Camelpack or water bottles?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by JTEK, Sep 1, 2004.

  1. rule62

    rule62 New Member

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  2. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    Bottles. Why put all that weight on my back? Even for 60 mile rides two large bottles are generally enough.
     
  3. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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    Always bidons. Camelbak is too uncomfortable for hours on the road.
     
  4. Gilders

    Gilders New Member

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    Exactly the same as Trekker.

    Don't like wearing the Camelbak as makes back really sweaty and uncomfortable, but extremely useful / indispensible bit of kit on longer rides.
     
  5. MERTON

    MERTON New Member

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    isn't there an aero camelbak? i would get that. i can't find it on their site... given their crappy questioning system. why can't they sjust show all the products? dumbasses. i hate those survey style systems.
     
  6. GreenGoblin

    GreenGoblin New Member

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    CamelBak MULE all the time. Bottles as well on long rides. Fluids stay the same temp in the CamelBak (cool in summer, warm in winter except for what's in the tube which gets hot in summer and cold in winter and I always find that amusing...) and personally I've never had a problem with comfort. I carry tools, air pump, snacks, keys, layers in the MULE and only keep the tubes in the seatbag. I have everything I need for the ride when I switch bikes (road, mountain, tandem).

    I've never been graded by the fashion police, but I've always assumed I have a perfect form following function.
     
  7. MooBob42

    MooBob42 New Member

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    I take a 70 oz CamelBak Classic filled with mostly ice along with two bottles of ice water. On the go, I'll drink from the pack, but at rest stops, I can drink more easily from the bottles (I unscrew the tops). I can also fill or refill the bottles with non-water fluids so that I don't end up gumming up the CamelBak. The ice on my back helps keep me and my water cool in the Texas heat. The weight doesn't bother me a bit and I've never really noticed an increase in back sweat. Plus, it's just so much easier to have the water right there instead of having to reach down for a bottle.
     
  8. ejglows

    ejglows New Member

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    Two bottles on the bike re-filled when they are empty...

    I cannot imagine carrying weight on my back.

    e
     
  9. JREY

    JREY New Member

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    I personaly like using 2 water bottles. I have a camelpack, and have used it time to time, but don`t like the extra weight on my back. Also on hot days having the pack on your back prevents the sweat on your back from evaporating:eek: .
     
  10. ItsikH

    ItsikH New Member

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    When I was in the army I saw one rookie die of dehydration:eek: . I always take plenty of water, especially when in the desert. I have an extra bottle on the front of my bike, so I carry 2 liters on me. When I need more I use a saddle and take extra bottles - I once carried 6 liters on the bike! Still, I do get dehydrated occasionally, on very hot days.:(
     
  11. PALux

    PALux New Member

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    I commute with one water bottle only. On recreational rides I always have bottles and a 70 oz camelback that I change to 100 oz for longer hot rides. At 62 and carrying 60+ extra pounds already, some may think I should be arrested just for wearing bicycle jersey and shorts. I do put 4,500+ miles on my bikes annually though.

    Anyone that takes hydration lightly will hit a wall eventually. I drive SAG for our local club and have brought several dehydrated and cramped riders in. When you are on a century ride you cannot afford to be low on water leaving any rest stop. In most cases there are 30+ challenging miles ahead and not a convenience store or gas station the entire distance.

    As stated, real racers train with a support vehicle. Real racers pass me so fast that they don’t even see me. It’s the wannabes that sneer and spout fashion bull. The wannabes may train without support and limited hydration source. Someone will eventually pay, hopefully not with their life.
    Phil Lux
     
  12. Greyfox10025

    Greyfox10025 New Member

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    I use only bottles. Let the bike carry the weight. I don't need a couple of loose pounds sloshing around on my back. I do most of my multi-day unsupported rides in Europe. I refill in bars (which also sell beer) and asking them to refill a flopping water bladder would be kind of silly.
    www.TodMoore.net
     
  13. ganderctr

    ganderctr New Member

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    Bottles because they're cheaper. I never ride for more than 2 hours without stopping and that's how long bottles last me (I carry 2 bottles normally though I have 3 cages.) I thought of buying a camelbak for a century I was doing until I decided not to do the century. If I need more water I'll buy one of those seatpost-mounted bottle holders and rotate them out.
     
  14. starship

    starship New Member

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    Bottles for a short run.

    Camelpack:
    1) Holds more
    2) Stays colder
    3) Extra storage :eek:
     
  15. frequentflyer

    frequentflyer New Member

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    i also use both but not as you would guess. i use a small camelback with the bladder taken out and two nestle pure life water bottles shoved down in the bottom. this leaves me some space for a cigerrette tin where i keep money and a spare tube. the advantages to this are that i dont have to worry about cleaning and drying out the bladder and it also keeps me from gulping all my water too quickly.
     
  16. peloquma

    peloquma New Member

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    Bobby Julich got a bronze medal at the time trials with a camelbak, he used it couple of times on the Tour too. Seems to me that for a time trial, the aero vest will beat any type of water bottle set up.
     
  17. ricktoon

    ricktoon New Member

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    Man, you nailed me almost exactly. :D I have a camelback with water only for long road rides. Gatoraide in the water bottle. I also have a triple - great for climbing in Montana. And a mirror on my helmet - not the glasses.

    The point is I get our and ride, like a good 60-mile day, find that stores are few and far between here in Big Sky Country and look for tools that help me ride. That is the key in my mind.
    Rick
     
  18. domaindomain

    domaindomain New Member

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    Bottles for me.

    Just transferred to Sigg metal bottles from plastic and the difference is noticeable - the drink tastes how its meant to!

    Another excellent Swiss product that does its job and looks the part too.

    Cheers
     
  19. Hypnospin

    Hypnospin New Member

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    here in cycling, reality is often harsh. camelbacks are perhaps more functional but lack the serious cyclist factor. guys i know, they stash bottles the day before so they do not have to resort to the camelb.

    but when it get to 100andyoudonwaanaknow on the road, they will allow a longer ride. but i still know where to get cool water way out there. a firesation is always a good pick. watch out for nasty hosewater (unscrew the hose first) and ditch water taps.

    i would rather carry bottles in my jersey pockets than risk being seen with camelback, even when there will be few out here.

    as for riding without, this used to be a common training method, and some do still believe in heat acclimatization. if you do help youself.


     
  20. napcop

    napcop New Member

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    not really an answer, but a little insolicited advice instead....

    if you have a h2o bottle to spare, makes a nice place to stash an extra tube or other gear that doesn't rattle. Just make sure you get one with a wide mouth & without that narrow band below the wide mouth. right on & ride on.
     
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