Campy Ergo Rebuild Question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Mark A. Clark, Jun 14, 2004.

  1. I need to re-build the right hand lever--2000 Record 10. Can I just
    replace the "G" springs or should I replace the cam also? Anything
    else? Thanks.

    Mark
     
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  2. Jim Flom

    Jim Flom Guest

    "Mark A. Clark" wrote ...
    > I need to re-build the right hand lever--2000 Record 10. Can I just
    > replace the "G" springs or should I replace the cam also? Anything
    > else? Thanks.


    You're probably fine with just the g-springs, although some local (rbt)
    experts might say the cam is easy too. I did my g-springs recently and as
    long as you are careful with disassembly sequence you'll be fine. I found
    this website helpful:

    http://www.velonews.com/tech/rev/levers2.html

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/ergo1.html (try this first)

    JF
     
  3. In article <[email protected]s.prodigy.com>,
    Mark A. Clark <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I need to re-build the right hand lever--2000 Record 10. Can I just
    >replace the "G" springs


    If this is the first time arround just replace the G-springs and
    maybe the thumb lever return spring - it seems to wear out about
    the same time.

    --
    <a href="http://www.poohsticks.org/drew/">Home Page</a>
    Life is a terminal sexually transmitted disease.
     
  4. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 22:24:21 GMT, "Jim Flom" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >You're probably fine with just the g-springs, although some local (rbt)
    >experts might say the cam is easy too. I did my g-springs recently and as
    >long as you are careful with disassembly sequence you'll be fine. I found
    >this website helpful:


    The shift disk doesn't need to be replaced. If it did need replacing,
    you get it in your hand when you change the springs and replacing it
    would be no additional steps.
     
  5. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jun 2004 16:48:27 -0600, [email protected] (Drew
    Eckhardt) wrote:

    >If this is the first time arround just replace the G-springs and
    >maybe the thumb lever return spring - it seems to wear out about
    >the same time.


    I don't agree. I haven't replaced a return spring yet. I would
    recommend that you have a spring carrier around when changing the G
    springs. That part is most likely to be broken and is discovered
    during the spring change.
     
  6. jedi-<< I need to re-build the right hand lever--2000 Record 10. Can I just
    replace the "G" springs or should I replace the cam also? Anything
    else? >><BR><BR>

    In the 12 or so years I have been rebuilding these things, I have never seen a
    shift cam wear out. If ya talk to a 'local' MO outfit, they will say it does
    but..Just clean, lube, new shift springs. Check the spring carrier(EC-RE-111)
    for a busted post or being split. Grind the notch in the plate(EC-RE-057) flat
    so it doesn't notch the post and grind the portion of the back plastic
    cap(EC-RE-124) right above the post of the EC-RE-111.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  7. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 15 Jun 2004 13:21:57 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla
    Campagnolo ) wrote:

    >Grind the notch in the plate(EC-RE-057) flat
    >so it doesn't notch the post and grind the portion of the back plastic
    >cap(EC-RE-124) right above the post of the EC-RE-111.
    >
    >Peter Chisholm
    >Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    >1833 Pearl St.
    >Boulder, CO, 80302
    >(303)440-3535
    >http://www.vecchios.com
    >"Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"


    Rather than grinding the back plastic, why don't you grind down the
    top of the spring carrier post?
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Paul Kopit wrote:

    >> If this is the first time arround just replace the G-springs and
    >> maybe the thumb lever return spring - it seems to wear out about
    >> the same time.

    >
    > I don't agree. I haven't replaced a return spring yet. I would
    > recommend that you have a spring carrier around when changing the G
    > springs. That part is most likely to be broken and is discovered
    > during the spring change.


    I agree with you that the existing spring won't need replacing but it's
    still a good idea to have a spare one. They're easy to damage when
    refitting, on the first attempt anyway.

    ~PB
     
  9. paul-<< Rather than grinding the back plastic, why don't you grind down the
    top of the spring carrier post? >><BR><BR>

    Often the spring will be at the very top of the post. Grinding too much off may
    have the spring unwind, causing a rebuild. Back cap grind much easier, not
    mucking with the shift innards.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  10. I rebuild the levers on my two campy-equipped bikes about once every 2
    years. It's a little difficult the first time, but after that it's
    really not bad at all. I'd highly recommend doing it, as it's a ton
    cheaper than buying new levers. Also when you're done, your levers
    feel like new ones! So even if it's not needed to replace the springs
    every now and then, it's still nice to do. The first time I replaced
    the shift cam, but now I only do the springs. It's not necessary to
    replace the shift cam, but if you do your warm and fuzzy feeling when
    you're done is a little warmer and fuzzier. But that's all.

    Chances are you only need to replace the springs. Branford Bike sells
    the springs (and pretty much all of the other parts). Here is a good
    place to start on their web site:

    http://www.branfordbike.com/brake/brk02.html#item4

    As mentioned in an earlier post, the yellow jersey bike shop has a
    manual for the rebuilding process:
    http://www.yellowjersey.org/ergo1.html

    I'd also recommend buying the ergo rebuild manual (Branford bike has
    it) as it's different than the yellow jersey manual, and the first
    time you do this the more help you've got the better off you are.

    John Feinberg
    feinberj42
    (at ya-hoo)

    "Mark A. Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I need to re-build the right hand lever--2000 Record 10. Can I just
    > replace the "G" springs or should I replace the cam also? Anything
    > else? Thanks.
    >
    > Mark
     
  11. john-<< Branford Bike sells
    the springs (and pretty much all of the other parts). >><BR><BR>

    Except often they will state they have no 'parts' for older levers, like 8s
    ERGO. Many places do this stuff everyday w/o kneeling to other websites and
    what they say.

    Check out us or YellowJersey, Andy Muzi in Madison WI.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  12. dw

    dw Guest

    [email protected] (John Feinberg) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > The first time I replaced
    > the shift cam, but now I only do the springs. It's not necessary to
    > replace the shift cam, but if you do your warm and fuzzy feeling when
    > you're done is a little warmer and fuzzier. But that's all.
    >
    > Chances are you only need to replace the springs.



    Symptoms with my '96 chorus include that the right shifter has gone
    silent (no clicks as before), and I find that the system tends to
    shift to smaller rear cogs when climbing out of the saddle.

    Any thoughts on whether parts in addition to springs are needed for
    the fix?
     
  13. dvwlt-<< Symptoms with my '96 chorus include that the right shifter has gone
    silent (no clicks as before), and I find that the system tends to
    shift to smaller rear cogs when climbing out of the saddle. >><BR><BR>


    Springs for sure(2 of them) and perhaps a spring carrier(EC-RE-011). they
    sometimes split-

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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