CamelBack Clones

  • Thread starter HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)
  • Start date



H

HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)

Guest
Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
cyclepro or bell?
Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.

Thanks,
Brian
 
On May 28, 10:33 pm, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
<hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
> cyclepro or bell?
> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>
> Thanks,
> Brian


http://www.camelbak.com/index.cfm
 
"HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)" <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from
> like cyclepro or bell?
> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles?


Some of them carry 100 ounces of water. Some are insulated to keep water
cooler. The better ones are fairly comfortable on long rides.
 
HyperCube33 (Life2Death) wrote:
> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
> cyclepro or bell?
> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.


I've just acquired a Jack Wolfskin Morgana and the bag is well insulated
and seems ok for cycling. Not tried it in anger yet. 1 litre capacity,
about 2 US pints.
 
On May 28, 9:33 am, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
<hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
> cyclepro or bell?
> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.


I have a medium sized 70oz model that has decent capacity for other
junk I want to bring along. I generally don't like to ride with
backpacks, but Camelbaks are super comfy, and almost disappear in my
experience. They keep solar radiation off your back, and the water
stays cooler far longer than in a bottle. It's also easier to drink
more often in smaller sips, which I prefer to having to mess with a
bottle and cage.
 
sally <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
> Some of them carry 100 ounces of water. Some are insulated to keep water
> cooler. The better ones are fairly comfortable on long rides.


P.S. The models with an insulated drinking tube keep your water noticably
cooler than the type with an open drinking tube.
 
On May 28, 7:33 am, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
<hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
> cyclepro or bell?
> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>
> Thanks,
> Brian


I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.

I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
high 80s-mid 90s every day).
 
Hank Wirtz wrote:
> On May 28, 7:33 am, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
>> cyclepro or bell?
>> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
>> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
>> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
>> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Brian

>
> I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
> pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
> am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
> waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.
>
> I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
> summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
> want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
> high 80s-mid 90s every day).
>



There are a few situation were I prefer a Camelbak, but for 95% of the
time there is no need to carry 2 liters of water on your back.
Waterbottles are a great invention. I see people carry a Camelbak
stuffed with so much gear, ready to climb the Mount Everest just for a 2
hours ride....

Lou
--
Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)
 
"Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Hank Wirtz wrote:
>> On May 28, 7:33 am, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
>> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from
>>> like
>>> cyclepro or bell?
>>> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep
>>> it
>>> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only
>>> like
>>> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical
>>> to
>>> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Brian

>>
>> I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
>> pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
>> am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
>> waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.
>>
>> I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
>> summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
>> want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
>> high 80s-mid 90s every day).
>>

>
>
> There are a few situation were I prefer a Camelbak, but for 95% of the
> time there is no need to carry 2 liters of water on your back.
> Waterbottles are a great invention. I see people carry a Camelbak stuffed
> with so much gear, ready to climb the Mount Everest just for a 2 hours
> ride....
>
> Lou
> --
> Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)

So the moral here is to stuff more water bottles on my bike somehow? I saw
someone who had somehow put two bottles on the downtube and one on the seat
tube, perhaps someday I'll learn how to braze (?) stuff on...
 
HyperCube33 (Life2Death) wrote:
> "Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> Hank Wirtz wrote:
>>> On May 28, 7:33 am, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
>>> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from
>>>> like
>>>> cyclepro or bell?
>>>> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep
>>>> it
>>>> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only
>>>> like
>>>> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical
>>>> to
>>>> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> Brian
>>> I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
>>> pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
>>> am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
>>> waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.
>>>
>>> I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
>>> summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
>>> want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
>>> high 80s-mid 90s every day).
>>>

>>
>> There are a few situation were I prefer a Camelbak, but for 95% of the
>> time there is no need to carry 2 liters of water on your back.
>> Waterbottles are a great invention. I see people carry a Camelbak stuffed
>> with so much gear, ready to climb the Mount Everest just for a 2 hours
>> ride....
>>
>> Lou
>> --
>> Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)

> So the moral here is to stuff more water bottles on my bike somehow? I saw
> someone who had somehow put two bottles on the downtube and one on the seat
> tube, perhaps someday I'll learn how to braze (?) stuff on...
>
>



Wait a minute. On your 70 mile trail you can refill you waterbottles 3
times? That's 8 waterbottles. You need more?

Lou
--
Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)
 
>>> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"wrote:
>>>> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from
>>>> like
>>>> cyclepro or bell?
>>>> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep
>>>> it
>>>> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only
>>>> like
>>>> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical
>>>> to
>>>> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.


>> Hank Wirtz wrote:
>>> I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
>>> pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
>>> am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
>>> waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.
>>>
>>> I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
>>> summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
>>> want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
>>> high 80s-mid 90s every day).


> "Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote
>> There are a few situation were I prefer a Camelbak, but for 95% of the
>> time there is no need to carry 2 liters of water on your back.
>> Waterbottles are a great invention. I see people carry a Camelbak stuffed
>> with so much gear, ready to climb the Mount Everest just for a 2 hours
>> ride....


HyperCube33 (Life2Death) wrote:
> So the moral here is to stuff more water bottles on my bike somehow? I saw
> someone who had somehow put two bottles on the downtube and one on the seat
> tube, perhaps someday I'll learn how to braze (?) stuff on...


Easier with a 68cm frame:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/wfd_kw2.jpg

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
"Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> HyperCube33 (Life2Death) wrote:
>> "Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]...
>>> Hank Wirtz wrote:
>>>> On May 28, 7:33 am, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
>>>> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>>> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from
>>>>> like
>>>>> cyclepro or bell?
>>>>> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep
>>>>> it
>>>>> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles
>>>>> (only like
>>>>> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical
>>>>> to
>>>>> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>> Brian
>>>> I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
>>>> pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
>>>> am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
>>>> waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.
>>>>
>>>> I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
>>>> summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
>>>> want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
>>>> high 80s-mid 90s every day).
>>>>
>>>
>>> There are a few situation were I prefer a Camelbak, but for 95% of the
>>> time there is no need to carry 2 liters of water on your back.
>>> Waterbottles are a great invention. I see people carry a Camelbak
>>> stuffed with so much gear, ready to climb the Mount Everest just for a 2
>>> hours ride....
>>>
>>> Lou
>>> --
>>> Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)

>> So the moral here is to stuff more water bottles on my bike somehow? I
>> saw someone who had somehow put two bottles on the downtube and one on
>> the seat tube, perhaps someday I'll learn how to braze (?) stuff on...

>
>
> Wait a minute. On your 70 mile trail you can refill you waterbottles 3
> times? That's 8 waterbottles. You need more?
>
> Lou
> --
> Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)


No but most of the fill stations are within 10 miles of the trail, and then
it just stops for 15. Right now we only have 2 water bottles between us, so
I'm wondering if I should get two more or go with something more "modern."
=P
 
On May 28, 2:36 pm, A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:
> >>> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"wrote:
> >>>> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from
> >>>> like
> >>>> cyclepro or bell?
> >>>> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep
> >>>> it
> >>>> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only
> >>>> like
> >>>> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical
> >>>> to
> >>>> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
> >> Hank Wirtz wrote:
> >>> I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
> >>> pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
> >>> am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
> >>> waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.

>
> >>> I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
> >>> summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
> >>> want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
> >>> high 80s-mid 90s every day).

> > "Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote
> >> There are a few situation were I prefer a Camelbak, but for 95% of the
> >> time there is no need to carry 2 liters of water on your back.
> >> Waterbottles are a great invention. I see people carry a Camelbak stuffed
> >> with so much gear, ready to climb the Mount Everest just for a 2 hours
> >> ride....

> HyperCube33 (Life2Death) wrote:
> > So the moral here is to stuff more water bottles on my bike somehow? I saw
> > someone who had somehow put two bottles on the downtube and one on the seat
> > tube, perhaps someday I'll learn how to braze (?) stuff on...

>
> Easier with a 68cm frame:http://www.yellowjersey.org/wfd_kw2.jpg
>
> --
> Andrew Muziwww.yellowjersey.org
> Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Where the heck did you find a Silca Impero that long?
 
On Mon, 28 May 2007 09:33:05 -0500, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
<hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
>cyclepro or bell?
>Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
>cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
>3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
>carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.


I picked up a Novarra clone from REI a few years back on clearance; it
cost less than a new nalgene bladder. Holds 70 oz, and if I fill it
first with ice cubes, then with water, it'll keep the water in the
bladder cool for 4-5 hours. (Of course, the water in the lines gets
tepid before that!) Check the descriptions carefully, and make sure
there's insulation on both sides of the bladder -- I think some of the
Camelback's have one-sided insulation, too.

Pat

Email address works as is.
 
On May 28, 9:23 pm, Patrick Lamb <[email protected]> wrote:
> I think some of the
> Camelback's have one-sided insulation, too.



Mine only has insulation against the back, but being the "Cloudwalker"
model, the main storage compartment offers some dead air space. Iced
water stays cool as long as I need to ride.

I do need a new bladder as my last one was great for two years with
weekly cleaning, then I forgot it for three weeks during some
downtime, and it got smelly and the hose got packed with "fur".
Yummmo!
 
"HyperCube33 (Life2Death)" <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:D[email protected]...
>
> "Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>>><><><>>>><
>>
>> Wait a minute. On your 70 mile trail you can refill you waterbottles 3
>> times? That's 8 waterbottles. You need more?
>>
>> Lou
>> --
>> Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)

>
> No but most of the fill stations are within 10 miles of the trail, and
> then it just stops for 15. Right now we only have 2 water bottles between
> us, so I'm wondering if I should get two more or go with something more
> "modern." =P
>


I'd use the camelbak.
Mine is the MULE, 100 oz capacity, holds tools,
a road-morph pump, spare stuff, clothes and food.
Put in ice cubes and the water stays nice and cool.
Straps and a bungee setup allow you to make it as
compact as the load allows.


On a seventy mile trail I'd have a spare tire folded up in it,
a couple of spare tubes, tools, duct tape, a jacket, bandaids,
neosporin, bandanas my pump and food. Maybe a camera.
Tissues and handwipes. But that's me.
Invariably only the water is used but that's
generally most of the weight.

I don't know what kind of trail it is but I always find bottles on
mtn bike trails that have bounced out of the holder.

JP
 
In article <[email protected]>, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
<hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> says...

> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
> cyclepro or bell?
> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>
> Thanks,
> Brian


I'm going through a Camelbak phase again after a year or so of bottles
only. Both have their advantages. Camelbaks carry a lot more water.
Even the small ones hold as much as three bottles. OTOH, I don't find
they are so comfortable they disappear as others have claimed. It may
be true that they hide your back from the sun to some extent, but they
also prevent a lot of sweat and heat from radiating off your back.

I have found the Camelbak bladders to be surprisingly tough and non-
leaky, but my guess would be that the clones don't hold up as well. The
bane of Camelbak bladders is their high maintenance. You can't just
forget about them after a ride. They need to be carefully rinsed out
and preferably dried, or they will start to grow mould and mildew in a
hurry. A neglected Camelbak bladder can quickly become something you
wouldn't want to drink from again.

As for bottles, you could probably arrange to mount as many as you would
want if you buy double cages and seat mounted cages. Some bikes are
better than others for finding space on the frame to mount stuff. My
swoopy carbon fiber frame suks in that department.
 
On May 29, 8:53 pm, Barnard Frederick <[email protected]> wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> says...
>
> > Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from like
> > cyclepro or bell?
> > Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep it
> > cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles (only like
> > 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical to
> > carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.

>
> > Thanks,
> > Brian

>
> I'm going through a Camelbak phase again after a year or so of bottles
> only. Both have their advantages. Camelbaks carry a lot more water.
> Even the small ones hold as much as three bottles. OTOH, I don't find
> they are so comfortable they disappear as others have claimed. It may
> be true that they hide your back from the sun to some extent, but they
> also prevent a lot of sweat and heat from radiating off your back.
>
> I have found the Camelbak bladders to be surprisingly tough and non-
> leaky, but my guess would be that the clones don't hold up as well. The
> bane of Camelbak bladders is their high maintenance. You can't just
> forget about them after a ride. They need to be carefully rinsed out
> and preferably dried, or they will start to grow mould and mildew in a
> hurry. A neglected Camelbak bladder can quickly become something you
> wouldn't want to drink from again.


After rinsing and draining, try putting the bladder in a ziploc bag
and then in the freezer between uses. Bingo, no mildew, etc., etc.


>
> As for bottles, you could probably arrange to mount as many as you would
> want if you buy double cages and seat mounted cages. Some bikes are
> better than others for finding space on the frame to mount stuff. My
> swoopy carbon fiber frame suks in that department.
 
On 2007-05-28, A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:

> Easier with a 68cm frame:
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/wfd_kw2.jpg


As a thirsty guy who rides a 56cm frame, my first reaction was to
exclaim that the frame builder squandered at least two, and probably
three, bottle cage locations. If the pump could be mounted under the top
tube, a determined rider armed with the right hardware could probably
get seven or eight bottles onto that bike.

Dragging this back to the OP's question, the nice thing about Camelbak
bladders is that they're very easy to fill to capacity. I've recently
switched to a Jansport pack with a 3L Nalgene bladder, and I find it
inferior. Due to its shape he bladder needs to be supported at an angle
while filling to get anywhere near capacity, and the handle is not
strong enough to hold the weight of all that water. I can approach 3L
filling it in a deep sink or tub if I'm careful, but I'd be hard-pressed
to get more than 2L into it under other conditions. By comparison, the
1.5L Camelbak that it replaced can be easily filled to 2.1L.

I don't complain though, because my new pack has enough room to hold at
least six bottles in addition to the water stored in the bladder. That
might not be quite enough for Iron Bill, but it's more weight than I
ever want on my back.
 
HyperCube33 (Life2Death) wrote:
> "Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> HyperCube33 (Life2Death) wrote:
>>> "Lou Holtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>> news:[email protected]...
>>>> Hank Wirtz wrote:
>>>>> On May 28, 7:33 am, "HyperCube33 \(Life2Death\)"
>>>>> <hypercube[11x3]@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>> Has anyone used a camelback water backpack or any of the clones from
>>>>>> like
>>>>>> cyclepro or bell?
>>>>>> Do they hold more water than 24oz water bottles? How well do they keep
>>>>>> it
>>>>>> cool? The local trail has sparse water through its whole 70 miles
>>>>>> (only like
>>>>>> 3 stops - arugh) so I'm looking for alternatives as its only practical
>>>>>> to
>>>>>> carry a maximum of 2 bottles on our bikes.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>>> Brian
>>>>> I've been using them for years in bike commuting. I have one with a
>>>>> pack big enough to carry a change of clothes and some rain gear, and
>>>>> am ready for pretty much anything. I have to remind myself to bring a
>>>>> waterbottle when I ride without the Camelbak.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring it on my tour this
>>>>> summer. Carrying that much water will be great, but I don't know if I
>>>>> want my back covered when it's that hot (mid-July, probably in the
>>>>> high 80s-mid 90s every day).
>>>>>
>>>> There are a few situation were I prefer a Camelbak, but for 95% of the
>>>> time there is no need to carry 2 liters of water on your back.
>>>> Waterbottles are a great invention. I see people carry a Camelbak
>>>> stuffed with so much gear, ready to climb the Mount Everest just for a 2
>>>> hours ride....
>>>>
>>>> Lou
>>>> --
>>>> Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)
>>> So the moral here is to stuff more water bottles on my bike somehow? I
>>> saw someone who had somehow put two bottles on the downtube and one on
>>> the seat tube, perhaps someday I'll learn how to braze (?) stuff on...

>>
>> Wait a minute. On your 70 mile trail you can refill you waterbottles 3
>> times? That's 8 waterbottles. You need more?
>>
>> Lou
>> --
>> Posted by news://news.nb.nu (http://www.nb.nu)

>
> No but most of the fill stations are within 10 miles of the trail, and then
> it just stops for 15. Right now we only have 2 water bottles between us, so
> I'm wondering if I should get two more or go with something more "modern."
> =P
>
>


I think it's much more comfortable to carry water on the bike than on
your back. When I'm doing long rides I also usually want to have some
storage for clothes and a few supplies. I think the best answer is some
kind of rear bag. I have a "trunk" bag that velcros onto a rear rack. I
use it with either a (semi)-permanently mounted rear rack or a seatpost
mounted QR rack.

My favorite bottles by far are the Polar insulated ones. I don't find
them to have a plastic-y taste and they keep liquids cold fairly well in
the summer and from freezing in the winter.

I have 3 bottle cages on my main touring bike, 2 inside the triangle,
one outside. It's easy to bungee a couple of more to the rack/bag.

I like the flexibility of bottles. I often buy different liquids when I
find a store, so I can vary what I drink. Typically, I'll buy a large
container of something out of the cooler, drink half & fill a bottle(s)
with the remainder, and the insulated bottles will keep it palatable for
a while.

I have several Camelbaks and clones. I don't use any of them anymore. I
originally bought them for mountain biking, started using them for long
road rides too, but haven't used them for either in years.