Campy drivetrain difficulties, advice please...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Tony The Tiger, Apr 6, 2003.

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  1. Here's my setup: Cannondale CAAD5 frame, Chorus 9 speed ergo shifters, Shimano 9 speed Ultegra
    cassette, Campy 10 speed Record Triple FD, BB, Crankset, RD. Sachs PC69 9 speed chain.

    Here's the problem: When in the middle (42) chainring and the lower two (12, 13) rear sprockets, the
    chain rubs against the inside of the large (53) chainring.

    What is the solution? Change to a narrower (10s chain)? Other ideas?

    Thank you kindly for any advice.

    TG
     
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  2. On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 18:04:45 -0400, tony the tiger wrote:

    > Here's my setup: Cannondale CAAD5 frame, Chorus 9 speed ergo shifters, Shimano 9 speed Ultegra
    > cassette, Campy 10 speed Record Triple FD, BB, Crankset, RD. Sachs PC69 9 speed chain.
    >
    > Here's the problem: When in the middle (42) chainring and the lower two (12, 13) rear sprockets,
    > the chain rubs against the inside of the large
    > (53) chainring.
    >
    > What is the solution? Change to a narrower (10s chain)? Other ideas?

    Shift to the big ring?
     
  3. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 18:04:45 -0400, tony the tiger wrote:
    >
    > > Here's my setup: Cannondale CAAD5 frame, Chorus 9 speed ergo shifters, Shimano 9 speed Ultegra
    > > cassette, Campy 10 speed Record Triple FD, BB, Crankset, RD. Sachs PC69 9 speed chain.
    > >
    > > Here's the problem: When in the middle (42) chainring and the lower two (12, 13) rear sprockets,
    > > the chain rubs against the inside of the large
    > > (53) chainring.
    > >
    > > What is the solution? Change to a narrower (10s chain)? Other ideas?
    >
    > Shift to the big ring?
    Agree or you should be able to "trim" your ergo lever to stop the rubbing...
     
  4. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "bfd" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 18:04:45 -0400, tony the tiger wrote:
    > >
    > > > Here's my setup: Cannondale CAAD5 frame, Chorus 9 speed ergo
    shifters,
    > > > Shimano 9 speed Ultegra cassette, Campy 10 speed Record Triple FD, BB, Crankset, RD. Sachs
    > > > PC69 9 speed chain.
    > > >
    > > > Here's the problem: When in the middle (42) chainring and the lower
    two
    > > > (12, 13) rear sprockets, the chain rubs against the inside of the
    large
    > > > (53) chainring.
    > > >
    > > > What is the solution? Change to a narrower (10s chain)? Other ideas?
    > >
    > > Shift to the big ring?
    > Agree or you should be able to "trim" your ergo lever to stop the
    rubbing...
    >

    Bzzzzt. Wrong answer. You cannot stop the chain from dragging on the big ring by "trimming" the
    front derailer. As someone else mentioned, the poster should just avoid the extreme chain angles.
    Those gears are represented elsewhere.

    Robin Hubert
     
  5. Pete Geurds

    Pete Geurds Guest

    >Here's the problem: When in the middle (42) chainring and the lower two (12, 13) rear sprockets,
    >the chain rubs against the inside of the large (53) chainring.

    Me: Doctor, it hurts when I do that. Doctor: Well....... don't do that!

    I try to shift to the big ring when I'm roughly in the middle of the freewheel, oops, cassette.

    Pete Geurds Douglassville, PA
     
  6. > > Shift to the big ring?
    > Agree or you should be able to "trim" your ergo lever to stop the rubbing...

    Well, I ride in very rolling terrrain and sometimes I like to stay in the middle ring on the short
    downhills so I don't have to shift back into it in less than 1 minute when the uphill begins.

    As far as trimming w/the ergo lever, that does nothing to help the problem as the front derailleur
    does not rub anything, the chain rubs on the inside of the large chainring.

    Anyone out there with helpful solutions?

    TG
     
  7. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    tony the tiger wrote:
    > As far as trimming w/the ergo lever, that does nothing to help the problem as the front derailleur
    > does not rub anything, the chain rubs on the inside of the large chainring.
    >
    > Anyone out there with helpful solutions?

    Welll... the previous posters who said "shift to the big ring" had a point, but if you *don't want*
    to do that, there is another option:

    Get a BB with adjustable chainline and shift the crank about 1-2mm right. (Alternately, maybe just
    get a longer spindle). The old Athena BB's were great for this, or a Phil Wood will do the trick.
    This may cause other problems in other places, though - enough to make this a bad idea; you'll have
    to try it and find out.

    Curiously enough, on my campy 9sp with triple, the chainline suggested the crank was too far away
    from the frame, so I've shifted my Athena BB in the other direction about 1.5mm. Upside: good
    chainline (yes, I *have* checked frame alignment). Downside: BB cups that were intended to mount
    flush to the BB shell stick out 1.5mm on the left, and 1.5mm of shell thread shows on the right.
    Also, I had to do some judicious filing of the front derailleur arms where they hit the frame at the
    lower limit. 8000 miles later, though, it's worked well for me.

    Hope this makes your cornflakes taste better,
    --
    Mark Janeba remove antispam phrase in address to reply
     
  8. On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 15:04:45 +0000, tony the tiger wrote:

    > Here's my setup: Cannondale CAAD5 frame, Chorus 9 speed ergo shifters, Shimano 9 speed Ultegra
    > cassette, Campy 10 speed Record Triple FD, BB, Crankset, RD. Sachs PC69 9 speed chain.
    >
    > Here's the problem: When in the middle (42) chainring and the lower two (12, 13) rear sprockets,
    > the chain rubs against the inside of the large (53) chainring.

    You don't need to use those gears. You can get essentially the same gears with the big ring and a
    bigger cog. Most chains will rub in those situations, and if not, then the chainrings are probably
    too far apart, which can cause worse problems.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Deserves death! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve _`\(,_ | death. And some that die
    deserve life. Can you give it to (_)/ (_) | them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in
    judgement. -- J. R. R. Tolkein
     
  9. On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 19:00:01 +0000, tony the tiger wrote:

    > Well, I ride in very rolling terrrain and sometimes I like to stay in the middle ring on the short
    > downhills so I don't have to shift back into it in less than 1 minute when the uphill begins.

    Heck, rolling terrain is perfect for "alpine" gearing -- which most folks use. Shift the front from
    big to middle, for the same cog in the back, and you have uphill/downhill taken care of with one
    shift rather than 3.

    > Anyone out there with helpful solutions?

    If you insist on using these long-reach combinations despite advice not to, then get chainring
    spacers to move the big ring out a bit. These are just washers that go between the spider and the
    ring. The downside of this is that, if there is too much added space the chain can drop between
    the big and middle rings. But maybe you can get enough extra space before this becomes a problem.
    Bike shops tend to have just the right size spacers; hardware store washers will have to be ground
    down to fit.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | There is always an easy solution to every human problem - neat, _`\(,_ | plausible, and
    wrong. --H.L. Mencken (_)/ (_) |
     
  10. John Carrier

    John Carrier Guest

    Pretty typical behavior. A function of short chainstays and fairly large chain angles. You can
    install a small spacer (perhaps 1-2mm) to move the chainline outboard. Of course this will not have
    a favorable impact on the 53 + largest cog combination.

    R / John
     
  11. tgeraci-<< Here's my setup: Cannondale CAAD5 frame, Chorus 9 speed ergo shifters, Shimano 9 speed
    Ultegra cassette, Campy 10 speed Record Triple FD, BB, Crankset, RD. Sachs PC69 9 speed chain. <<
    Here's the problem: When in the middle (42) chainring and the lower two (12, 13) rear sprockets, the
    chain rubs against the inside of the large (53) chainring.

    Have the Record triple BB?

    Not sure why, we have installed this a lot w/o the problem you mention.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  12. "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 15:04:45 +0000, tony the tiger wrote:
    >
    >
    > You don't need to use those gears. You can get essentially the same gears with the big ring and a
    > bigger cog. Most chains will rub in those situations, and if not, then the chainrings are probably
    > too far apart, which can cause worse problems.

    Thanks to all for your responses. Sounds like the best solution is to just learn to use the large
    chainring more. Just never had this problem with my Veloce triple or Ultegra triple, so wondered if
    there was anything specific to the setup that was contributing. Probably it is the thinner large 10s
    chainring offset slightly towards the middle ring that makes the rubbing happen, and it does sound
    like using the large chainring more is the easiest, if not only, solution.

    TG
     
  13. Mark Janeba <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hope this makes your cornflakes taste better,

    Cornflakes never taste good. Tony the Tiger only eats FROSTED flakes.
     
  14. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 19:00:01 +0000, tony the tiger wrote:
    >
    > > Well, I ride in very rolling terrrain and sometimes I like to stay in the middle ring on the
    > > short downhills so I don't have to shift back into it in less than 1 minute when the uphill
    > > begins.
    >
    > Heck, rolling terrain is perfect for "alpine" gearing -- which most folks use. Shift the front
    > from big to middle, for the same cog in the back, and you have uphill/downhill taken care of with
    > one shift rather than 3.
    >
    > > Anyone out there with helpful solutions?
    >
    > If you insist on using these long-reach combinations despite advice not to, then get chainring
    > spacers to move the big ring out a bit. These are just washers that go between the spider and the
    > ring. The downside of this is that, if there is too much added space the chain can drop between
    > the big and middle rings. But maybe you can get enough extra space before this becomes a problem.
    > Bike shops tend to have just the right size spacers; hardware store washers will have to be ground
    > down to fit.

    Also, poster could use a 42T inner ring instead of the 39. This will also help (but has
    drawbacks as well).

    Robin Hubert
     
  15. > Have the Record triple BB?
    >
    > Not sure why, we have installed this a lot w/o the problem you mention.
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria

    Yes, have the Record Triple BB.

    TG
     
  16. Terry Rudd

    Terry Rudd Guest

    Tony,

    tony the tiger wrote:
    >>>Shift to the big ring?
    >>
    >>Agree or you should be able to "trim" your ergo lever to stop the rubbing...
    >
    >
    > Well, I ride in very rolling terrrain and sometimes I like to stay in the middle ring on the short
    > downhills so I don't have to shift back into it in less than 1 minute when the uphill begins.
    >
    > As far as trimming w/the ergo lever, that does nothing to help the problem as the front derailleur
    > does not rub anything, the chain rubs on the inside of the large chainring.
    >
    > Anyone out there with helpful solutions?

    Tony, if you are rubbing on the 12T, while in the middle ring (assuming you don't have an 11T as
    your smallest), you are kind of stuck, especially if the bike has performance oriented short chain
    stays. No matter how you do it, optimizing for the 12T will give you an equally bad chain angle with
    your largest cog. You should be able to use the 13T though, which suggests perhaps a minor chain
    line problem.

    You could look to getting an adjustable bottom bracket but they are darned expensive if you want
    something that works correctly with Campagnolo cranks and is durable.

    I do not agree with using chainring spacers to push the large ring out since it increases the risk
    that the chain will miss shift from the middle ring to the large ring and indeed could jam between
    them. A 10s chain will not help since it is narrower but really just a tiny bit.

    Measure your bottom bracket and see if reversing it gives you a 1 - 2mm advantage moving the crank
    outward from the bottom bracket but don't go beyond that. I also don't recommend much experimenting
    here since each time you pull a crank and re-torque it on a square taper spindle, you squish it on a
    bit more. With a new chain line, if you clear the 13T easily and even the 12T, you will almost
    certainly have problems with two or more of your lower gears, especially while in the big ring.

    Good Luck

    Terry

    >
    > TG
     
  17. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    tony the tiger wrote:
    > Mark Janeba <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>Hope this makes your cornflakes taste better,
    >
    >
    > Cornflakes never taste good. Tony the Tiger only eats FROSTED flakes.

    Oops - my mistake! I shoulda known that.
    --
    Mark Janeba remove antispam phrase in address to reply
     
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