Campagnolo weight limits



rockhusky

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May 27, 2003
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anyone riding campagnolo record over the campagnolo "recommended" weight limit of 180lbs??

any stories/anecdotes/or advice?

thanks..
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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Originally posted by rockhusky
anyone riding campagnolo record over the campagnolo "recommended" weight limit of 180lbs??

any stories/anecdotes/or advice?

thanks..
It's a barge load of hooey.
 

jstraw

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Jan 16, 2004
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Does that mean you've got a barge load of you on a Record gruppo to prove it?

I'll be putting a barge load of me on Chorus as soon as the snow melts.
 

scottshields

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Aug 6, 2003
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Originally posted by rockhusky
anyone riding campagnolo record over the campagnolo "recommended" weight limit of 180lbs??

any stories/anecdotes/or advice?

thanks..

Where do you see this documented?

Scott Shields
 

rockhusky

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May 27, 2003
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Originally posted by boudreaux
Alot of that stuf is proven BS. If you buy it, I have a nice Brooklyn Bridge deal for ya.

so whats this deal youve got for me?

ha.

not saying i bought into it.. just want to know what the concensus is out there. its the best way to learn without actually having to break something to find out.

btw, if its proven bs, why print it? some kind of cover-your-own-ass kinda deal? im sure campagnolo products arent made of twigs.. why the need to cover?
 

Nitromike

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Dec 27, 2003
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His deal is that while he does have technical knowledge, he's lacking in social graces.
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Well, if you read the Campy company line on the matter, they stress that if there's a weight limit, it's a pliable one; the statement reads like bad politics. "There is no clear dividing line defining when someone is 'too heavy' for Campagnolo products. Many factors need to be considered," they mumble.

They're indicating little more than the obvious facts -- the bigger you are, the more likely you are to put greater stress on your equipment than a lighter person -- and similarly, the crazier the terrain you tackle, the quicker your stuff will wear out. Anything new there? Nah, I don't think so.

In other words, even if you're obscenely heavy or regularly ride on cobblestones, your stuff isn't necessarily more likely to catastrophically explode on your Sunday ride after 2 weeks... there's just a greater chance you'll want to replace something in 6 years instead of 8.

I'd wager that any person *small* enough to fit on a modern road bike can assume they won't be putting unsual stress on their drivetrain... at least not in a fashion contributing to sudden failures. Whatever. No worries.
 

rockhusky

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May 27, 2003
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Originally posted by lokstah
Well, if you read the Campy company line on the matter, they stress that if there's a weight limit, it's a pliable one; the statement reads like bad politics. "There is no clear dividing line defining when someone is 'too heavy' for Campagnolo products. Many factors need to be considered," they mumble.

They're indicating little more than the obvious facts -- the bigger you are, the more likely you are to put greater stress on your equipment than a lighter person -- and similarly, the crazier the terrain you tackle, the quicker your stuff will wear out. Anything new there? Nah, I don't think so.

In other words, even if you're obscenely heavy or regularly ride on cobblestones, your stuff isn't necessarily more likely to catastrophically explode on your Sunday ride after 2 weeks... there's just a greater chance you'll want to replace something in 6 years instead of 8.

I'd wager that any person *small* enough to fit on a modern road bike can assume they won't be putting unsual stress on their drivetrain... at least not in a fashion contributing to sudden failures. Whatever. No worries.

true. that makes a lot of sense. i dont plan on riding it like a nut over cobbles and crazy terrain. nice smooth roads if anything. it just confirms what i was hoping.. some cycle in the years timeframe and not the months.

and im just happy i fit on a modern bike. ha.
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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Originally posted by rockhusky


btw, if its proven bs, why print it? some kind of cover-your-own-ass kinda deal? im sure campagnolo products arent made of twigs.. why the need to cover?
It's CYA. Shimano does some of it too,but Campy really has the corner on the market.
 

puma

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Jul 23, 2003
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That weight limit probably only pertains to the seatpost a la ****. Besides, I think they know that people are going to disregard those types of "advisements" anyways, and if anything ever goes wrong, they may have the opportunity to fall back on the warning.
 

marlon1

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Jan 29, 2004
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weight doesn't matter for the groupset. only for the wheels, and maybe for the seatpost/saddle (so don't buy a pair hyperins or a san marco composite saddle or something).
 

mrowkoob

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Dec 23, 2003
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Well these a sensible areas to overweigth. And yes I have seen breakage to Record carbon seatposts and cranksets 2003 models(several). No I dont have scientific printout.Although keep in mind that the new carbon crankset is supposed to be vastly improved with multidirectional fibres. Otherwise it´s common sense. Why would weight have any influence on ergos or derailleurs? And why push your luck when even the manufacturer warns against it. FSA has no weightlimit on their carbon cranksets and a 10 year warranty so if you absolutely want carbon cranks I would buy those.
Having personally thrashed two sets of zipps and being just below 200 pounds I wouldt reccomend anyone to buy carbon wheels either if they were on the heavy side.
 

Eidetic

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Dec 19, 2003
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My experience, as a 85 kg rider, if you're heavy, and want a CF seatpost, get the Easton EC70, and do not get the Record seatpost; stay away from CF wheels ... I have Campy Eurus, which are AMAZING; and get beefy CF forks.

Has anyone seen CF forks fracture through normal use?
 
C

cycleboy

Guest
Originally posted by rockhusky
anyone riding campagnolo record over the campagnolo "recommended" weight limit of 180lbs??

any stories/anecdotes/or advice?

thanks..

I weight 209 (down from 238) and ride a steel De Rosa with full Campy Record including Record Ti seatpost. Wheels are 32 OP's (14/15) on Record hubs.

I have about 3000 mi over fairly smooth surfaces. I have not had any problems or seen any evidence of over-stressing. In Campy's defense, they say that there are a variety of factors such as body weight, road surface, riding style, maintenance, etc. which can contribute to component failure so a single body weight alone can not be estalished. But as others have said I'm sure they error on the side of safety where liability for injury or death is involved.

I have read that the first generation Campy carbon seatposts and cranks had some problems and they changed the fiber orientation in the next generation.

Good luck.