Calcium deficit - should I try to 'make it up'?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Newsposter Guy, Dec 10, 2003.

  1. I've been analyzing my diet using Fitday recently (32yo male), and noticed that while most of my
    nutrients vary (some days more than the RDA, some days less), I almost always ran a calcium deficit
    because I didn't eat many calcium-rich foods (cheese, greens, etc.)

    I'm correcting that now so I meet my RDA each day, but I'm concerned about all the years where I
    consumed much less calcium every day than I am now. Should I be concerned? Is this something that I
    need to make up with extra calcium? Or will I be fine?

    Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. Mxsmanic

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Newsposter Guy writes:

    > I've been analyzing my diet using Fitday recently (32yo male), and noticed that while most of my
    > nutrients vary (some days more than the RDA, some days less), I almost always ran a calcium
    > deficit because I didn't eat many calcium-rich foods (cheese, greens, etc.)

    You can't be sure that you have a deficit of calcium from examining your diet alone. That requires
    things like blood tests.

    > I'm correcting that now so I meet my RDA each day, but I'm concerned about all the years where I
    > consumed much less calcium every day than I am now. Should I be concerned? Is this something that
    > I need to make up with extra calcium? Or will I be fine?

    I've read that long-term slight deficits in calcium are correlated with things like the incidence of
    osteoporosis, although that's not as much of a problem with men until very late in life. I don't
    think you can compensate by eating more calcium later in life, as it has to do with the laying down
    of bone over long periods.

    Dairy products can be a tasty way to take in a lot of calcium: not just milk, but ice cream, cheese,
    lots of dairy-based desserts, all sorts of stuff. That's how I get most of mine, but I've always
    been a milk drinker.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
     
  3. "Newsposter Guy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been analyzing my diet using Fitday recently (32yo male), and noticed that while most of my
    > nutrients vary (some days more than the RDA, some days less), I almost always ran a calcium
    > deficit because I didn't eat many calcium-rich foods (cheese, greens, etc.)
    >
    > I'm correcting that now so I meet my RDA each day, but I'm concerned about all the years where I
    > consumed much less calcium every day than I am now. Should I be concerned? Is this something that
    > I need to make up with extra calcium? Or will I be fine?
    >
    > Thanks.

    The calcium RDA is just a rule of thumb. Do you eat alot of meat and drink lots of carbonated drinks
    with phosphoric acid and empty calories? Or do you eat lower protein foods such as vegetables, and
    grains? Do you eat lots of salt? Higher protein diets will tend to up your requirement for calcium.
    Yet please recall that strong bones also require adequate protein. Empty calories displace good
    foods with at least some calcium. Higher salt intake mean higher calcium losses.

    On the bright side, it may help reduce your risk of prostate cancer a little in that being short
    of calcium will tend to cause the kidneys to activate more vitamin D to improve the uptake of
    calcium for the intestine. This is conditional on there being enough vitamin D to make this work.
    Otherwise, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is released to help rob calcium from the bone to maintain the
    all important serum Ca++ levels. Anyway, activated vitamin D has other functions that it serves
    and a little extra may help to reduce the chances of certain cancers. Low vitamin K levels and
    high PTH may result in the ectopic calcium deposits i.e. harding of the arteries and deposits in
    soft tissues.

    Yes, you should be concerned. Have ever had leg cramps? In an otherwise healthy person cramps can
    indicate at shortage of serum Ca++ and Mg++. I've observed men with overt signs of osteoporosis by
    the middle 50's. So you know it had been going on for awhile. Androgen hormones after age forty drop
    and keep dropping. Low androgens in males lead to 3 males in 20 having overt osteoporosis by the
    time of death. In women the rate far worse over half. Granted, androgens aren't the only factor.
    Vitamin D and K are directly important as is calcium.

    I hope that got you started.

    Be warned these are off the cuff comments!!!!

    a voice from the periphery ................ .............................William A. Noyes
     
  4. Mxsmanic

    Mxsmanic Guest

    William A. Noyes writes:

    > Granted, androgens aren't the only factor. Vitamin D and K are directly important as is calcium.

    So is exercise!

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
     
Loading...