Campagnolo Croce Daune chainset removal

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Fignon le Grand, Feb 20, 2006.

  1. Fignon le Grand

    Fignon le Grand New Member

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    Hi All

    I have recently purchased a 1989 Bianchi with a full Croce Daune groupset. I want to service the bottom bracket but Im not sure how to remove the chainset. I think it has the self extracting bolts but after it relases slightly it then tightens right up again and I dont want to force it too much as Im not sure im not going to damage it. Do I need to fiddle with the surrounding retention ring as part of the release procedure?

    While Im at it does anyone have any other tips. The derailleur looks like an interesting arrangement and the delta brakes are going to be fun!!

    thanks in advance
     
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  2. hd reynolds

    hd reynolds New Member

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    Corce d'Aune (pronounced CRO-CHE-DOWNY) another campy classic collectible, very nice. Anyways...

    The crankset is just a standard cotterless if am not mistaken - a crank puller should do it.

    The Delta brakes are similar in appearance from the front as Record but that is where the similarity end. The Croce has the caliper return spring at the back and outside the delta body while the inside has simpler and fewer mechanical arms for the cable pick up and caliper push mechanism. Aside from this the caliper mounting bolt is fixed (unlike record where the pads are stationary while the caliper body adjusts vertically) hence you cant adjust caliper height from the mount bolts but instead adjust the pads thu their mounting holes to achieve correct brake pad-rim contact.

    The derailleur is rather elegant and is a pre-index affair designed to work with what campy calls synchro shifting. It does not have a dropped parallelogram but features a slender articulating arm to assist the parallelogram... beautiful yes but I doubt the benefits.
     
  3. Fignon le Grand

    Fignon le Grand New Member

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    Thanks for the reply - Im not sure but the crankset looks like the self extracting type. my main concern is that I can undo it say 1/2 a turn but then it tightens right back up. Im a little worried about just hanging on the allen key as Im afraid it will round off or damage the threads
     
  4. hd reynolds

    hd reynolds New Member

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    A self extracting bolt's head is anchored securely as a dustcap. In the middle is an allen head. When loosening the fixing bolt, only the center or the allen head should rotate while the rest of the bolt head should remain fixed because this acts as the puller (as you loosen fixing bolt it pushes the inside of the dustcup).

    At any rate if you continue turning the allen bolt my guess is you'll most likely ruin only the self-sxtracting bolts (quite cheap and easy to replace). Just make sure the bolt head dustcap is secure and tight to avoid rounding off the crank dustcap threads.

    If you accidentally remove the self extracting bolt/dustcap without pulling the crank from the spindle you can still use a cotterless crank extractor.
     
  5. Fignon le Grand

    Fignon le Grand New Member

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    thanks alot ill try that!


    Next Ive got to get the synchro levers tuned up!!!! :eek:
     
  6. BigDog57

    BigDog57 New Member

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    The self extracting bolt should work fine but it will take quite a bit of pressure to loosen the crank. The loosening and then tightening that you describe is normal. I am pretty sure that the threading on the cranks is reverse of normal and requires a non-standard crank remover. If you require it your local bike shop should have one. Good Luck.
     
  7. hd reynolds

    hd reynolds New Member

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    Huh? U don't require a crank remover if you got self extracting bolts.
     
  8. BigDog57

    BigDog57 New Member

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    "If you accidentally remove the self extracting bolt/dustcap without pulling the crank from the spindle you can still use a cotterless crank extractor."

    If he does accidentally remove the self extracting bolts I am sure that he will find that on that vintage Campy crank the threads are reversed from normal and a regular crank remover will not thread on.
     
  9. Fignon le Grand

    Fignon le Grand New Member

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    Hi and thanks for all the response. I just bit the bullet and went for it they self extracted fine! There was just an initial stiffening up before it came of fine. Not sure it had ever been removed so was chuffed really. Thanks for the support
     
  10. hd reynolds

    hd reynolds New Member

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    I reckon u haven't heard of left-hand crank extractors. Park Tools have it (ref. Campagnolo 770) , specifically for this vintage cranks with 7mm self extracting bolts.
     
  11. BigDog57

    BigDog57 New Member

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    Yes friend, I thought it was obvious from my post that I have heard of the left hand crank extracter but thought perhaps that the OP had not and since you didn't mention it in your post I was explaining for his benefit. That piece of equipment is not typically found hanging on the rack at your LBS.
     
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