Cadence out of saddle

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by novetan, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. novetan

    novetan New Member

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    On the flat, the normal cadence would be anything between 85 to 105 (+/-) rpm.

    What’s your cadence when peddle out of saddle on the flat (say a reasonable sustainable distance)
     
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  2. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    There are not many good reasons to pedal out of the saddle for "a reasonable distance" on the flat. Getting out of the saddle is good for sprints or relieving seat pressure, but is not something typically done for miles at a time.

    That said, I generally shift up a gear or two before standing up - which would make my cadence 5-15 rpm lower than seated.
     
  3. novetan

    novetan New Member

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    tks
     
  4. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    +1 on maydog's reply above. If you're sprinting, jumping out of a corner or closing a gap quickly your gear choice and cadence should be dictated by the need for quick speed which often means a bit lower gear and higher cadence. But the other common reason to ride out of the saddle on flat roads is to stretch a bit, change up the muscle loading and perhaps give your butt a break. In that case as maydog points out it's usually best to shift up a cog or two to harder gears, stand up and rock the bike gently for a while to change things up a bit without losing speed or losing contact with a wheel you're following.

    -Dave
     
  5. Dave Cutter

    Dave Cutter Active Member

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    As we get into spring we will read of more new cyclists wondering why and for how long their butts will hurt. Often just standing long enough to move some blood into the large muscles [normally compressed when on the saddle] is enough to save butt discomfort on long rides.

    I try to remember to drink some water every 4 or 5 miles to remain hydrated. For me that is also a good time to think about whether on not I've been stuck on the saddle too long as well. Standing up... out of... off the saddle doesn't take a long time to feel like it does good. Often it's just a few seconds for me. I would say I am rarely out of the saddle for a minute... unless I am climbing.
     
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