camino de santiago on raod bike?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Nomisa, Mar 17, 2003.

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  1. Nomisa

    Nomisa Guest

    Anyone here do the Camino de Santiago on a road bike? I've heard mtbs or tourers with wide tires are
    necessary (or at least preferable), even if you stick to the road due to cobblestones, etc.

    I've got a Bianchi Eros, and I believe the widest tires I can get on it are 700x28.

    And my apolgies for crossposting to rec.bicycle.rides.
     
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  2. There are two routes; the pilgrims route and the road route. The Pilgrims route can be done by MTB
    bike, though the number of pedestrians on this footpath has to seen to be believed. The road route
    is OK, except for a piece od pseudo motorway outside one of the cities.

    Have a look at the write up on my web site and other search engine finds.

    nomisa wrote:
    > Anyone here do the Camino de Santiago on a road bike? I've heard mtbs or tourers with wide tires
    > are necessary (or at least preferable), even if you stick to the road due to cobblestones, etc.
    >
    > I've got a Bianchi Eros, and I believe the widest tires I can get on it are 700x28.
    >
    > And my apolgies for crossposting to rec.bicycle.rides.

    --
    Cheers,

    Wallace Shackleton. Kinross, Scotland.

    www.cyclekinross.org.uk
     
  3. Scatterbunny

    Scatterbunny Guest

    "nomisa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone here do the Camino de Santiago on a road bike? I've heard mtbs or tourers with wide tires
    > are necessary (or at least preferable), even if you stick to the road due to cobblestones, etc.
    >
    > I've got a Bianchi Eros, and I believe the widest tires I can get on it are 700x28.

    I did the Camino de Santiago on foot from Ronscesvalles to Santiago, so I know every inch of the
    way. I'm also a road bike rider. If you want my advice, I would not attempt it on a road bike on any
    sort of tyres. It is completely unsuitable for entire long stretches - even on strong touring tyres.

    What you could do, if you particularly wanted to do it on a road bike, is follow the ordinary roads
    that run parallel when you come to difficult sections. You don't have to clamber up the rocky ridge
    paths, but you can whizz along the tarmac that usually runs nearby!

    If you are doing it as an accredited pilgrim, you can still get your card stamped at the official
    points - regardless of the particular road taken. It depends what you are doing it for, really. I
    was walking it as a Franciscan friar, in habit and sandals, many years ago. The fact of doing a
    mediaeval route on foot seemed to require authenticity by following the exact pathways. On a road
    bike, I wouldn't even think about it.

    --
    Scatterbunny ~..~ ( ' )
     
  4. Scatterbunny

    Scatterbunny Guest

    "nomisa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone here do the Camino de Santiago on a road bike? I've heard mtbs or tourers with wide tires
    > are necessary (or at least preferable), even if you stick to the road due to cobblestones, etc.
    >
    > I've got a Bianchi Eros, and I believe the widest tires I can get on it are 700x28.

    I did the Camino de Santiago on foot from Ronscesvalles to Santiago, so I know every inch of the
    way. I'm also a road bike rider. If you want my advice, I would not attempt it on a road bike on any
    sort of tyres. It is completely unsuitable for entire long stretches - even on strong touring tyres.

    What you could do, if you particularly wanted to do it on a road bike, is follow the ordinary roads
    that run parallel when you come to difficult sections. You don't have to clamber up the rocky ridge
    paths, but you can whizz along the tarmac that usually runs nearby!

    If you are doing it as an accredited pilgrim, you can still get your card stamped at the official
    points - regardless of the particular road taken. It depends what you are doing it for, really. I
    was walking it as a Franciscan friar, in habit and sandals, many years ago. The fact of doing a
    mediaeval route on foot seemed to require authenticity by following the exact pathways. On a road
    bike, I wouldn't even think about it.

    --
    Scatterbunny ~..~ ( ' )
     
  5. Scatterbunny

    Scatterbunny Guest

    "nomisa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone here do the Camino de Santiago on a road bike? I've heard mtbs or tourers with wide tires
    > are necessary (or at least preferable), even if you stick to the road due to cobblestones, etc.
    >
    > I've got a Bianchi Eros, and I believe the widest tires I can get on it are 700x28.

    I did the Camino de Santiago on foot from Ronscesvalles to Santiago, so I know every inch of the
    way. I'm also a road bike rider. If you want my advice, I would not attempt it on a road bike on any
    sort of tyres. It is completely unsuitable for entire long stretches - even on strong touring tyres.

    What you could do, if you particularly wanted to do it on a road bike, is follow the ordinary roads
    that run parallel when you come to difficult sections. You don't have to clamber up the rocky ridge
    paths, but you can whizz along the tarmac that usually runs nearby!

    If you are doing it as an accredited pilgrim, you can still get your card stamped at the official
    points - regardless of the particular road taken. It depends what you are doing it for, really. I
    was walking it as a Franciscan friar, in habit and sandals, many years ago. The fact of doing a
    mediaeval route on foot seemed to require authenticity by following the exact pathways. On a road
    bike, I wouldn't even think about it.

    --
    Scatterbunny ~..~ ( ' )
     
  6. I did it with some friends on touring bikes from Barcelona into France and on to Santiago some years
    ago. I cycled it all, almost on road, doing a small bit off road. It was superb
     
  7. Jo Hardman

    Jo Hardman Guest

    "nomisa" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone here do the Camino de Santiago on a road bike? I've heard mtbs or tourers with wide tires
    > are necessary (or at least preferable), even if you stick to the road due to cobblestones, etc.
    >
    > I've got a Bianchi Eros, and I believe the widest tires I can get on it are 700x28.
    >
    > And my apolgies for crossposting to rec.bicycle.rides.
    The roads are fine. A very few places in small villages can be rough. I did it 18 months ago on a
    road bike. Beware of the descents, especially in the Montes De Orca, they are steep. Cyclists have
    died there. I crashed but was fortunately not seriously hurt. The descent to El Acebo is the one to
    particularly look out for. It is a brilliant trip. The whole experience is one you will not forget,
    I would recommend it to anyone.Jo
     
  8. From what I saw, I would tend to agree, no road bikes on the walking pilgrims route. The cyclists
    route is marked by yellow arrows with the dot. The descent down into Acebo has to be made carefully,
    even though the road through the village was resurfaced since the German was killed it is still very
    treacherous with large stones studded into the concrete surface. Apart from that, Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeee
    enjoy the descent! The only point to watch is the airport junction at Santiago. The old road was not
    marked and two of us ended up on the motorway (I understand that the police pounced very quickly)
    while my friend and I finished the last part on the pilgrims route. Hilly though it was that last
    day I could not have chosen a better way to finish the pilgrimage.

    Did any one else find the actual entry into Santiago to be a bit of an anti-climax?

    nomisa wrote:
    > Anyone here do the Camino de Santiago on a road bike? I've heard mtbs or tourers with wide tires
    > are necessary (or at least preferable), even if you stick to the road due to cobblestones, etc.
    >
    > I've got a Bianchi Eros, and I believe the widest tires I can get on it are 700x28.
    >
    > And my apolgies for crossposting to rec.bicycle.rides.

    --
    Cheers,

    Wallace Shackleton. Kinross, Scotland.

    www.cyclekinross.org.uk
     
  9. Jo Hardman

    Jo Hardman Guest

    "wallace.shackleton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The old road was not marked and two of us ended up on the motorway (I understand that the police
    > pounced very quickly) while my friend and I finished the last part on the pilgrims route. Hilly
    > though it was that last day I could not have chosen a better way to finish the pilgrimage.
    >
    > Did any one else find the actual entry into Santiago to be a bit of an anti-climax?
    >
    > I too got slightly lost for the first time around Santiago airport. The
    brilliant signposting all along the route seems to end there. The entry into the city is
    disappointing, as you arrive all geared up for some medieval experience, only to find yourself in a
    modern city. I actually had to ask the way to the cathedral! The man I asked looked at me as if I
    was mad for not knowing. Once I found myself in the Plaza Obradoirio (I know it's spelt wrong) it
    all became quite magical. I think the experience was heightened because the night before a dental
    abscess that had developed (painfully!) burst. This had caused me to be quite ill, fainting every
    time I tried to stand. I was sweating so much that I ended up crawling out of the refugio and lying
    on the cold concrete in the rain until I had cooled off sufficiently to be able to stand. I didn't
    tell anybody because I was afraid of being prevented from completing my ride the following day.
    Although I made very slow progress the next day, I did reach Santiago, several hours after I had
    expected to make it. I think you can see why I found reaching my destination so magical! A couple of
    days rest in Santiago meant I was fine by the time I flew home. Jo
     
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