Cable inners rattling on top tube.



Hi all,

I'm sure I'm not the only one who likes a near-silent bike. My v-
braked RockHopper has an exposed brake cable inner routed along the
top tube. When brand-spanking-new from the EBC, there were three
rubber-y whotsits that prevented the cable slapping the top tube.
(Little friction-fit, donut-shaped 'washers'). These migrated slowly
towards the seatpost with time, and every few days, I would restore
them to the quarter points of the cable.

Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.

Suggestions from the wise appreciated,
Michael.
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

> Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
> length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
> slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
> to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
> few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.


Replace the exposed cable with a guided one, which you can secure to the
tube with cable ties. Or learn to live with it, or retrofit HS-33s...
or turn up your walkman ;-)

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
M

Mark McNeill

Guest
Response to :
> When brand-spanking-new from the EBC, there were three
> rubber-y whotsits that prevented the cable slapping the top tube.
> (Little friction-fit, donut-shaped 'washers'). These migrated slowly
> towards the seatpost with time, and every few days, I would restore
> them to the quarter points of the cable.
>
> Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
> length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
> slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
> to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
> few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.


What *I* would do would be to get some of those rubber bands that
posties keep dropping, and tie them tightly round the top tube under the
cable; they would dampen the noise of the cable, and might - if you're
lucky - stop the little rubber doughnuts from migrating.

They'd also make the bike look naff and undesirable to thieves, a fine
idea IMO.



--
Mark, UK
"You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all different."
 
M

M-gineering

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I'm sure I'm not the only one who likes a near-silent bike. My v-
> braked RockHopper has an exposed brake cable inner routed along the
> top tube. When brand-spanking-new from the EBC, there were three
> rubber-y whotsits that prevented the cable slapping the top tube.
> (Little friction-fit, donut-shaped 'washers'). These migrated slowly
> towards the seatpost with time, and every few days, I would restore
> them to the quarter points of the cable.
>
> Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
> length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
> slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
> to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
> few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.
>
> Suggestions from the wise appreciated,
> Michael.
>


increase the tension of the brakesprings (use another hole on the
brakepivots)
fix the donuts with a blob of siliconesealant

--
/Marten

info(apestaartje)m-gineering(punt)nl
 
On 30 Jul, 14:50, Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>
> <snip question>
>
> Replace the exposed cable with a guided one, which you can secure to the
> tube with cable ties. Or learn to live with it, or retrofit HS-33s...
> or turn up your walkman ;-)
>
> Pete.
> --


I suspect they always expected me to retrofit disc brakes; disc-
specific hubs and frame attachment points as standard.

I may look to route a continuous sheathed cable along the intended
disc cable route, which already has cable tie slots....

thanks,
m.
 
On 30 Jul, 14:56, Mark McNeill <[email protected]> wrote:
> Response to :
>
> > When brand-spanking-new from the EBC, there were three
> > rubber-y whotsits that prevented the cable slapping the top tube.
> > (Little friction-fit, donut-shaped 'washers'). These migrated slowly
> > towards the seatpost with time, and every few days, I would restore
> > them to the quarter points of the cable.

>
> > Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
> > length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
> > slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
> > to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
> > few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.

>
> What *I* would do would be to get some of those rubber bands that
> posties keep dropping, and tie them tightly round the top tube under the
> cable; they would dampen the noise of the cable, and might - if you're
> lucky - stop the little rubber doughnuts from migrating.
>
> They'd also make the bike look naff and undesirable to thieves, a fine
> idea IMO.
>
> --
> Mark, UK
> "You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all different."


I was hoping to avoid over-naffness. While detering theives is a Good
Thing, the bike has yet to be left locked unattended, and so its not a
huge issue. (v secure indoor parking at work). Wrapping the entire top
tube in ex-inner tube has also occured to me.

M.
 
On 30 Jul, 15:02, M-gineering <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > Hi all,

>
> < snip qiestion>
>
> > Suggestions from the wise appreciated,
> > Michael.

>
> increase the tension of the brakesprings (use another hole on the
> brakepivots)
> fix the donuts with a blob of siliconesealant
>
> --
> /Marten
>


M-gineering,

I'll try the silicon idea, assuming one of the approx 4 tubes I have
open hasn't fully cured.

Thanks,
M.
 
C

CoyoteBoy

Guest
On 30 Jul, 14:43, [email protected] wrote:
> Hi all,
> Suggestions from the wise appreciated,
> Michael.


Glue? Just stick the little buggers in place.
 
P

Paul Rudin

Guest
CoyoteBoy <[email protected]> writes:

> On 30 Jul, 14:43, [email protected] wrote:
>> Hi all,
>> Suggestions from the wise appreciated,
>> Michael.

>
> Glue? Just stick the little buggers in place.


The answer is always duct tape. Whatever the cycle repair question is
:)
 
P

Paul Boyd

Guest
On 30/07/2007 14:43, [email protected] said,

> Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
> length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
> slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
> to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
> few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.


I haven't tried it, but how about sticking Lizard Skin frame protection
patches under the cables? They're quite squidgy, so might stop the
rattle. The cheap option is those old-fashioned thick puncture repair
pads :)

> Suggestions from the wise appreciated,


Err.... oh!!!

--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
>
> Suggestions from the wise appreciated,
>


Superglue the donuts in place (but not too close to the cable stops or
the cable won't be able to move freely

Tony
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
> On Mon, 30 Jul 2007 16:49:47 +0100, Paul Rudin
> <[email protected]> said in <[email protected]>:
>
>> The answer is always duct tape.

>
> Funnely enough that was precisely what occurred to me.
>


Well it is like the The Force - it has a dark side and a light side and
it holds the Universe together.

IGMC

Tony
 
J

Jeff

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
<snip>


> Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
> length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
> slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
> to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
> few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.
>
> Suggestions from the wise appreciated,
> Michael.


I've got a supersize chainstay protector pad thingy wrapped around the
top tube on my trance to stop just such an annoyance (although i think
it's gear cables rattling on mine)

I used it purely as it was spare, at 7 quid or so it's possibly a tad
pricy for rattle prevention.

Jeff
 
P

Phil Cook

Guest
Paul Rudin wrote:

>CoyoteBoy <[email protected]> writes:


>> Glue? Just stick the little buggers in place.

>
>The answer is always duct tape. Whatever the cycle repair question is.


I have stuck reflectors on the pedals of my commuter/folder with it,
but isn't there a word too many in that last sentence >:)
--
Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In news:[email protected],
[email protected] <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to
tell us:
> Hi all,
>
> I'm sure I'm not the only one who likes a near-silent bike. My v-
> braked RockHopper has an exposed brake cable inner routed along the
> top tube. When brand-spanking-new from the EBC, there were three
> rubber-y whotsits that prevented the cable slapping the top tube.
> (Little friction-fit, donut-shaped 'washers'). These migrated slowly
> towards the seatpost with time, and every few days, I would restore
> them to the quarter points of the cable.
>
> Their training has paid off however, and they can now migate the
> length of the cable in a single commute. This results in the cable
> slapping the top tube and sounding something like someone attempting
> to play duelling banjo's on the spoons. (My commute takes in quite a
> few cobbled streets). It's driving me nuts.
>
> Suggestions from the wise appreciated,


I solved this problem on my Trek 4300 by fitting it with hydraulic disc
brakes, but I suspect that's not quite what you want to hear :)

--
Dave Larrington
<http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk>
Me, I wanna be an anglepoise lamp, yeah!
 
M

Mark

Guest
> I solved this problem on my Trek 4300 by fitting it with hydraulic
> disc brakes, but I suspect that's not quite what you want to hear :)


Yeah, "time for a new bike" is what he wanted :)
 
On 31 Jul, 09:49, Mark
<[email protected]*turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com.invalid>
wrote:
> > I solved this problem on my Trek 4300 by fitting it with hydraulic
> > disc brakes, but I suspect that's not quite what you want to hear :)

>
> Yeah, "time for a new bike" is what he wanted :)


Mark,

This *is* the new bike. Not even regulars here would justify another
new bike to prevent cable rattle, would they?

M.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> On 31 Jul, 09:49, Mark
> <[email protected]*turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com.invalid>
> wrote:
>>> I solved this problem on my Trek 4300 by fitting it with hydraulic
>>> disc brakes, but I suspect that's not quite what you want to hear :)

>> Yeah, "time for a new bike" is what he wanted :)

>
> Mark,
>
> This *is* the new bike. Not even regulars here would justify another
> new bike to prevent cable rattle, would they?
>


No, we don't need an excuse to justify a new bike ;-)

Tony