Can anyone become Pro cyclist?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Number 9, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. Number 9

    Number 9 Guest

    Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    professional cyclist?
     
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  2. Number 9 wrote:
    > Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    > professional cyclist?


    Yes! Just look at crit-pro!
    If you got someone to pay you $1 to throw your leg over the top tube
    (or a mixte, like crit-pro), your a pro. You might not make much more
    than that dollar, but you can call yourself a pro (again like crit-pro).
     
  3. routebeer

    routebeer Guest

    "Number 9" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    > professional cyclist?


    Yes, pretty much anyone can make money cycling.
     
  4. On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 23:59:45 GMT, "routebeer" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Number 9" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    >> professional cyclist?

    >
    >Yes, pretty much anyone can make money cycling.


    Make money? I thought being pro meant paying to ride. Are you sure
    about that?

    J was pro in high school -- messengering -- T



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  5. > Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    > professional cyclist?
    >

    Of course, what a ridiculous question. The euro-pros are all rejects
    from soccer. They get cut from the soccer teams and only take up cycling as
    a last resort. Look at Tyler Hamilton, he couldn't make the grade on his
    college ski team, so he took up cycling. How 'bout Greg LeMond, he wanted
    to be a freestyle skier, but wasn't good enough to win, so he did something
    easy like cycling. Look at Lance, full blown cancer, and he becomes the
    Apollo of the Tour de France. Have you ever done local group rides, and
    seen some old fart, that can't even run around the block, leading the group
    ride like some superman. The sport is full of rejects, so of course you can
    win, maybe even dominate, if you have some average athletic ability. I know
    of this 60 year old guy that dominates 1200 K ultracycling events, and they
    asked him what was harder a marathon, or a 1200 K endurance ride, and he
    said hands down, the marathon. There are thousands of examples, but in
    short, I would compare it to bowling. Once you master a few skills it's a
    piece of cake. Don't be fooled by the rbr folk, they know the score, but
    they'll try to dazzle you with misdirection.

    P.S. Throw the cigarettes away, that's the only thing I had to do, to be at
    the front.
     
  6. Number 9

    Number 9 Guest

    I like your style Callistus that made me laugh, rejects=winners. Good
    outlook.

    thanks


    "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    >> professional cyclist?
    >>

    > Of course, what a ridiculous question. The euro-pros are all rejects
    > from soccer. They get cut from the soccer teams and only take up cycling
    > as
    > a last resort. Look at Tyler Hamilton, he couldn't make the grade on his
    > college ski team, so he took up cycling. How 'bout Greg LeMond, he wanted
    > to be a freestyle skier, but wasn't good enough to win, so he did
    > something
    > easy like cycling. Look at Lance, full blown cancer, and he becomes the
    > Apollo of the Tour de France. Have you ever done local group rides, and
    > seen some old fart, that can't even run around the block, leading the
    > group
    > ride like some superman. The sport is full of rejects, so of course you
    > can
    > win, maybe even dominate, if you have some average athletic ability. I
    > know
    > of this 60 year old guy that dominates 1200 K ultracycling events, and
    > they
    > asked him what was harder a marathon, or a 1200 K endurance ride, and he
    > said hands down, the marathon. There are thousands of examples, but in
    > short, I would compare it to bowling. Once you master a few skills it's a
    > piece of cake. Don't be fooled by the rbr folk, they know the score, but
    > they'll try to dazzle you with misdirection.
    >
    > P.S. Throw the cigarettes away, that's the only thing I had to do, to be
    > at
    > the front.
    >
    >
     
  7. "Number 9" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I like your style Callistus that made me laugh, rejects=winners.
    > Good outlook.
    >


    Really, all he is saying is that cyclists are triathletes who can't run or
    swim. In that sense bicycle racing is sort of like the special olympics,
    except without all the damned hugging.

    --
    Bill Asher
     
  8. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Number 9 wrote:
    > Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    > professional cyclist?


    To answer your question seriously for a change: no. You said, "average
    ability." Quite simply, the pros breathe better than "average" people.

    But, "anyone" can train themselves to ride as long and hard as the pros
    do. They just won't be as fast.

    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall
    "You American workers haven't seen an increase in real wages since the
    1970s... But are you rioting? No. You're voting for Republican
    candidates who give people like me tax cuts. You know what? I think
    that's your way of saying 'Thank you.'" - Stephen Colbert
     
  9. Kenny

    Kenny Guest

    sure,

    I don't think it's physically that difficult to join teams like
    Flanders or Jartazi where a rider doesn't even make 1500EURO a month
    (bruto); without prize money.
    OTOH i really admire those guys' mentality. They don't have those
    giant training camps, no sunny preparation races like Qatar, they don't
    make a lot of money, hardly win a race but they keep on going.
    Ofcourse they're in an excellent possition to sell races.
    I think the mental side makes the difference wether you can become a
    pro or not.
     

  10. >
    > Really, all he is saying is that cyclists are triathletes who can't run or
    > swim. In that sense bicycle racing is sort of like the special olympics,
    > except without all the damned hugging.
    >
    > --
    > Bill Asher

    --------
    exactly, a special olympics without the hugging. Instead is what you get is
    arrogance and pomposity on a scale that is so huge that I can't even think
    of another sport where the participants even come close to those in
    pro-bicycle racing. They attack their fans (freds), and then they are
    surprised when they have none.
     
  11. Mark Fennell

    Mark Fennell Guest

    Number 9 wrote:
    > Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    > professional cyclist?


    imho, there is a common belief that a person's *physical* characteristics
    determine how far he/she can go in bike racing. That is the wrong way to
    look at it. If a rider can put in 20-30 hours a week of quality training,
    for 4-6 years in a row, I think it is possible to reach at least the bottom
    of the domestic pro level. And please don't think I'm trivializing it. Quite
    the opposite actually, the mental strength and commitment to train that hard
    is huge. It's that mental ability to train hard and smart that separates
    cyclists.

    Here's the difference in a nutshell... The lower cat wannabe sits down and
    writes up a training plan (or pays a coach to do it), but ends up riding
    less than planned because of wind, rain, wife, kids, work, beer, you get the
    idea... The pro-destined rider does the opposite, almost always sticking to
    the plan and even going further, seeking out extra hills and headwinds,
    because he knows that successful racing is all about training. imho.
     
  12. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Mark Fennell wrote:
    > Number 9 wrote:
    > > Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    > > professional cyclist?

    >
    > imho, there is a common belief that a person's *physical* characteristics
    > determine how far he/she can go in bike racing. That is the wrong way to
    > look at it. If a rider can put in 20-30 hours a week of quality training,
    > for 4-6 years in a row, I think it is possible to reach at least the bottom
    > of the domestic pro level. And please don't think I'm trivializing it. Quite
    > the opposite actually, the mental strength and commitment to train that hard
    > is huge. It's that mental ability to train hard and smart that separates
    > cyclists.
    >
    > Here's the difference in a nutshell... The lower cat wannabe sits down and
    > writes up a training plan (or pays a coach to do it), but ends up riding
    > less than planned because of wind, rain, wife, kids, work, beer, you get the
    > idea... The pro-destined rider does the opposite, almost always sticking to
    > the plan and even going further, seeking out extra hills and headwinds,
    > because he knows that successful racing is all about training. imho.


    I think there's a point you're failing to address, that being that
    those folks who have the will to train as you described do so because
    they HAVE the physical ability to benefit from the training and are
    receiving sufficient feedback to make the continued training
    worthwhile. Those without the inate physical ability will not get the
    feedback required and will not continue the training as required.

    Of course, we all know someone who has gobs of inate ability who just
    can't bring themselves to commit to the training required to truly
    excel. That's a different story, though.
     
  13. Callistus Valerius wrote:

    >>Really, all he is saying is that cyclists are triathletes who can't run or
    >>swim. In that sense bicycle racing is sort of like the special olympics,
    >>except without all the damned hugging.
    >>
    >>--
    >>Bill Asher

    >
    > --------
    > exactly, a special olympics without the hugging. Instead is what you get is
    > arrogance and pomposity on a scale that is so huge that I can't even think
    > of another sport


    How can you tell if you've been rejected from all those nicer sports?

    Steve


    where the participants even come close to those in
    > pro-bicycle racing. They attack their fans (freds), and then they are
    > surprised when they have none.
    >
    >



    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
    http://www.dentaltwins.com
    Brooklyn, NY
    718-258-5001
     
  14. Couldn't agree more.

    RVD
     
  15. D. Ferguson

    D. Ferguson Guest

    On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 22:12:48 GMT, "Number 9" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    >professional cyclist?
    >



    Of course. They just can't make a single $ doing it.
     
  16. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On 28 Feb 2006 04:01:01 GMT, William Asher <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Number 9" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I like your style Callistus that made me laugh, rejects=winners.
    >> Good outlook.
    >>

    >
    >Really, all he is saying is that cyclists are triathletes who can't run or
    >swim. In that sense bicycle racing is sort of like the special olympics,
    >except without all the damned hugging.


    Actually it is the ironman length tri that requires no talent whatever, only
    training time. Bike racing calls on some inate talent, mostly stubbornness, but
    some athletic ability.

    Ron
     

  17. > >
    > >Really, all he is saying is that cyclists are triathletes who can't run

    or
    > >swim. In that sense bicycle racing is sort of like the special olympics,
    > >except without all the damned hugging.

    >
    > Actually it is the ironman length tri that requires no talent whatever,

    only
    > training time. Bike racing calls on some inate talent, mostly

    stubbornness, but
    > some athletic ability.
    >
    > Ron


    Ironman's don't involve drafting, so you do have to have athletic
    ability. Drafting takes none, as you already know. I would say stubborn,
    in the way that they don't want to lose the draft, as then they would be
    exposed as an athletic dunce. Have you ever seen the ones that drop out of
    the peloton, for whatever reason, and they're all alone? They don't look
    like much. The only racer I've seen that tries to use his athleticism, is
    Chris Horner. And critpro called him an ASS CLOWN for daring to do
    something athletic.
     

  18. > Here's the difference in a nutshell... The lower cat wannabe sits down and
    > writes up a training plan (or pays a coach to do it), but ends up riding
    > less than planned because of wind, rain, wife, kids, work, beer, you get

    the
    > idea...


    or in another nutshell.......they have lives.
     
  19. "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >> --------

    > exactly, a special olympics without the hugging. Instead is what you get
    > is
    > arrogance and pomposity on a scale that is so huge that I can't even think
    > of another sport where the participants even come close to those in
    > pro-bicycle racing. They attack their fans (freds), and then they are
    > surprised when they have none.


    We have not heard your opinion of Kirsten Gum's breasts lately.
    >
    >
     
  20. Number 9

    Number 9 Guest

    Thanks for that serious opinion Raptor. I was referring to the "basic" Pro
    cyclist. This includes the guy that rides in the race to break the wind
    for the winner, and bring food, etc to everyone as well. I get the feeling
    you mean "top" Pros. Please revisit.

    "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Number 9 wrote:
    >> Assuming average ability, and proper training, can "anyone" become a
    >> professional cyclist?

    >
    > To answer your question seriously for a change: no. You said, "average
    > ability." Quite simply, the pros breathe better than "average" people.
    >
    > But, "anyone" can train themselves to ride as long and hard as the pros
    > do. They just won't be as fast.
    >
    > --
    > Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall
    > "You American workers haven't seen an increase in real wages since the
    > 1970s... But are you rioting? No. You're voting for Republican
    > candidates who give people like me tax cuts. You know what? I think
    > that's your way of saying 'Thank you.'" - Stephen Colbert
     
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