Campy Record 10sp Cassette

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Outlook, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. Outlook

    Outlook New Member

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    Just had to replace my Campy Record 10sp Cassette and Chain. I had done about 6000km on both, but when I replaced the chain only, the familiar chain/cassete "not matching problem" resulted in not being able to retain the cassette.

    Very surprised and disappointed in only getting 6000 km out of the cassette... given the price of Record.

    Although I do ride a few climbs from time to time, I never race, and most of my riding is medium paced average 30kmh with my local riding mates.

    Anybody else had a similar experieence, and if so, what can I do to avoid it happening again?

    Anthony
     
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  2. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    The price or Record is due to titanium cogs, which are MUCH less reliable and long lasting than steel.

    Use the least expensive compatible cogset and chain, measure you chain often(12 inches...1/16 inch stretch, replace), change it when you see this. keep it clean and lubricated. Veloce cogsets ad chains work and last like those above it but are cheaper. Just a wee bit heavier is all.
     
  3. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    change your chain more often, get the less expensive steel only cassettes and get a chain measuring tool, Park and others make them they're easeir to use and more accurate than tryng to measure with tape or ruler
     
  4. Outlook

    Outlook New Member

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    Thanks guys...... I will take the advice
     
  5. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Not. The best measurement will be with a micrometer. Second best but likely the best choice is a 12" metal rule (a machinist's rule is the best). Simple error analysis shows that. There are plenty of stories in bike forums of people using chain checkers and tossing chains that haven't actually worn as much as the chain checker indicates. Chain checkers are dependent on the interbushing length coupled with the tolerance between bushings and chain rivets (Some bushings--rollers--have a lot more movement than others). Since chain wear is defined by the interrivet length, measuring the chain wear by using busings are mechanical references only adds error.
     
  6. mrowkoob

    mrowkoob New Member

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    I change using the park tool. Usually that gives me between 1000 and 1500 km from a chain.
     
  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Wow. You're not getting much out of your chains at all. Without knowing more, it'd seem you're pitching your chains awfully early.
     
  8. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    My experience shows 10s chains wear like 9s chains..If kept clean, not used by a big guy climbing all day while cross chained...you should see 3000 miles or so. Lots of Park chain Tools are pretty pessimistic. Measure a new chain and see.
     
  9. catlike

    catlike New Member

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    micrometer for measuring chain wear?. I have been using caliper before got Park tool chain checker, but using micrometer? That should be exact measurement :).
    Park tool chain checker (at least CC-3) does what it shoud- it measures chain wear. As good as caliper, just faster.
    I do change chains every 1500-2000 km, but i do ride crossed chain often. I belive it streches more than wears.
     
  10. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I meant calipers. Chains don't stretch: they wear. Chain checkers aren't accurate.
     
  11. catlike

    catlike New Member

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    If You say so. My caliper shows similar measurements as CC-3 but who am I to argue
     
  12. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Well, you didn't read very well what I read earlier re: the variations in bushing specs between various chain manufacturers. I'm ecstatic that your chain checker works so well for you. That's an immense relief. If, however, we consider the general case, i.e. the world beyond just you, chain checkers are notoriously inaccurate. I could really care less what your n=1 experiment has shown.
     
  13. catlike

    catlike New Member

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    As i wrote- who am i to argue. However, just to show that You are right- are those "variations in bushing specs between various chain manufacturers" measurable? If so- what are numbers in mm, that makes (in general) chain checkers so inacurate?
     
  14. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    You can take a brand new KMC chain out of the box, and the CC-3 will show the chain is too worn. So, it doesn't take a measurement or a value in mm to say that the CC-3 is inaccurate. Second, earlier someone said they use the Park tool and get between 1000-1500 km per chain. A person ought to be able to get at least 3000 km from a chain. Chalk another inaccuracy up to the CC-3.
     
  15. catlike

    catlike New Member

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    I have been using KMC (8-93 and 8-99) chains- they are similar if not same lenght (i dont use micrometer to measure chains) as shimanos out of box measured with CC3. And durability is similar to HG-50 chains (which are half the price of KMC). Thats what shows my n=5 experiment. I have no experience with Compagnolo nor Wiperman nor YBN chains yet, so you better base your scyntific n=100000 tales on those chains.
    As for durability- if i can get only 1500-2000 km before 1% wear- I blame crossed chain riding more than CC3 (as i wrote- i am checking chain with caliper once my CC3 shows 1% wear). Can't speak for others.
     
  16. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    I also trust the CC-3 gauge, at least on HG-93 chains, based on comparative measurements of the gauge and pin measurements with a steel rule and my experience over the last 25K miles. Alienator is technically correct that measuring pin distance with a steel rule or caliper is the direct way to measure wear, but for the HG-93 chains I use, the go/no-go gauge has proven accurate. My chains last 4-5K miles using the 0.75% side as the wear limit.

    I don't know how the bushing OD and inter-bushing spacing varies on other brands of Shimano-compatible chains, but since they are all designed to run on the same standard chainrings and cassettes, seems to me that they ought to be identical to the HG-93. I don't know the tolerances that chains are manufactured to, but if I had a new Shimano chain out of the box that failed the CC-3 gauge, I'd suspect it was defective.
     
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