Campagnolo [Record/Chorus] Front Derailleur Chain Grinding

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by puma, Feb 20, 2005.

  1. puma

    puma New Member

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    Has anyone here setup their Campagnolo double front derailleur with no grinding of the chain on the cage when in ANY gear?

    My specific setup is:
    -Wipperman Connex 10 Speed Chain (campy 10 compatible)
    -Campy 11/21 cassette
    -Stronglight 39/53 chainwheels (Campy 10 compatible and NOT bent)
    -Record front derailleur (clamp-on)- I've tried both the Campagnolo Record pre-2004 (aluminum cage) and the new carbon cage one

    The issue is that I cannot get the chain to stop making contact with, and in effect, grinding against the derailleur cage when in either the largest or smallest cog. Basically, the cage just doesn't appear to be physically wide enough to allow the entire range of cogs to be shifted to without the chain touching. One example of the impossibility of all this is that I can setup the front derailleur to shift from the 39 chainwheel to the 53 chainwheel while on the 11-tooth cog with the smallest possible distance between the cage and the chain that results in silent operation, but after shifting to the 21-tooth cog, the chain will begin to grind against the cage. And again, I've tinkered with the physical location of the derailleur (both the angle of the cage to the chainwheels/chain and the height on mech on the frame seat tube) in most every way. And I know it simply shouldn't be this difficult, the rear setup was swift and flawless. So I'm guessing I just have an incompatibility problem (check out the setup above). Maybe the wipperman chain is just too wide, even if it's just a few millimeters.

    I'll make a stop off at a LBS to checkout their setups and ask some questions, but I think I've checked in the past, and they too, would grind to some degree (at least the display models). Unless someone knows why this is an issue, I'm just going to take the entire thing off and shift with my finger when necessary. Which might sound a bit ridiculous, but not really an issue for me, and even desirable in some ways, since I really only change chainwheels before and after big climbs. Plus, the bike runs completely silent, it makes for a lighter bike with less maintanence/cost, and not having one won't make the difference between ending up with the yellow jersey at the end of the day (at least not for me).

    Thanks for any suggestions.
     
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  2. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    Unlike Shimano, which just has one index stop for each chainring the Campy shifters have twelve. The idea is to be able to move the front derailleur in smaller increments, so you can fine tune the position like with a friction shifter.

    When you adjust the limit screws, set the chain on the big ring and the small cog, with the shifter all the way in that direction. Then the small ring and the big cog with the shifter all the way to that side. When you're riding you're going to have to shift through a few clicks to switch chainrings, but you have the ability to trim the front derailleur.
     
  3. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Shimano shifters also have trim.. :rolleyes:
     
  4. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Assuming the FD is positioned aligned and adjusted right, you use the small clicks in the shifter to TRIM the FD to get rid of derailer rub as you shift across the cassette! YOU SHOULDN'T BE CROSS CHAINING EITHER!!
     
  5. tcraero1

    tcraero1 New Member

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    If I find your finger following the race, will you give a reward for it?
     
  6. puma

    puma New Member

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    You know, in the past I've done the "trimming" thing, but I thought that was just a ghetto method to compensate for an incorrectly tuned derailleur (because as mentioned, the Shimano stuff didn't need to do this). But now I that you have so kindly enlightened me to the truth, I'll have to make a choice as to whether trimming is the way to go or my finger (I've got 8 of them to perfect my method).
     
  7. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Shimano stuff may or may not need it depending on variables like chainstay length. But it's there if you do. I rode shimano 7 and 8 speed SIT triples that didn't have it for years with no issues,but wasn't cross chaining either.
     
  8. tcraero1

    tcraero1 New Member

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    Ahh, I felt I had to resort to 'finger shifting' during a strenuous ride with some buddies rather than stop and do some adjusting. It went very well until my glove finger was caught by a tooth. I am told the resulting crash was nothing short of memorable.

    That was my second ride following the installation of my Record stuff. I learned two things...don't have the local MTB mechanic adjust your roadie equipment, and it is better to ride low gears than to loose a square foot or so of prime skin!
     
  9. Shredpirate

    Shredpirate New Member

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    Quick question. Whats cross chaining?
     
  10. serenaslu

    serenaslu New Member

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    I believe that Boud is just referring to the practice of riding Big/Big or Small/Small chainring/cog combinations (e.g. 53x23T or 39x12T on a 39/53T, 12-23 crankset/cassette drivetrain); causing more extreme chain angles.
     
  11. Jaguar27

    Jaguar27 New Member

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    The length of your Chain stay could be a factor when cross-chaining your Gears, my six13 can cross chain most gears, but not all...so I don't even try anymore...

    I found that setting the Durailleurs on both ends is more an art than a science...I had a problem with my rears this weekend and thanks to the help of a few members of this board I managed to figure it out...it took a lot of indexing up and down and some very fine adjustments to get it right...

    But to answer your question...my gruppo is as smooth as silk once it's adjusted correctly...as long as I don't exceed the cross chain limits...

    Hope this makes you feel better...and good luck!!
     
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