Campy chain - are they kidding?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Richard, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Somehow, I ended up at the Campy site and read
    instructions for the 10-spd chain. Besides their tool (I
    do like the way it locks things into place!), the pin is
    two-piece, and they claim the chain has a definite right
    and left side. Furthermore, the chain must be installed by
    pushing in the pin from beneath the BB. Finally, if you
    remove the chain, you need to cut out 7 link pieces and
    replace this string with their special 7-link section (and
    two more 2-piece pins).

    After reading all this, do they expect anyone except
    professional team mechanics to buy their tool and chain and
    go through this?
     
    Tags:


  2. Jim Flom

    Jim Flom Guest

    Konex makes a perfectly good 10-speed chain for much less.
    It also has a right and left side but is very easy to
    install (no pin to push per se). I misinstalled it the first
    time around and it shifted fine but left me with a bit of a
    hop in the chain in the smallest cog until Peter Chisolm
    suggested I reverse the master link.

    Jim Flom

    "richard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Somehow, I ended up at the Campy site and read
    > instructions for the 10-spd chain. Besides their tool (I
    > do like the way it locks things into
    place!),
    > the pin is two-piece, and they claim the chain has a
    > definite right and left side. Furthermore, the chain must
    > be installed by pushing in the pin from beneath the BB.
    > Finally, if you remove the chain, you need to cut
    out
    > 7 link pieces and replace this string with their special
    > 7-link section (and two more 2-piece pins).
    >
    > After reading all this, do they expect anyone except
    > professional team mechanics to buy their tool and chain
    > and go through this?
     
  3. Jim Flom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Konex makes a perfectly good 10-speed chain for much less.

    That would be the "ConneX" chain by Wippermann.

    -as
     
  4. Jim Flom

    Jim Flom Guest

    "Antti Salonen"
    <[email protected]> wrote ...
    >
    > That would be the "ConneX" chain by Wippermann.

    Indeed.
     
  5. richard-<< Besides their tool (I do like the way it locks
    things into place!), the pin is two-piece, and they claim
    the chain has a definite right and left side. Furthermore,
    the chain must be installed by pushing in the pin from
    beneath the BB. Finally, if you remove the chain, you need
    to cut out 7 link pieces and replace this string with their
    special 7-link section (and two more 2-piece pins).

    After reading all this, do they expect anyone except
    professional team mechanics to buy their tool and chain and
    go through this? >><BR><BR>

    Well in reality, you don't need the 'tool', just like you
    didn't need the permalink tool(a chaintool and a dime worked
    fine). Plus I'll bet that the 'teams' change chains more
    than they clean them and if they do, i am sure they use a
    snaplink, like the connex one.

    For you-install the pin, when it comes to cleaning, buy a
    snap link OR get a Connex chain to start with...

    Use a well made chaintool, push the pin in straight. All
    that is unique about the Campagnolo tool(I have one) is tht
    it has little push thru gizmo that holds the plates stable
    while you push the pin thru. It doubles as a really nice
    chaintool.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    richard wrote:

    > Somehow, I ended up at the Campy site and read
    > instructions for the 10-spd chain. Besides their tool (I
    > do like the way it locks things into place!), the pin is
    > two-piece, and they claim the chain has a definite right
    > and left side. Furthermore, the chain must be installed by
    > pushing in the pin from beneath the BB. Finally, if you
    > remove the chain, you need to cut out 7 link pieces and
    > replace this string with their special 7-link section (and
    > two more 2-piece pins).
    >
    > After reading all this, do they expect anyone except
    > professional team mechanics to buy their tool and chain
    > and go through this?

    We build a lot of Campagnolo equipped bikes - more than any
    shop of my acquaintance. We don't use their chain at all.

    I keep one each model in stock and sell under ten a year
    over the counter.

    We're building with KMC mostly and we love them. Nice
    snaplink. We also use Wippermann and SRAM chain.
    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1
    April, 1971
     
  7. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    A Muzi wrote ...
    > We build a lot of Campagnolo equipped bikes - more
    > than any shop of my acquaintance. We don't use their
    > chain at all.
    >
    Agree the others are better but the real problem with
    the Campy chain is the lousy link. Change to a Connex
    and its a liveable solution - just make sure it goes on
    the right way up.

    best, Andrew (who didn't get to use his 11 until he learnt
    which was up)
     
  8. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 07:54:38 GMT, "Andrew Price"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Change to a Connex and its a liveable solution - just make
    >sure it goes on the right way up.

    I've had good luck with the IRD 10sp chain which also comes
    with a link. I use Shimano 9sp chain and Sram Powerlink II
    and that works fine too.
     
  9. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    >After reading all this, do they expect anyone except
    >professional team mechanics to buy their tool and chain and
    >go through this?

    Of course not. They give it to them for free. It's nice
    being sponsored.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > A Muzi wrote ...
    >>We build a lot of Campagnolo equipped bikes - more
    >>than any shop of my acquaintance. We don't use their
    >>chain at all.

    Andrew Price wrote:
    > Agree the others are better but the real problem with
    > the Campy chain is the lousy link. Change to a Connex
    > and its a liveable solution - just make sure it goes on
    > the right way up.

    I have to say I don't understand Wippermann's instructions
    about reversing the snaplink for use with an 11t cog.

    I mean, it is symmetric so what could change? In the same
    vein, what's up with this?

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/shim10cn.jpg

    I really cannot understand what could make any difference
    with the chain joint one way or the other

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1
    April, 1971
     
  11. Jim Flom

    Jim Flom Guest

    "A Muzi" wrote ...

    > I really cannot understand what could make any difference
    > with the chain joint one way or the other

    That's why in my first post in this thread I had that bit of
    hop in the chain until P. Chisholm (as explained above)
    suggested I reverse the link. I had an 11-tooth cog on at
    the time. Reversing the snaplink eliminated the hop.
     
  12. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > I have to say I don't understand Wippermann's instructions
    > about reversing the snaplink for use with an 11t cog.
    >
    > I mean, it is symmetric so what could change? In the same
    > vein, what's up with this?
    >
    > http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/shim10cn.jpg
    >
    > I really cannot understand what could make any difference
    > with the chain joint one way or the other

    Hi, maybe you could explain to me how to identify the
    different link pins. The instructions that came with my DA
    RD-7700-GS rear derailleur, include chain pin instructions.
    It says: "The chain will be damaged if it is cut at a place
    where it has been joined with a reinforced connecting pin or
    an end pin."

    Ok a reinforced connecting pin[rcp], is one of the
    replacement pins. Another words, don't remove a pin in the
    same place, more than once. But, what is an end pin? They
    have an illustration, but it isn't clear, seeing as the rcp
    is in the same position as an end pin would be. How do I
    identify the link pins and the end pins?

    I did just use one of the links that looked like most of the
    rest. I did find the original rcp and avoided it. When my
    LBS mechanic showed me how do install the chain, he only
    mentioned not removing the same pin.

    Here is a link to the instructions: http://bike.shimano.com-
    /product_images/RD/si_images/RD_7700_SI.pdf

    Thank you, Jeff
     
  13. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > "A Muzi" wrote ...
    >>I really cannot understand what could make any difference
    >>with the chain joint one way or the other

    Jim Flom wrote:
    > That's why in my first post in this thread I had that bit
    > of hop in the chain until P. Chisholm (as explained above)
    > suggested I reverse the link. I had an 11-tooth cog on at
    > the time. Reversing the snaplink eliminated the hop.

    I got a better look at the Wippermann. Any ideas on the
    Shimano admonition?

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/shim10cn.jpg

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1
    April, 1971
     
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