Can a wireless computer drain a HRM battery...



A

Ac

Guest
Hi,

I have a run tec HRM (£18 from Lidls BUT does the job!)

Battery ran out in main unit last week after 2years. Had 2
replacements - both lasted no more than 2 days.

Contacted manufacturer and they are going to send me a
complete replacement (obv. very good service)

The only other thing that has changed is that it is now on a
bike with a Cateye cordless 2. My previous bike had a
'wired' comp.

Is it possible that there is some interaction between
the wireless comp and the HRM which is draining the
battery? This is probably totally wrong, but I was just
wondering? Can anyone with more technical knowledge cast
any light on this

Thanks in advance

--
Cheers

AC
 
T

Terry D

Guest
AC wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I have a run tec HRM (£18 from Lidls BUT does the job!)
>
> Battery ran out in main unit last week after 2years. Had 2
> replacements - both lasted no more than 2 days.
>
> Contacted manufacturer and they are going to send me a
> complete replacement (obv. very good service)
>
> The only other thing that has changed is that it is now on
> a bike with a Cateye cordless 2. My previous bike had a
> 'wired' comp.
>
> Is it possible that there is some interaction between
> the wireless comp and the HRM which is draining the
> battery? This is probably totally wrong, but I was just
> wondering? Can anyone with more technical knowledge cast
> any light on this
>
> Thanks in advance
>
>
> --
> Cheers
>
> AC
>

I see it this way, both the computer and the HRM receive
pulses of radio energy which are triggered by either a wheel
magnet or the beat of your heart. If both transmitters are
using the same frequency, then it is possible that your HRM
is actually responding to the pulses from the wheel magnet.

At this point you may wish to refer to your trusty slide
rule and confirm that at a speed of 30 kph a 700 C wheel
will be producing approximately 227 pulses per minute. Your
HRM sees this as a heart rate of 227 beats per minute which
is quite high for the average human (esp. one who shops at
Lidls) Not only is this heart rate dangerously high, it is
also sustained over long periods of time.

Being a minor robotic device, your HRM will have been
preprogrammed with the Three Laws Of Robotics so it will be
heavily influenced by the First Law which states; "A robot
may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a
human being to come to harm." [1] The HRM will be aware of
the fact that if you continue to work your heart at this
phenominal rate you will probably have a heart attack and
die. Since there is nothing that the HRM can do to prevent
this it self terminates in the hope that you might stop
exercising for as long as it takes to get the HRM
repaired and thus give your heart time to recover from
the exertion.

Possible cures:
- Revert to using a wired computer.
- Try to get the First Law repealed.
- Stop using the HRM.

Hope this helps.

Terry Duckmanton an Asimov fan from birth.

[1] Handbook of Robotics, 56th edition, 2058 A.D.
 
A

Ac

Guest
> >
>
>
> I see it this way, both the computer and the HRM receive
> pulses of radio energy which are triggered by either a
> wheel magnet or the beat of your heart. If both
> transmitters are using the same frequency, then it is
> possible that your HRM is actually responding to the
> pulses from the wheel magnet.
>
> At this point you may wish to refer to your trusty slide
> rule and confirm that at a speed of 30 kph a 700 C wheel
> will be producing approximately 227 pulses per minute.
> Your HRM sees this as a heart rate of 227 beats per minute
> which is quite high for the average human (esp. one who
> shops at Lidls) Not only is this heart rate dangerously
> high, it is also sustained over long periods of time.
>
> Being a minor robotic device, your HRM will have been
> preprogrammed with the Three Laws Of Robotics so it will
> be heavily influenced by the First Law which states; "A
> robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction,
> allow a human being to come to harm." [1] The HRM will be
> aware of the fact that if you continue to work your heart
> at this phenominal rate you will probably have a heart
> attack and
> die. Since there is nothing that the HRM can do to prevent
> this it self terminates in the hope that you might
> stop exercising for as long as it takes to get the
> HRM repaired and thus give your heart time to recover
> from the exertion.
>
> Possible cures:
> - Revert to using a wired computer.
> - Try to get the First Law repealed.
> - Stop using the HRM.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> Terry Duckmanton an Asimov fan from birth.
>
>
> [1] Handbook of Robotics, 56th edition, 2058 A.D.

Terry,

Thanks very much for your response. On the subject of units,
perhaps you have become confused as to the difference re
spoonfuls and mouthfuls as regards your medication, leading
to obviously tragic results

TO THE REST OF THE GROUP:

Is there anyone from Planet Earth who could perhaps provide
an additional reply ;)

Cheers
 
R

Robert McDonald

Guest
Well, do you see heart rates that vary with your speed even
when freewheeling downhill? If not then, no, you don't have
a problem with interference form your 'puter.

Robert the Earthperson (gotta be careful these PC days).

> Is there anyone from Planet Earth who could perhaps
> provide an additional reply ;)
 
A

Ac

Guest
"Robert McDonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Well, do you see heart rates that vary with your speed
> even when freewheeling downhill? If not then, no, you
> don't have a problem with interference form your 'puter.
>
The bike wasn't used during the time when the HRM battery
drained, guess this makes the chance of interference even
less likely (?)

Cheers