Calorie balance: eaten vs excreted



G

Gregory Toomey

Guest
I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
question that's pretty fundamental.

My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.

gtoomey
 
There is little to no credible info on anything having to do with
calories. It is a mirage.

TC

Gregory Toomey wrote:
> I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
> question that's pretty fundamental.
>
> My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
> Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
> sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
> I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>
> gtoomey
 
There is little to no credible info on anything having to do with
calories. It is a mirage.

TC

Gregory Toomey wrote:
> I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
> question that's pretty fundamental.
>
> My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
> Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
> sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
> I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>
> gtoomey
 
J

Joe the Aroma

Guest
"Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
> question that's pretty fundamental.
>
> My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
> Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
> sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
> I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>
> gtoomey


It depends on the calories. Excess carbohydrates are stored as fat as we all
know. Fiber, however, is not. Excess protein is excreted in urine. How much
that's excreted depends upon your metabolic needs.
 
J

Joe the Aroma

Guest
"Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
> question that's pretty fundamental.
>
> My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
> Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
> sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
> I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>
> gtoomey


It depends on the calories. Excess carbohydrates are stored as fat as we all
know. Fiber, however, is not. Excess protein is excreted in urine. How much
that's excreted depends upon your metabolic needs.
 
J

jbuch

Guest
Joe the Aroma wrote:
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
>>question that's pretty fundamental.
>>
>>My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
>>Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
>>sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
>>I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>>
>>gtoomey

>
>
> It depends on the calories. Excess carbohydrates are stored as fat as we all
> know. Fiber, however, is not. Excess protein is excreted in urine. How much
> that's excreted depends upon your metabolic needs.
>
>



Protein is the only macronutrient furnishing the body useful nitrogen in
significant proportions (proteins are complexes of amino acids).

Excess protein is converted into fat (with little or no nitrogen) and
the nitrogen (actually the whole amino group of the amino acids that
make up protein) is excreeted in the urine.

It is easy to see how that is sometimes stated as "Excess protein is
excreeted in the urine".

The Mayo Clinic Kidney guy says this:
------------------------------------------

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/high-protein-diets/AN00847

Your body can store only small amounts of excess protein. During
digestion and metabolism, protein is broken down into amino acids. These
are the building blocks of protein. Next, nitrogen is removed from these
extra amino acids. The nitrogen is processed by your liver and then
excreted in urine as waste.

--------------------------------------------

--
1) Eat Till SATISFIED, Not STUFFED... Atkins repeated 9 times in the book
2) Exercise: It's Non-Negotiable..... Chapter 22 title, Atkins book
3) Don't Diet Without Supplimental Nutrients... Chapter 23 title, Atkins
book
4) A sensible eating plan, and follow it. (Atkins, Self Made or Other)
 
J

jbuch

Guest
Joe the Aroma wrote:
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
>>question that's pretty fundamental.
>>
>>My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
>>Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
>>sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
>>I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>>
>>gtoomey

>
>
> It depends on the calories. Excess carbohydrates are stored as fat as we all
> know. Fiber, however, is not. Excess protein is excreted in urine. How much
> that's excreted depends upon your metabolic needs.
>
>



Protein is the only macronutrient furnishing the body useful nitrogen in
significant proportions (proteins are complexes of amino acids).

Excess protein is converted into fat (with little or no nitrogen) and
the nitrogen (actually the whole amino group of the amino acids that
make up protein) is excreeted in the urine.

It is easy to see how that is sometimes stated as "Excess protein is
excreeted in the urine".

The Mayo Clinic Kidney guy says this:
------------------------------------------

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/high-protein-diets/AN00847

Your body can store only small amounts of excess protein. During
digestion and metabolism, protein is broken down into amino acids. These
are the building blocks of protein. Next, nitrogen is removed from these
extra amino acids. The nitrogen is processed by your liver and then
excreted in urine as waste.

--------------------------------------------

--
1) Eat Till SATISFIED, Not STUFFED... Atkins repeated 9 times in the book
2) Exercise: It's Non-Negotiable..... Chapter 22 title, Atkins book
3) Don't Diet Without Supplimental Nutrients... Chapter 23 title, Atkins
book
4) A sensible eating plan, and follow it. (Atkins, Self Made or Other)
 
J

JC Der Koenig

Guest
Excess protein is stored as fat.

--
Most people are dumb as bricks; some people are dumber than that. -- MFW


"Joe the Aroma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
>> question that's pretty fundamental.
>>
>> My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
>> Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
>> sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
>> I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>>
>> gtoomey

>
> It depends on the calories. Excess carbohydrates are stored as fat as we
> all know. Fiber, however, is not. Excess protein is excreted in urine. How
> much that's excreted depends upon your metabolic needs.
>
>
 
J

JC Der Koenig

Guest
Excess protein is stored as fat.

--
Most people are dumb as bricks; some people are dumber than that. -- MFW


"Joe the Aroma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
>> question that's pretty fundamental.
>>
>> My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
>> Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
>> sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
>> I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>>
>> gtoomey

>
> It depends on the calories. Excess carbohydrates are stored as fat as we
> all know. Fiber, however, is not. Excess protein is excreted in urine. How
> much that's excreted depends upon your metabolic needs.
>
>
 
G

gweebles

Guest
I think what he means is how much does your body absorb. I don't have
the facts but I am also wondering that because it is known that the
body doesn't absorb every little nutrient that we eat.
 
J

jbuch

Guest
gweebles wrote:
> I think what he means is how much does your body absorb. I don't have
> the facts but I am also wondering that because it is known that the
> body doesn't absorb every little nutrient that we eat.
>



The original poster obviously was concerned with the efficiency of
digestion.... what percentage of macronutrient taken in by mouth exits
the anus incompletely extracted from the imput food form.

I am concerned with that too, as it is one of the means that allow
variations between people on their tendency to gain weight.

If, I convert 80% of my macronutrient input into useful body chemistry,
someone who converts 40% of their macronutrient input can eat a lot more
than me, do little exercise, and not gain weight..... while I may
struggle with easy weight gain problems.

Naturally, this has a lot to do with the whole problem of diet to
maintain or lose weight.

Joe the Aroma simply made a misstatement of how protein is digested.

--
1) Eat Till SATISFIED, Not STUFFED... Atkins repeated 9 times in the book
2) Exercise: It's Non-Negotiable..... Chapter 22 title, Atkins book
3) Don't Diet Without Supplimental Nutrients... Chapter 23 title, Atkins
book
4) A sensible eating plan, and follow it. (Atkins, Self Made or Other)
 
C

Cubit

Guest
I have read that humans are quite efficient at extracting calories from
food. While checking feces for calories makes sense in a laboratory study,
it is not necessary for dieting.

Fiday, which seems to be the dominant way to measure consumed calories on
AFDC is not likely to be quite right. However, it provides a good ballpark
number and most importantly a benchmark. If Fitday says you are consuming
1800 calories per day over a 2 month period and you neither gain nor lose
any weight for that 2 months, Then you know the Fitday benchmark for break
even. To lose weight, in that example, you need to "eat less" until Fitday
shows a lower average of calories per day. The difference in calories will
match up to 3500 calories per pound. Fitday is accurate on this difference
vs. weightloss in my experience.

http://www.fitday.com

I have no connection to Fitday, except as a download version customer.

Cubit

"Gregory Toomey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'm sure there must be plenty of info on this, this is an interesting
> question that's pretty fundamental.
>
> My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
> Say you are on 2000 calories per day, how many calories would the average
> sedentary person excrete (urine/faeces)? 50% (1000 calories)? 30%? 80%?
> I presume the remaining calories would be burned by the body.
>
> gtoomey
>
 
Am I the only one that is amazed how a well formulated and interesting
question can turn into all kinds of responses that do nothing to
address the issue at hand?

"My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
 
W

who

Guest
On 23 Nov 2005 07:50:22 -0800, "[email protected]"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Am I the only one that is amazed how a well formulated and interesting
>question can turn into all kinds of responses that do nothing to
>address the issue at hand?
>
>"My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"


Probably none. If you don't use what you take in it gets stored as
fat. I suppose some of what you excrete might have caloric value in
which case disregard my previous statement.
 
J

Joe the Aroma

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Am I the only one that is amazed how a well formulated and interesting
> question can turn into all kinds of responses that do nothing to
> address the issue at hand?
>
> "My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"


I said "it depends". My answer still stands.
 
S

Steve

Guest
On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:50:22 -0500, [email protected] wrote
(in article <[email protected]>):

> Am I the only one that is amazed how a well formulated and interesting
> question can turn into all kinds of responses that do nothing to
> address the issue at hand?
>
> "My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
>


I have never seen this seriously addressed. Another way of posing the
question might be:

- Since dung has been used for fuel since time immemorial, we know that it
burns.

- Calories are measured by burning food in a Bulb Calorimeter.

- It follows that at least part of the energy measured by the Bulb
Calorimeter must end up in dung and therefore not around your waist.

I would speculate that the pass-through is dependent on the individual's
metabolism and other factors that would be difficult to quantify. It does
seem like a rather large energy leak in the theory, however.

--
Steve
 
C

Cubit

Guest
My answer was saying that the percentage is low.

I just wish I had checked my spelling. How could I call ASDLC AFDC? My
reader does have a spelling checker, but every once in a while it just skips
that step and sends whatever I wrote. [Thank you Bill Gates]

<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Am I the only one that is amazed how a well formulated and interesting
> question can turn into all kinds of responses that do nothing to
> address the issue at hand?
>
> "My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
>
 
C

Cubit

Guest
I wonder if the burning dung is full of indigestible fiber?


"Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:50:22 -0500, [email protected] wrote
> (in article <[email protected]>):
>
> > Am I the only one that is amazed how a well formulated and interesting
> > question can turn into all kinds of responses that do nothing to
> > address the issue at hand?
> >
> > "My question is "What percentage of ingested calories are excreted?"
> >

>
> I have never seen this seriously addressed. Another way of posing the
> question might be:
>
> - Since dung has been used for fuel since time immemorial, we know that it
> burns.
>
> - Calories are measured by burning food in a Bulb Calorimeter.
>
> - It follows that at least part of the energy measured by the Bulb
> Calorimeter must end up in dung and therefore not around your waist.
>
> I would speculate that the pass-through is dependent on the individual's
> metabolism and other factors that would be difficult to quantify. It does
> seem like a rather large energy leak in the theory, however.
>
> --
> Steve
>
 
D

Doug Freyburger

Guest
Steve wrote:
>
> - Since dung has been used for fuel since time immemorial, we know that it
> burns.
>
> - Calories are measured by burning food in a Bulb Calorimeter.
>
> - It follows that at least part of the energy measured by the Bulb
> Calorimeter must end up in dung and therefore not around your waist.


The dung of ruminants is burned, not human ****. Human **** looks
and smells very different from cow/sheep/elephant/whatever ****.
Hmmm, yet another argument against eating grass.