Calculating energy requirements for long ride



D

DaveB

Guest
I came across this calculator to show energy requirements for various
activities.
http://health.ninemsn.com.au/tools/burnbarometer.aspx

Obviously this is pretty rough, but even so it showed my 2 1/2 hr ride
this morning burning around 7000J, but my breakfast before the ride, and
the muesli bar, powerade and coffee during the ride only providing about
3400J. Now I'm beginning to understand why I'm so flat at the end of a 3
hr ride.

Has anyone come across more precise calculator for energy burned? And
what are the views on how much you should try and take in before and
during the ride? If I'm burning 3000J an hour I can't imagine being able
to keep up with that. I want to get this sorted over winter because I'm
doing the bike leg of next Feb's half Ironman at Geelong, so I need to
be able to hold my speed in a 3 hour TT.

DaveB
 
In aus.bicycle on Sat, 21 Apr 2007 13:38:56 +1000
DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Has anyone come across more precise calculator for energy burned? And
> what are the views on how much you should try and take in before and
> during the ride? If I'm burning 3000J an hour I can't imagine being able
> to keep up with that. I want to get this sorted over winter because I'm
> doing the bike leg of next Feb's half Ironman at Geelong, so I need to
> be able to hold my speed in a 3 hour TT.


The AIS has some stuff on nutrition for various sports,

http://www.ais.org.au/nutrition/PPRecovery.asp
and
http://www.ais.org.au/nutrition/FuelFactSheets.asp

The cycling fact sheet says you need so many g of carbs per kg of
bodyweight

Elite Cyclist (600km/wk) Club Cyclist (300km/wk)
kilojoules > 250 kj/kg/day 150 - 200 kj/kg/day
carbohydrate 8 -11 g/kg/day 5 - 8 g/kg/day
protein 1.2 -1.6 g/kg/day 1-1.6 g/kg/day

Carbohydrate intake should be organised for rides over 1 hour in
duration and fluid needs will vary both with the distance and the
weather conditions. Be prepared and ensure you have access to sufficient
supplies. Carbohydrate intake needs to start before you hit a hunger
flat. Aim for about 30-60 g of carbohydrate per hour (see table).
Commence carbohydrate early in the race or training session to avoid
low stores in the latter stages of the ride.

50g Carbohydrate
800-1000 ml sports drink
2 carbohydrate gels
3 medium pieces fruit
2 cereal bars
800 ml cordial
500 ml juice
50 g jellybeans or jelly lollies
1 jam sandwich

Lots more useful stuff there.

Zebee
 
Zebee Johnstone wrote:
> flat. Aim for about 30-60 g of carbohydrate per hour (see table).
> Commence carbohydrate early in the race or training session to avoid
> low stores in the latter stages of the ride.
>
> 50g Carbohydrate
> 800-1000 ml sports drink
> 2 carbohydrate gels
> 3 medium pieces fruit
> 2 cereal bars
> 800 ml cordial
> 500 ml juice
> 50 g jellybeans or jelly lollies
> 1 jam sandwich
>


Thanks Zebee, that's a bit of an eye opener. What I've been using for a
3 hr ride amounts to about 56g of CHO. I think some jam sandwiches might
be in order.

DaveB
 
On 2007-04-21, Zebee Johnstone (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
> 50g Carbohydrate
> 800-1000 ml sports drink
> 2 carbohydrate gels
> 3 medium pieces fruit
> 2 cereal bars
> 800 ml cordial
> 500 ml juice
> 50 g jellybeans or jelly lollies
> 1 jam sandwich


or

h) all of the above

--
TimC
When some other esteemed editor reposts this, it'll be the Periodic
Periodic Table Table story, and I will be even happier. ;^)
-- Emil Brink on /., about the periodic table table.
 
On Apr 21, 1:38 pm, DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:
> I came across this calculator to show energy requirements for various
> activities.http://health.ninemsn.com.au/tools/burnbarometer.aspx
>
> Obviously this is pretty rough, but even so it showed my 2 1/2 hr ride
> this morning burning around 7000J, but my breakfast before the ride, and
> the muesli bar, powerade and coffee during the ride only providing about
> 3400J. Now I'm beginning to understand why I'm so flat at the end of a 3
> hr ride.
>


Roughly, the human body is around 20-25% efficient on a bicycle, which
is, conveniently, roughly the conversion between kilojoules and
kilocalories (generally known as kcal, or 'calories' on food lists).

Estimates of power produced on a bike are not accurate at all
(headwind? drafting? hills? tyres? your frontal area etc).

If you're only eating a tiny bit on a 3 hr ride (and we don't know how
hard you're doing the ride ...) you will be well down on muscle
glycogen and blood sugar.

One cheap thing (reasonably) to experiment with is to get a blood
sugar meter from a chemist (around $100 from memory), diabetics use
them, and use that before & after a ride to see if your blood sugar
level is roughly the same, if it's down, you need to eat more.

> Has anyone come across more precise calculator for energy burned?


A power meter linked to an O2 meter, but that's not cheap :) The human
body isn't a precise device. Watts generated is the 'best' practical
way to tell, not the random number that many (Polar ...) HRM's tell
you about kcal estimates. I've found comparing HRM estimates to watts/
energy to suggest that HRM data is -way- out.

> And
> what are the views on how much you should try and take in before and
> during the ride? If I'm burning 3000J an hour I can't imagine being able
> to keep up with that. I want to get this sorted over winter because I'm
> doing the bike leg of next Feb's half Ironman at Geelong, so I need to
> be able to hold my speed in a 3 hour TT.


carbo load (you've read the protocol, right?) and eat snakes and carbo
drinks. This stuff is covered in just about every text there is on
cycle racing. Get reading :)
 
DaveB said:
I came across this calculator to show energy requirements for various
activities.
http://health.ninemsn.com.au/tools/burnbarometer.aspx

Obviously this is pretty rough, but even so it showed my 2 1/2 hr ride
this morning burning around 7000J, but my breakfast before the ride, and
the muesli bar, powerade and coffee during the ride only providing about
3400J. Now I'm beginning to understand why I'm so flat at the end of a 3
hr ride.

Has anyone come across more precise calculator for energy burned? And
what are the views on how much you should try and take in before and
during the ride? If I'm burning 3000J an hour I can't imagine being able
to keep up with that. I want to get this sorted over winter because I'm
doing the bike leg of next Feb's half Ironman at Geelong, so I need to
be able to hold my speed in a 3 hour TT.

DaveB

One gram digestible carbohydrate per kilo body weight per hour of strenuous activity.
 
In article <[email protected]>,
DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:

> Zebee Johnstone wrote:
> > flat. Aim for about 30-60 g of carbohydrate per hour (see table).
> > Commence carbohydrate early in the race or training session to avoid
> > low stores in the latter stages of the ride.
> >
> > 50g Carbohydrate
> > 800-1000 ml sports drink
> > 2 carbohydrate gels
> > 3 medium pieces fruit
> > 2 cereal bars
> > 800 ml cordial
> > 500 ml juice
> > 50 g jellybeans or jelly lollies
> > 1 jam sandwich
> >

>
> Thanks Zebee, that's a bit of an eye opener. What I've been using for a
> 3 hr ride amounts to about 56g of CHO. I think some jam sandwiches might
> be in order.
>
> DaveB


Dave,

If you want to get serious about nutrition then there are volumes
written about the subject.

I have been waiting for the second edition of Monique Ryan's book
"Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes" to reach Australia and it just
has. It is available from Angus & Robertson bookshops ($A39.95) and
probably others as well. Do not even think about getting it posted from
Velozone as the cost is prohibitive. This link will give more info:
<http://www.velogear.com/prodinfo.asp?number=VP+SNEA2>

When considering what to eat you must also consider the glycaemic index
of the various types of food because that will dictate the rate at which
energy is produced from the food:
<http://www.healthinsite.gov.au/topics/Glycaemic_Index>

Not all foods are created equal.

cheers,
Darryl
 
Bleve wrote:

> One cheap thing (reasonably) to experiment with is to get a blood
> sugar meter from a chemist (around $100 from memory),


Around $40-$50 I believe now. The gotcha is the cost of test strips, $1+
each for my model if it isn't on prescription. Ask around if costis an
issue. someone may have an old model with a few test strips for free as
the pharm companies love offering the new models free (for the obvious
reason).
 
Darryl C said:
In article <[email protected]>,
DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:

> Zebee Johnstone wrote:
> > flat. Aim for about 30-60 g of carbohydrate per hour (see table).
> > Commence carbohydrate early in the race or training session to avoid
> > low stores in the latter stages of the ride.
> >
> > 50g Carbohydrate
> > 800-1000 ml sports drink
> > 2 carbohydrate gels
> > 3 medium pieces fruit
> > 2 cereal bars
> > 800 ml cordial
> > 500 ml juice
> > 50 g jellybeans or jelly lollies
> > 1 jam sandwich
> >

>
> Thanks Zebee, that's a bit of an eye opener. What I've been using for a
> 3 hr ride amounts to about 56g of CHO. I think some jam sandwiches might
> be in order.
>
> DaveB


Dave,

If you want to get serious about nutrition then there are volumes
written about the subject.

I have been waiting for the second edition of Monique Ryan's book
"Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes" to reach Australia and it just
has. It is available from Angus & Robertson bookshops ($A39.95) and
probably others as well. Do not even think about getting it posted from
Velozone as the cost is prohibitive. This link will give more info:
<http://www.velogear.com/prodinfo.asp?number=VP+SNEA2>

When considering what to eat you must also consider the glycaemic index
of the various types of food because that will dictate the rate at which
energy is produced from the food:
<http://www.healthinsite.gov.au/topics/Glycaemic_Index>

Not all foods are created equal.

cheers,
Darryl

Yes read all you can so you are fully informed but then allow common sense to make it simple.

GI doesn't matter once you are exercising (as long as it is not too low).

Don't eat high GI food immediately before you race.

Eat regular small amounts while you are racing.

If you have a low GI carbo top up (bananas, baked beans etc) about an hour or two before a race and you are well trained and the race is less than 2 hours forget eating during the race.

Save money by ignoring sports drinks and power bars. If you have to use prepared foods, eat gels and drink plenty of water.

Dried bananas are fantastic - about 80% digestible CHO and plenty of minerals.

The 1g per kg body weight per hour of racing is pretty accurate.

Enjoy your racing.
 
"mitosis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> DaveB Wrote:
>> I came across this calculator to show energy requirements for various
>> activities.
>> http://health.ninemsn.com.au/tools/burnbarometer.aspx
>>
>> Obviously this is pretty rough, but even so it showed my 2 1/2 hr ride
>> this morning burning around 7000J, but my breakfast before the ride,
>> and
>> the muesli bar, powerade and coffee during the ride only providing
>> about
>> 3400J. Now I'm beginning to understand why I'm so flat at the end of a
>> 3
>> hr ride.
>>
>> Has anyone come across more precise calculator for energy burned? And
>> what are the views on how much you should try and take in before and
>> during the ride? If I'm burning 3000J an hour I can't imagine being
>> able
>> to keep up with that. I want to get this sorted over winter because
>> I'm
>> doing the bike leg of next Feb's half Ironman at Geelong, so I need to
>> be able to hold my speed in a 3 hour TT.
>>
>> DaveB

>
> One gram digestible carbohydrate per kilo body weight per hour of
> strenuous activity.
>
>
> --
> mitosis
>


How much enery would be burned in this Gym class ?

< http://users.g-node.com.au/boostlinux/Gym_Workout.wmv >
 
On 2007-04-23, Boostland (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
> "mitosis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> One gram digestible carbohydrate per kilo body weight per hour of
>> strenuous activity.
>>

> How much enery would be burned in this Gym class ?
>
> < http://users.g-node.com.au/boostlinux/Gym_Workout.wmv >


Gee, I'm glad I didn't look at that at work.

--
TimC
Animals who are not penguins can only wish they were.