Calf Cramps



jmm279

New Member
Sep 9, 2007
6
0
0
Well, I just started training on my bike trainer for the winter. On rides going 2 hours or more, I have a tendency to develop severe calf cramps. I feel like I am drinking enough water/electrolytes. Maybe I am doing something wrong with my pedalling? Thanks for the advice.

Also, I'm a pretty big guy ( 6'3", ~197 lbs.), and everytime I get out of the saddle on the trainer, the real wheel likes to wiggle around a little bit on the trainer resistance wheel. Should I tighten down the clamp holding the rear skewer? How about tightening down the resistance wheel tighter on the wheel? Thanks again.
 

Alex Simmons

Active Member
Mar 12, 2006
2,471
40
38
jmm279 said:
Well, I just started training on my bike trainer for the winter. On rides going 2 hours or more, I have a tendency to develop severe calf cramps. I feel like I am drinking enough water/electrolytes. Maybe I am doing something wrong with my pedalling? Thanks for the advice.
Presuming you are used to riding such durations, then cramping in one area consistently suggests a positioning problem to me. If you do ride to failure (severe cramping) and if correctly positioned (and assuming no major functional disorders), then your legs should pretty much fatigue all over at the same rate.

I'd suggest a professional bike fit.
 

jmm279

New Member
Sep 9, 2007
6
0
0
I've had a professional bike fit done when I first purchased the bike, which was just earlier this year. Maybe I'm just not taking on enough fluids.
 

dhk2

Well-Known Member
Aug 8, 2006
2,214
74
48
75
jmm279 said:
I've had a professional bike fit done when I first purchased the bike, which was just earlier this year. Maybe I'm just not taking on enough fluids.
If you're doing 2 hour sessions on an indoor trainer, you must be dedicated. One hour should be plenty for trainer sessions, IMO. It could be that you're simply going too hard for this duration, without enough miles or months of training. You didn't mention cadence, but if you're pushing a big gear at low cadence, try riding in an easier gear that will allow you to spin at 90 rpm or more, or reducing the load setting a step if your trainer is adjustable.

One "fit" issue to look at would be your cleat position. If your cleat or foot position on the pedal is "forward", ie, the pedal spindle is in front of the ball of your foot, that will put added leverage on the calf muscles.

With patience, I'm sure you can get over this issue. Good luck.
 

wiredued

New Member
Aug 17, 2004
1,300
0
0
IMHO I would increase vitamin D intake in order to increase blood calcium levels to prevent calf cramps. Optimum vitamin D especially during fall and winter has many other benefits as well.
 

rparedes

New Member
Jul 21, 2007
527
0
0
jmm279 said:
Well, I just started training on my bike trainer for the winter. On rides going 2 hours or more, I have a tendency to develop severe calf cramps. I feel like I am drinking enough water/electrolytes. Maybe I am doing something wrong with my pedalling? Thanks for the advice.

Also, I'm a pretty big guy ( 6'3", ~197 lbs.), and everytime I get out of the saddle on the trainer, the real wheel likes to wiggle around a little bit on the trainer resistance wheel. Should I tighten down the clamp holding the rear skewer? How about tightening down the resistance wheel tighter on the wheel? Thanks again.

I used to cramp and somebody told me to increase my sodium intake. Now I drink fluids about (4 to 6 oz approx) every 10 to 15 minutes. The fluid is: water, salt, lemon juice and a little flavored powder (Krystal light). I don't cramp anymore... I also take a multi-vitamin supplement every day...
 

Kakashi

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2018
634
80
28
50
It's a sign of vitamin deficiency your nerves needs Vitamins E and B complex, I too suffered both leg and abdominal cramps and it was all gone after I took Polynerve E capsules. When we suffer cramps it means we have a problem with our nerves and drinking Vitamin B and E would easily solve cramps.