Can it be the oven ???????

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Tom Kan Pa, Jan 31, 2004.

  1. Tom Kan Pa

    Tom Kan Pa Guest

    My sister in law put six defrosted chicken thighs into one of those throwaway aluminum pans,
    poured a can of Cream of Celery soup over them. Covered them with foil and put them into a 350º
    oven. After 45 minutes, she uncovered them. It took another hour and 15 minutes, a total of two
    hours before they were done. She also said that the pork roast she did on New Year's day took a
    long longer than it should have by using the weight/temperature guideline. And in the past, other
    items put into the oven seemed to sometimes not be done when they should have been. I had given
    her one of those probe thermometers, the one where the probe goes into the meat and the
    thermometer sits on the counter. She told me that she forgot to use it on the pork, but her
    husband used it to check the oven temperature. I didn't think this type thermometer would give an
    accurate reading of the air temperature, I still think the thermostat is wrong. But, she said that
    she baked a cake, and it baked perfectly in the time and temperature that was on the box. Any
    ideas of what the problem could be?
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 31 Jan 2004 18:35:09 GMT, [email protected] (TOM KAN PA)
    wrote:

    >My sister in law put six defrosted chicken thighs into one of those throwaway aluminum pans, poured
    >a can of Cream of Celery soup over them. Covered them with foil and put them into a 350º oven.
    >After 45 minutes, she uncovered them. It took another hour and 15 minutes, a total of two hours
    >before they were done. She also said that the pork roast she did on New Year's day took a long
    >longer than it should have by using the weight/temperature guideline. And in the past, other items
    >put into the oven seemed to sometimes not be done when they should have been. I had given her one
    >of those probe thermometers, the one where the probe goes into the meat and the thermometer sits on
    >the counter. She told me that she forgot to use it on the pork, but her husband used it to check
    >the oven temperature. I didn't think this type thermometer would give an accurate reading of the
    >air temperature, I still think the thermostat is wrong. But, she said that she baked a cake, and it
    >baked perfectly in the time and temperature that was on the box.

    >Any ideas of what the problem could be?

    I think her problem is her brother-in-law.

    -sw
     
  3. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    TOM KAN PA wrote:
    > My sister in law put six defrosted chicken thighs into one of those throwaway aluminum pans,
    > poured a can of Cream of Celery soup over (snip) Any ideas of what the problem could be?

    Could it be the cream of celery soup?! (teasing) Yeah, it's the oven if it takes that long to cook
    chicken thighs. Tell her to have the element checked (if it's electric) and the gas line checked if
    it is gas.

    Jill
     
  4. Bob

    Bob Guest

    TOM KAN PA wrote:
    > My sister in law put six defrosted chicken thighs into one of those throwaway aluminum pans,
    > poured a can of Cream of Celery soup over them. Covered them with foil and put them into a 350º
    > oven. After 45 minutes, she uncovered them. It took another hour and 15 minutes, a total of two
    > hours before they were done. She also said that the pork roast she did on New Year's day took a
    > long longer than it should have by using the weight/temperature guideline. And in the past, other
    > items put into the oven seemed to sometimes not be done when they should have been. I had given
    > her one of those probe thermometers, the one where the probe goes into the meat and the
    > thermometer sits on the counter. She told me that she forgot to use it on the pork, but her
    > husband used it to check the oven temperature. I didn't think this type thermometer would give an
    > accurate reading of the air temperature, I still think the thermostat is wrong. But,
    she
    > said that she baked a cake, and it baked perfectly in the time and temperature that was on the
    > box. Any ideas of what the problem could be?

    I'd ask Emeril
     
  5. Tom

    Tom Guest

    > I think her problem is her brother-in-law.
    ____Reply Separator_____

    Thanks for this wonderful answer. This leads to another question and its answer! What part of the
    human body does the under-cooked pork roast and under-cooked chicken thighs use as an exit from the
    body when fully digested? And the answer is...........they leave through the Steve Wertz!
     
  6. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 21:11:41 GMT, Tom <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Thanks for this wonderful answer. This leads to another question and its answer! What part of the
    >human body does the under-cooked pork roast and under-cooked chicken thighs use as an exit from the
    >body when fully digested? And the answer is...........they leave through the Steve Wertz!

    What is it with these "Tom"s here in r.f.c. Are they all moroons?

    Congratulations on your second (badly formatted) post to r.f.c. What are you ... 13?

    -sw
     
  7. x-no-archive: yes

    You need to have your oven checked, probably.

    On the other hand, if the chicken thighs were just barely defrosted, and all the other
    ingredients were cold, 2 hours might not even be that far off. Most times given are for meat
    that's at room temp. A meat thermometer, used properly, will make sure you at least get the meat
    to the right internal temperature but it will not work for checking the oven; you need a special
    thermometer for that.

    Naomi D.
     
  8. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 31 Jan 2004 21:29:45 GMT, [email protected] (Naomi Darvell)
    wrote:

    >On the other hand, if the chicken thighs were just barely defrosted, and all the other ingredients
    >were cold, 2 hours might not even be that far off. Most times given are for meat that's at room
    >temp. A meat thermometer, used properly, will make sure you at least get the meat to the right
    >internal temperature but it will not work for checking the oven; you need a special thermometer
    >for that.

    [Electronic] Meat thermometers work just finefor whcking the temp of the oven (or fridge) provided
    the temerature is within the acceptable temperature range of the device.

    -sw
     
  9. Djs0302

    Djs0302 Guest

    >My sister in law put six defrosted chicken thighs into one of those throwaway aluminum pans, poured
    >a can of Cream of Celery soup over them. Covered them with foil and put them into a 350º oven.
    >After 45 minutes, she uncovered them. It took another hour and 15 minutes, a total of two hours
    >before they were done. She also said that the pork roast she did on New Year's day took a long
    >longer than it should have by using the weight/temperature guideline. And in the past, other items
    >put into the oven seemed to sometimes not be done when they should have been. I had given her one
    >of those probe thermometers, the one where the probe goes into the meat and the thermometer sits on
    >the counter. She told me that she forgot to use it on the pork, but her husband used it to check
    >the oven temperature. I didn't think this type thermometer would give an accurate reading of the
    >air temperature, I still think the thermostat is wrong. But, she said that she baked a cake, and it
    >baked perfectly in the time and temperature that was on the box. Any ideas of what the problem
    >could be?

    It could be the aluminum pans. I know whenever I bake something like Stouffer's frozen lasagna
    it's never done in the time indicated on the box. If you bake something in an lightweight
    aluminum pan and cover it with aluminum foil all that aluminum is going to reflect heat away from
    the food. Heavyweight aluminum pans however usually don't have this problem. The problem mainly
    occurs with those disposable shiny lightweight aluminum pans. Covering them with foil makes the
    problem even worse.
     
  10. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 31 Jan 2004 22:03:34 GMT, [email protected] (Naomi Darvell)
    wrote:

    >Steve Wertz wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>On 31 Jan 2004 21:29:45 GMT, [email protected] (Naomi Darvell) wrote:
    >>
    >>>On the other hand, if the chicken thighs were just barely defrosted, and all the other
    >>>ingredients were cold, 2 hours might not even be that far off.
    >>Most
    >>>times given are for meat that's at room temp. A meat thermometer, used properly, will make sure
    >>>you at least get the meat to the right internal temperature but it will not work for checking the
    >>>oven; you need a special thermometer for that.
    >>
    >>[Electronic] Meat thermometers work just finefor whcking the temp of the oven (or fridge) provided
    >>the temerature is within the acceptable temperature range of the device.

    ?? That was supposed to say "checking", not 'whcking'. Ugh.

    >Yeah, if you have a good digital one with a remote sensor.

    Not even. A regular Polder, Taylor, Pyrex, Timex or Maverick works just fine.

    -sw
     
  11. X-Archive:No

    X-Archive:No Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 21:11:41 GMT, Tom <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> I think her problem is her brother-in-law.
    >____Reply Separator_____
    <SNIP>
    >And the answer is...........they leave through the Steve Wertz!

    The story doesn't even have her brother-in-law in it. The poster mentions himself, his sister and
    her husband.
     
  12. Pennyaline

    Pennyaline Guest

    "x-archive:no" writes:
    > The story doesn't even have her brother-in-law in it. The poster mentions himself, his sister and
    > her husband.

    The post begins with "My sister in law put six defrosted chicken thighs into one of those throwaway
    aluminum pans..." which means that the poster is her brother-in-law.
     
  13. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 00:00:20 GMT, "x-archive:no"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>> I think her problem is her brother-in-law.

    >The story doesn't even have her brother-in-law in it. The poster mentions himself, his sister and
    >her husband.

    Duh - The poster *is* the brother-in-law.

    Fix that ultra-lame From: line, BTW - You didn't even spell it right. And even if you did it
    wouldn't do anything anyway.

    -sw
     
  14. On 31 Jan 2004 18:35:09 GMT, [email protected] (TOM KAN PA) wrote:

    >My sister in law put six defrosted chicken thighs into one of those throwaway aluminum pans, poured
    >a can of Cream of Celery soup over them. Covered them with foil and put them into a 350º oven.
    >After 45 minutes, she uncovered them. It took another hour and 15 minutes, a total of two hours
    >before they were done. She also said that the pork roast she did on New Year's day took a long
    >longer than it should have by using the weight/temperature guideline. And in the past, other items
    >put into the oven seemed to sometimes not be done when they should have been. I had given her one
    >of those probe thermometers, the one where the probe goes into the meat and the thermometer sits on
    >the counter. She told me that she forgot to use it on the pork, but her husband used it to check
    >the oven temperature. I didn't think this type thermometer would give an accurate reading of the
    >air temperature, I still think the thermostat is wrong. But, she said that she baked a cake, and it
    >baked perfectly in the time and temperature that was on the box. Any ideas of what the problem
    >could be?
    >
    Maybe she feels the need to check on the food often. That would increase the baking time quite a bit
    especially if she takes the foil off and everything...
     
Loading...