Camelbaks

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by gsenior, Apr 23, 2003.

  1. gsenior

    gsenior Guest

    As I've noticed only the occasional reference to hydration systems in this newsgroup, I need to ask
    if anyone uses these things, for running as well as cycling. For running in particular, are they
    comfortable? Do they move or throw you off balance? Which one(s) would you recommend (and not
    recommend)?

    TIA.

    ____________________________________________________________________
    Greg (whose had enough of his out-of-control hip-slung water bottle)
     
    Tags:


  2. Islandtime

    Islandtime Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > As I've noticed only the occasional reference to hydration systems in this newsgroup, I need to
    > ask if anyone uses these things, for running as well as cycling. For running in particular, are
    > they comfortable? Do they move or throw you off balance? Which one(s) would you recommend (and not
    > recommend)?
    >
    > TIA.
    >
    > ____________________________________________________________________
    > Greg (whose had enough of his out-of-control hip-slung water bottle)

    ............................................................................. I have both the
    regular aero back type and the waist "camelbacks". I havent used the large one for running and vice
    versa. The ones especially made for road biking are good for that and the running ones work good in
    their area. I like a sleeve on my tube to keep the water cooler and a large bite valve. It gets
    extremely hot here and a long training run, even early am or late evening, requires a little
    planning for hydration along the way

    If you are just going to use water in them and want it cool. Freeze it about 1/2 full or so (laying
    the bladder flat) before riding, then take it out when you are ready to to and fill the rest of the
    way with water.. Usually works better than adding ice cubes.

    As far as brands I really don't think there is much difference in them except for accessories and
    the way the pouches hold the rest of your crap. I would recommend a chest or waist strap on the road
    one if you go with it.

    islandtme
     
  3. chris.hall

    chris.hall New Member

    Joined:
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    I have a basic camelback that I have used in training runs and on adventure races, in the running and biking stages. To be honest, it really didn't make any difference to balance or anything like that, and on the bike, you hardly know it is there. Thumbs up from me...
     
  4. Dave

    Dave Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 22:14:26 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] wrote:

    >As I've noticed only the occasional reference to hydration systems in this newsgroup, I need to ask
    >if anyone uses these things, for running as well as cycling. For running in particular, are they
    >comfortable? Do they move or throw you off balance? Which one(s) would you recommend (and not
    >recommend)?
    >
    >TIA.
    >
    >____________________________________________________________________
    >Greg (whose had enough of his out-of-control hip-slung water bottle)

    http://www.fuelbelt.com/

    This is the way to go when running, kind of weird for cycling. Bottles on the bike may be best.
     
  5. Paul Allen

    Paul Allen Guest

    On Fri, 25 Apr 2003 00:40:46 -0500, dave <[email protected]> wrote:

    >http://www.fuelbelt.com/ This is the way to go when running, kind of weird for cycling. Bottles on
    >the bike may be best.

    Why?

    This looks like a "batman-utility-belt"...!

    A camelbak or similar is much nicer looking, more useful, and perhaps offers a little back
    protection in a crash?
     
  6. Paul Allen

    Paul Allen Guest

    On 29 Apr 2003 06:02:57 GMT, [email protected] (Spm073) wrote:

    >Its also a good place to keep Gu and my keys. Patrick

    GU?
     
  7. Edward Dike

    Edward Dike Guest

  8. Paul Allen

    Paul Allen Guest

  9. Stay away from the camel's back, it's like having a huge tumor on your back. Do you want to walk
    around like Quasimoto? Go for water bottles and bum packs.

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > As I've noticed only the occasional reference to hydration systems in this newsgroup, I need to
    > ask if anyone uses these things, for running as well as cycling. For running in particular, are
    > they comfortable? Do they move or throw you off balance? Which one(s) would you recommend (and not
    > recommend)?
    >
    > TIA.
    >
    > ____________________________________________________________________
    > Greg (whose had enough of his out-of-control hip-slung water bottle)
     
  10. Paul Allen

    Paul Allen Guest

    On 29 Apr 2003 19:21:41 -0700, [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote:

    >Stay away from the camel's back, it's like having a huge tumor on your back. Do you want to walk
    >around like Quasimoto? Go for water bottles and bum packs.

    WTF?

    Camelbaks are excellent!

    Don't even know it's there....
     
  11. chris.hall

    chris.hall New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4
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    0
    Agreed - camelbaks are excellent. Belts and fiddling with little bottles is a pain in the ass, and requires too much thought, as opposed to putting the tube in your mouth and sucking...
     
  12. You obviously don't ride, silly boy. How many roadies do you see with big lumps on their backs? Go
    ride with the kiddies.

    Paul Allen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 29 Apr 2003 19:21:41 -0700, [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote:
    >
    > >Stay away from the camel's back, it's like having a huge tumor on your back. Do you want to walk
    > >around like Quasimoto? Go for water bottles and bum packs.
    >
    >
    > WTF?
    >
    > Camelbaks are excellent!
    >
    > Don't even know it's there....
     
  13. Paul Allen

    Paul Allen Guest

    On 30 Apr 2003 11:42:33 -0700, [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote:

    >You obviously don't ride, silly boy. How many roadies do you see with big lumps on their backs? Go
    >ride with the kiddies.

    I don't try to imitate other people, least of all roadies... no need to be so defensive, theres a
    good chap. (Try to see what it's like to debate your side like an adult. Give it a go. Go on. You
    know you want to.)

    I like my Camelbak, your opinion about feeling like quasimodo makes no sense to me, since I barely
    feel the thing when it's on my back.

    But you're allowed your opinion, even if it is wrong.
     
  14. How can a big bag of water not be felt? I did a century ride with one of those blasted bags and it
    felt like a sack of potatoes. When the sun come up, it heated up and stuck to my back. Piece of
    crap, I tell you. Piece of crap. Only use for it is backpacking and mountain biking. No road man (or
    girl) would be caught dead with one. That's my story and I'm sticking to it and not the bag.

    Paul Allen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 30 Apr 2003 11:42:33 -0700, [email protected] (Dr. Steven Walker) wrote:
    >
    > >You obviously don't ride, silly boy. How many roadies do you see with big lumps on their backs?
    > >Go ride with the kiddies.
    >
    >
    > I don't try to imitate other people, least of all roadies... no need to be so defensive, theres a
    > good chap. (Try to see what it's like to debate your side like an adult. Give it a go. Go on. You
    > know you want to.)
    >
    > I like my Camelbak, your opinion about feeling like quasimodo makes no sense to me, since I barely
    > feel the thing when it's on my back.
    >
    > But you're allowed your opinion, even if it is wrong.
     
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