Can I learn to keep up?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Paul J, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. Paul J

    Paul J New Member

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    Went with a fast group this morning. I knew they were faster than what I'm generally used, but I find the 28-30k/hr rides pretty easy and I thought I'd just have a crack at it and see. They were averaging 37k/hr country road with no traffic or lights so it was just a continuous non stop pace. I was doing pretty good and feeling fine until about 35-40 minutes into it I just suddenly felt like I couldn't hang on anymore. It basically started to feel like I was really pushing it all of a sudden. So I just dropped off and pedalled on home maintaining an average at about 30k.

    My question is this. If I keep going with this group, will I eventually be able to extend myself and see it through to the end? Will I improve by riding with them?
     
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  2. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Yes, I'd say this is the best way to increase your speed. I'll bet it was fun too...while you lasted at any rate. I've been in pacelines like this at the start of longer club rides, and know I'll have to drop off and pay the price later to finish the ride....it's still fun.

    Depending on your tolerance for hard training, one ride a week with them ought to be plenty. I bet after about 6-8 weekly sessions, you'll be hanging on for an hour or more. Just be patient, and don't expect to see big gains every week.
     
  3. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Agreed. Hanging on with a faster group tends to push most people harder than they would go on their own. Even if you are not contributing to the pace, you get to pick up on the skills it requires to ride in a fast group.
    Once you become at all comfortable with hanging on (or before if you like), try moving up the line to take a turn at the front. That way you'll get to see how much extra effort that requires, and the others in the group will (should) appreciate it.
    When you are used to travelling at the speed of the faster group, you will find yourself in control whenever you are with a slower group as you know what you are capable of.
     
  4. Paul J

    Paul J New Member

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    Thanks dhk and EoinC. Thats the encouragement I needed. I've just moved here from the city. For a small town, the riding here is pretty serious and totally different to the city. In the city when you ride out of the city there is still alot of the city around you. Here you can ride out of town on numerous roads and just keep on riding forever.
     
  5. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Yes and yes!!!!!

    This is how I started to train seriously, going out with the older racing cyclists when I was 14. Each time you go out try and stay on for longer. One of the easiest way to stay on for longer is to practice your group riding skills, particularly following wheels and cornering in a bunch.
     
  6. firegooroo

    firegooroo New Member

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    I have to agree with all the input. Case in point, this weekend I went on a group ride, the average speed was about 26 to 30mph. I haven't been able to ride that fast on my own and on this ride it was the first time I got an opportunity to get to the front and lead for a little while. YES its hard work in the front, but it was that suffering in the front that made the experience exilerating and I can't wait to the next ride. This ride took us for about 56 miles and in over 2 hours and some minutes. WOW.
     
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