Campy ELECTRONIC Record grouppo even closer!!!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Campy Addict, Mar 29, 2003.

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  1. Campy Addict

    Campy Addict Guest

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  2. What does this do that the cabled 10 speed doesn't do? Quicker shifts? Well my Campy 10 feels like
    it is electric already. Lighter? I suppose if a few nanoseconds and grams makes a difference then
    your a racer, and if you are, most everyone will have it anyway and then there may be no advantage.
    GJ <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > More sightings (and pictures) of the electronic grouppo on the road March 20, 2003!!!
    >
    > http://campyonly.com/rumors/new_electronic_record_2.html
    >
    > Can't wait!
    >
    > I wonder if I can pre-order it from Peter in Boulder?
     
  3. Some Moron

    Some Moron Guest

    Gee, terrific.

    I wouldn't even pedal across the street without electronic shifting.
     
  4. Gazoo

    Gazoo Guest

    yeah and maybe next they'll put motors on em so I don't have to pedal!!!
    --
    ______________________________________

    "It's never too late to have a happy childhood."
    ______________________________________
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > More sightings (and pictures) of the electronic grouppo on the road March 20, 2003!!!
    >
    > http://campyonly.com/rumors/new_electronic_record_2.html
    >
    > Can't wait!
    >
    > I wonder if I can pre-order it from Peter in Boulder?
    >
    >

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.463 / Virus Database: 262 - Release Date: 3/17/2003
     
  5. A. Birko

    A. Birko Guest

  6. campy-<< Can't wait!

    I wonder if I can pre-order it from Peter in Boulder?

    Order away-require 100% deposit(about $2500) and expect to wait until October of 2004 or so...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  7. << Could this be lighter than full mechanical?

    Mostly carbon front and rear der and w/o the shift guts and cables/housing, they say it is.....

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  8. Campy Addict

    Campy Addict Guest

    I'm not buying it for the weight savings, its the tech factor that I'm getting it for. Electronic is
    the wave of the future. Just the idea that my bike still needs human power to move things makes me
    ill. I want to push a button. No one drives cars like the Flintstones do so why should we ride bikes
    like them?

    After all the screaming and crying foul of many in here I'd bet that within 4 years or so - say fall
    2008 - most of you will have upgraded to the electronic shifting and be wishing you started using it
    in 2004 like me!!!

    ><< Could this be lighter than full mechanical?
    >
    >Mostly carbon front and rear der and w/o the shift guts and cables/housing, they say it is.....
     
  9. [email protected] wrote:
    > I'm not buying it for the weight savings, its the tech factor that I'm getting it for. Electronic
    > is the wave of the future. Just the idea that my bike still needs human power to move things
    > makes me ill.

    Nice troll, get a car if human power offends you.

    Are you using power-assist bicycle brakes, or are you satisfied with hydraulics, or are you still
    using those antiquated cable things?

    > I want to push a button. No one drives cars like the Flintstones do so why should we ride bikes
    > like them?

    > After all the screaming and crying foul of many in here I'd bet that within 4 years or so - say
    > fall 2008 - most of you will have upgraded to the electronic shifting and be wishing you started
    > using it in 2004 like me!!!

    I'm waiting for the electromechanical (this shifting stuff is electromechanical, not electronic)
    Campy off road singlespeed gruppo before switching. Until 2008, shut up, have fun, and ride bike.
     
  10. Well don't forget the disc brakes while you're getting all teched-out. ;-)

    Saw someone at a Knoxville TN roadrace this weekend on what appeared to be a new Litespeed Vortex,
    save no decals and sporting front and rear disc brakes; frame mounts and all.

    SB

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm not buying it for the weight savings, its the tech factor that I'm getting it for. Electronic
    > is the wave of the future. Just the idea that my bike still needs human power to move things makes
    > me ill. I want to push a button. No one drives cars like the Flintstones do so why should we ride
    > bikes like them?
    >
    > After all the screaming and crying foul of many in here I'd bet that within 4 years or so - say
    > fall 2008 - most of you will have upgraded to the electronic shifting and be wishing you started
    > using it in 2004 like me!!!
    >
    > ><< Could this be lighter than full mechanical?
    > >
    > >Mostly carbon front and rear der and w/o the shift guts and
    cables/housing,
    > >they say it is.....
     
  11. "Steve Blankenship" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Well don't forget the disc brakes while you're getting all teched-out. ;-)
    >
    > Saw someone at a Knoxville TN roadrace this weekend on what appeared to be a new Litespeed Vortex,
    > save no decals and sporting front and rear disc brakes; frame mounts and all.
    >

    Well, it was only a matter of time before discs moved on from competitive MTBing to other areas of
    racing - Kinesis and Cannondale both make disc-specific cyclo-cross frames, but haven't seen either
    of them being used at UK races so far.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  12. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Steve Blankenship" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > steve-<< Saw someone at a Knoxville TN roadrace this weekend on what
    > appeared
    > > to be a new Litespeed Vortex, save no decals and sporting front and rear disc brakes; frame
    > > mounts and all.
    > >
    > > When disc brakes become a sort of standard on everyday road bikes, is
    the
    > day I
    > > quit bicycles...
    >
    > Careful what you say, Peter. You should have seen the gawkers checking it out - raw, unchecked
    > gizmo envy.
    >
    > Heck; considering it was raining, they might have even served some useful purpose. Nahhhh... ;-)
    >
    > SB
    >
    I can see using discs on a road bike for say, the spring classics in Belgium or the rain in the NW,
    but for every day? Nope.

    'Cross bikes are a different critter though. 'Cept for around San Diego, where it never rains!

    Mike
     
  13. "Just the idea that my bike still needs human power to move things makes me
    ill. I want to push a button. "

    So I guess you'll be wanting a motor to "move" the bike too ;-)

    The fact that bikes aren't electronic is one of the things I like about them. Why would I want yet
    another device to be run by a battery? Riding a bike it a great escape from the electronic based
    world we now live in.

    Although, I do enjoy the feedback from my HRM -- so I'm not totally electronic or battery free when
    out pedaling my mechanical machine. -Keith
     
  14. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    "Steve Blankenship" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > steve-<< Saw someone at a Knoxville TN roadrace this weekend on what
    > appeared
    > > to be a new Litespeed Vortex, save no decals and sporting front and rear disc brakes; frame
    > > mounts and all.
    > >
    > > When disc brakes become a sort of standard on everyday road bikes, is the
    > day I
    > > quit bicycles...
    >
    > Careful what you say, Peter. You should have seen the gawkers checking it out - raw, unchecked
    > gizmo envy.
    >
    > Heck; considering it was raining, they might have even served some useful purpose. Nahhhh... ;-)
    >
    I don't get it. Doesn't adding disc brakes, including all hardware and frame mounts, ADD weight to a
    bike? I thought people wanted the "lightest" road bike possible to help them get UP the hill. I can
    understand disc brakes for tandems. I can even see them on some mt. bikes that go through alot of
    mud. But road bikes? What do disc brakes add, except for weight, that current brakes don't already
    do. As for the subject heading, until they can come up with a reliable shifting system that can be
    recharged, I stick to "manual" shifting STI/Ergo levers thank you.
     
  15. Rman

    Rman Guest

    I can picture it now. You're riding a stage of the tour and have you eShifters programmed to change
    at critical moments for you, then blue screen of death, blame Windows2008 and Bill Gates for not
    picking up the yellow jersey.........

    "Terry Rudd" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Ah Peter,
    >
    >[snip

    > Now, if you start having to get firmware downloads off the Internet to improve shifting- that
    > might be time to quit :cool:
    >
    > Terry
    >
    >
    >[snip]
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >It's coming, Peter. The new XTR discs address the weight issue fairly well. It's not much of a
    >stretch to imagine a Dura ace road set that's even lighter. If discs could be made practically as
    >light as calipers (not yet), run drag free (like my Hayes hydraulics right now) and give superior
    >braking (done), why wouldn't you want to use them? Moving the braking surface off the rims would
    >also allow some rim shape changes that could save a bit of weight.

    You would also need to get a beefier fork to use disk brakes. That may offset any potential weight
    savings. Also, what is wrong with current brakes? If your brakes are not providing all the braking
    power you need, you may want to review your set up and make some changes.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  17. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >>It's coming, Peter. The new XTR discs address the weight issue fairly well. It's not much of a
    >>stretch to imagine a Dura ace road set that's even lighter. If discs could be made practically as
    >>light as calipers (not yet), run drag free (like my Hayes hydraulics right now) and give superior
    >>braking (done), why wouldn't you want to use them? Moving the braking surface off the rims would
    >>also allow some rim shape changes that could save a bit of weight.
    >
    >
    > You would also need to get a beefier fork to use disk brakes. That may offset any potential weight
    > savings. Also, what is wrong with current brakes? If your brakes are not providing all the braking
    > power you need, you may want to review your set up and make some changes.

    I have hundreds of hours on the following 2 setups:

    The Hayes hydraulics on MTB my provide all the power I need.

    The Avid Shorty 4s (often mentioned here as one of the best cantilever setups) on my cyclocross bike
    are set up just fine. I even recently got those Kool Stop Salmon pads that get the rave reviews
    here. They are distinctly lacking (power, modulation, need for frequent adjustment due to pad wear
    etc) compared to the disc setup. The Shortys are lighter and cheaper, but other than those 2
    factors, the discs are superior.
     
  18. Terry Rudd

    Terry Rudd Guest

    Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    >
    <snip>

    >
    > You would also need to get a beefier fork to use disk brakes.

    Yes. I agree the fork would need to be stronger but that doesn't necessarily mean
    substantially heavier.

    > That may offset any potential weight savings.

    I don't think weight savings will be the value. I agree with Peter, power is not the problem.
    Removing abrasive brake pads from the rim's sidewalls will be the value, IMO.

    >Also, what is wrong with current brakes? If your brakes are not providing all the braking power you
    >need, you may want to review your set up and make some changes.

    Frankly, I think todays brakes are great all around. When I think back to the risks I took on my old
    Mafacs, compaired to my modern Chorus brakes, it is almost mind-boggling. But I think it would be
    ideal to remove the braking from the rim surface. I am not sure I would ever spend real money
    retro-fiting that. Further, I am not sure I could tolerate the complexity of managing disk brakes on
    any bike but especially my road bikes- (today's road brakes are so simple to manage!) But, still the
    idea appeals to me.

    Terry
     
  19. Jon G

    Jon G Guest

    scott <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<hfQia.10615$de
    > I have hundreds of hours on the following 2 setups:

    > The Hayes hydraulics on MTB my provide all the power I need.

    > The Avid Shorty 4s (often mentioned here as one of the best cantilever setups) on my cyclocross
    > bike are set up just fine. I even recently got those Kool Stop Salmon pads that get the rave
    > reviews here. They are distinctly lacking (power, modulation, need for frequent adjustment due to
    > pad wear etc) compared to the disc setup.

    There's an important disconnect here that no one seems to have noticed:

    Peter is referring to the adequacy of caliper brakes for ROAD bikes-- Campy and perhaps to a lesser
    degree Shimano, and I agree it's difficult to fault these units. All the power, smoothness and
    modulation one could ask for on the road.

    ...While Scott refers directly to off-road brakes-- in particular canti's, to which I also agree
    that much is left to be desired, as I too have recent Avid's w/ the revered salmon pads, and
    although they work 'well-enough', even when using exact same wheels they are NO match for road
    brakes in smoothness, modulation, etc. despite extensive setup efforts. I wish I could run Campy's
    or their equivalent on my cross bike.

    --jon
     
  20. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    "jon g" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > scott <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<hfQia.10615$de
    > > I have hundreds of hours on the following 2 setups:
    >
    > > The Hayes hydraulics on MTB my provide all the power I need.
    >
    > > The Avid Shorty 4s (often mentioned here as one of the best cantilever setups) on my cyclocross
    > > bike are set up just fine. I even recently got those Kool Stop Salmon pads that get the rave
    > > reviews here. They are distinctly lacking (power, modulation, need for frequent adjustment due
    > > to pad wear etc) compared to the disc setup.
    >
    > There's an important disconnect here that no one seems to have noticed:
    >
    > Peter is referring to the adequacy of caliper brakes for ROAD bikes-- Campy and perhaps to a
    > lesser degree Shimano, and I agree it's difficult to fault these units. All the power, smoothness
    > and modulation one could ask for on the road.
    >
    > ...While Scott refers directly to off-road brakes-- in particular canti's, to which I also agree
    > that much is left to be desired, as I too have recent Avid's w/ the revered salmon pads, and
    > although they work 'well-enough', even when using exact same wheels they are NO match for road
    > brakes in smoothness, modulation, etc. despite extensive setup efforts. I wish I could run Campy's
    > or their equivalent on my cross bike.
    >
    The problem is Scott keeps stating that disc brakes will soon be commonplace on ROAD bikes. However,
    like you cited, the examples of his use are either off-road or cross. I agree that for tandem, mt.
    bikes and possibly cross bikes, where great loads are carried or the bike is ridden through lots of
    mud and poor weather conditions, disc brakes are good. However, for ROAD bikes, I agree with others,
    that disc brakes only ADD weight more weight to the bike and thus, is not necessary. Will we see it
    on future production bikes? IF people buy into it and marketing/product managers at the big
    companies THINK people will buy it, yes we will. I guess for Peter and those with shops, it may be a
    good thing as that means more things to service which most people can't do at home. The end result
    may be that Peter and other shops that learn how to service these bikes should make more money.....
     
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