Can anyone explain this?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paul, Mar 13, 2003.

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  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    I had a strange thing happen today. My bike was proped against a kerb whilst I went into a shop.
    It's a pretty windy day so I wasn't too suprised to find that it had blown over (it had fallen onto
    it's right side, away from the kerb).

    What I was suprised to find was that the left front brake block (opposite side to the one on which
    the bike was lying) was wedged right under the front rim! It touch a fair amount of force pulling on
    the brake arm to pull the block out from under the rim!

    I can't work out how on earth this happened. Even if the bike fell heavily and struck the front
    brake lever as it landed (which it probably wouldn't since the right pedal would have hit the ground
    first) this wouldn't have caused enough force, it is not possible to jam the brake block under the
    rim how ever hard you compress the lever.

    With the brake block, arm pulled back into place every thing is fine, the front wheel is true and
    secure and spins between the brake blocks. The front brake works without problem.

    I appreciate that this isn't really a 'tech' question but I am intrigued to fine out what
    happened. Short of someone actually kicking the bike over hard and striking the left front brake
    arm I'm at a loss.

    I'd be interested to hear anyone's thoughts,

    Paul.
     
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  2. Paul <[email protected]> wrote:

    : What I was suprised to find was that the left front brake block (opposite side to the one on which
    : the bike was lying) was wedged right under the front rim! It touch a fair amount of force pulling
    : on the brake arm to pull the block out from under the rim!

    Consider that the brake arch itself hit the road. Remember that the front brake cable enters the
    brake from the right side and therefore has an extended boss to take the cable adjuster. I'm sure if
    you whacked it hard enough the left brake block would be forced under the rim - as happened to you.

    Reading your story made me whince!!

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  3. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Paul (cutsie-pie names) writes:

    > I had a strange thing happen today. My bike was propped against a kerb whilst I went into a shop.
    > It's a pretty windy day so I wasn't too suprised to find that it had blown over (it had fallen
    > onto it's right side, away from the kerb).

    > What I was suprised to find was that the left front brake block (opposite side to the one on which
    > the bike was lying) was wedged right under the front rim! It touch a fair amount of force pulling
    > on the brake arm to pull the block out from under the rim!

    From what you say, this nust be a cantilever brake whose protruding straddle cable attachment end
    struck the ground. This is common. Use the Braille method to detect pavement contact. Feel for
    abraded rough surfaces, then look closely when you find one. Bicycles that fall over, even when
    parked, generally have Braille marks.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  4. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi and thanks for the thoughts. The brake is actually a V brake, I'm not quite sure how these differ
    from cantilevers.

    Thanks,

    Paul.
     
  5. Paul <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Hi and thanks for the thoughts. The brake is actually a V brake, I'm not quite sure how these
    : differ from cantilevers.

    In the case of a V brake... I haven't really got much of an explanation! It may just be one of those
    bizarre synchronicities of mundane events producing an unfathomable result. Life! Who knows?

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  6. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    a. its the arabs
    b. space aliens looking to get laid.
    3. the bike shop employs a goon to wreck bikes.
    c. its the jews
    5. its tommy.
    6. Smart and tommy.
    7. walt rostow
    8. Lewis and Clark went by...
    9. replace the unit, its cursed. cursed units are in this week.
    10.Or it could be the brazilians looking for parts?
     
  7. Dave Cook

    Dave Cook Guest

    If there is some play in your front wheel (caused by loose spokes), I suppose the rim could deflect
    enough to allow the brake pad to stick as you described. More likely is that the wheel is loose in
    the fork. It would not need to be very loose to move enough for this to happen considering the type
    of force applied. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Paul (cutsie-pie names) writes:
    >
    > > I had a strange thing happen today. My bike was propped against a kerb whilst I went into a
    > > shop. It's a pretty windy day so I wasn't too suprised to find that it had blown over (it had
    > > fallen onto it's right side, away from the kerb).
    >
    > > What I was suprised to find was that the left front brake block (opposite side to the one on
    > > which the bike was lying) was wedged right under the front rim! It touch a fair amount of force
    > > pulling on the brake arm to pull the block out from under the rim!
    >
    > From what you say, this nust be a cantilever brake whose protruding straddle cable attachment end
    > struck the ground. This is common. Use the Braille method to detect pavement contact. Feel for
    > abraded rough surfaces, then look closely when you find one. Bicycles that fall over, even when
    > parked, generally have Braille marks.
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  8. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    its godzilla!!!!!!!!!
     
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