with using "brake" housing for derailleur cable?
    >
    >
    > It can work, but not as well. The gear cable housing changes length less when bent (e.g. when
    > you turn the handlebars). If you don't want to risk changing gear when doing a very tight low
    > speed turn, don't use brake outers for gears. Oh, and don't use gear outers for brakes - it's
    > not as strong.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >This might sound like a stupid question, but if you have a knowledgeable answer I would appreciate
    >it. Is there any fundamental difference between brake and derailleur cable housing?

    Yes, there is a difference. Once is spiral wound, and the other is edge wound.

    >What would be the problem with using "brake" housing for derailleur cable?

    Using brake casing for a derailleur cable is probably not going to be a big deal. Your shifting may
    suffer a bit, but it should be ok. Never use derailleur casing for your brakes. The casing cannot
    take compression and could fail when you need it most.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  5. Cbike

    Cbike Guest

    Actually the standard derailler housing sold is not adequate to handle the compression required for
    brakes however there is newer housing available which is designed for either use. Some types of
    JagWire housing is available which uses longitudinal wires (used in current derailler housings) with
    an external kevlar reinforced housing to give additional strength needed for brakes. This product
    used on brakes can decrease the compression of the housing therefore increase the amount of cable
    pull (very slightly). We've installed his on our tandem and see some improvement in brake lever
    capasity. Charlie Myer Indiana
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, default <[email protected]> wrote:
    >This might sound like a stupid question, but if you have a knowledgeable answer I would
    >appreciate it.
    >
    >Is there any fundamental difference between brake and derailleur cable housing?
    >
    >What would be the problem with using "brake" housing for derailleur cable?

    Rear derailleurs used with indexed shifting need a special kind of housing which does not compress
    as much. It works a lot better than brake cable housing. A small chunk of brake housing used from
    the chainstay to the derailleur won't cause a problem if the cable runs smoothly.

    If you use friction style shifting then brake housing will work OK.

    --Paul
     
  7. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    > Rear derailleurs used with indexed shifting need a special kind of housing which does not compress
    > as much. It works a lot better than brake cable housing. A small chunk of brake housing used from
    > the chainstay to the derailleur won't cause a problem if the cable runs smoothly.
    >
    > If you use friction style shifting then brake housing will work OK.
    >
    > --Paul

    I was doing this for years. Run SIS housing from the shifters to the frame, then SLR housing for the
    loop for the rear derailleur. Did this recently when I replaced cables and housing and just COULD
    NOT get the @#$ derailleur to shift. Grumble, grumble. Scratch head. Hmmm, maybe...

    Changed to SIS housing for the derailleur loop and everything worked like a swiss watch.

    Mike
     
  8. If it's INDEXED derailer housing, yes. The steel in an indexed derailer cable, instead of being
    wound into a tight coil (as in brake cables) is instead arranged in lengthwise strands for more
    accurate shifting.

    This makes the cable extremely resistant to compression (shortening) while shifting, but very weak
    as far as rupturing goes.

    _DO_NOT_USE_ indexed derailer cable housing for your brakes! This could result in the cable breaking
    out of the housing and leaving you with no brakes, at the worst possible time: When you're braking
    hard. I cannot stress this enough. It is is a Very Bad Thing!

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  9. Default

    Default Guest

    Sorry to beat this horse........ but the reason I asked originally was because I just bought a full
    set of Flak Jacket cables to redo my bike..... and looking at the housing, I could not see a
    difference between brake/shifter........

    natch, there was no difference. These were new sealed cables, but they are both the "lengthwise"
    housings.....

    So I put it on the brakes. No problems yet. :)

    So what is up with Avid. Did my package jsut get mislabeled at the factory?

    Chris Zacho The Wheelman wrote:
    > If it's INDEXED derailer housing, yes. The steel in an indexed derailer cable, instead of being
    > wound into a tight coil (as in brake cables) is instead arranged in lengthwise strands for more
    > accurate shifting.
    >
    > This makes the cable extremely resistant to compression (shortening) while shifting, but very weak
    > as far as rupturing goes.
    >
    > _DO_NOT_USE_ indexed derailer cable housing for your brakes! This could result in the cable
    > breaking out of the housing and leaving you with no brakes, at the worst possible time: When
    > you're braking hard. I cannot stress this enough. It is is a Very Bad Thing!
    >
    > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  10. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    default <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Sorry to beat this horse........ but the reason I asked originally was because I just bought a
    > full set of Flak Jacket cables to redo my bike..... and looking at the housing, I could not see a
    > difference between brake/shifter........
    >
    > natch, there was no difference. These were new sealed cables, but they are both the "lengthwise"
    > housings.....
    >
    > So I put it on the brakes. No problems yet. :)
    >
    > So what is up with Avid. Did my package jsut get mislabeled at the
    factory?

    Does the housing have a braided (stainless steel braid or somesuch) cover, between the outer plastic
    sheath, and the inner lengthwise strands? If so, it's likely this will stop the inner strands from
    splitting and popping through the outer sheath, and so the cables work for both brakes and gears.

    Shaun aRe
     
  11. Joe Yannie

    Joe Yannie Guest

    No, what Avidsays is that there is enough compression resistance in the housing ( since it is kevlar
    based ) that it can be used for brakes and shifters. I have used it for both with no problems.

    "default" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Sorry to beat this horse........ but the reason I asked originally was because I just bought a
    > full set of Flak Jacket cables to redo my bike..... and looking at the housing, I could not see a
    > difference between brake/shifter........
    >
    > natch, there was no difference. These were new sealed cables, but they are both the "lengthwise"
    > housings.....
    >
    > So I put it on the brakes. No problems yet. :)
    >
    > So what is up with Avid. Did my package jsut get mislabeled at the
    factory?
    >
    > Chris Zacho The Wheelman wrote:
    > > If it's INDEXED derailer housing, yes. The steel in an indexed derailer cable, instead of being
    > > wound into a tight coil (as in brake cables) is instead arranged in lengthwise strands for more
    > > accurate shifting.
    > >
    > > This makes the cable extremely resistant to compression (shortening) while shifting, but very
    > > weak as far as rupturing goes.
    > >
    > > _DO_NOT_USE_ indexed derailer cable housing for your brakes! This could result in the cable
    > > breaking out of the housing and leaving you with no brakes, at the worst possible time: When
    > > you're braking hard. I cannot stress this enough. It is is a Very Bad Thing!
    > >
    > > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    > >
    > > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
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