Can some predispositions be for balancing lifespan?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Kumar, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. Kumar

    Kumar Guest

    Hello,

    We may get many predispositions--may be due to adopting modern
    lifestyle, polluted environments or modernization etc. In short, we can
    consider these as, living in unnatural or imbalanced environment....so
    getting environmental factors in our genes.

    Due to such imbalances, we may either be increasing our lifespan or
    shortening it. In short, we may be getting imbalanced lifespan and
    imbalances in homeostatis. Our body's and nature's system might be
    trying to balance it. In such thoughts, can we guess that some
    predispositions be, to increase life span and other to reduce it. Under
    this consideration, how can we evaluate two most prevailing
    disorders--diabetes and hypertention. Cancer may be a result/outcome of
    getting such imbalances but may not be predisposed absolutely.

    Pls look at following quote and link in this regard:-

    "Insulin action: Increase of DNA replication and protein synthesis via
    control of amino acid uptake. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin "

    Excess the DNA replications, lesser can be the lifespan. Excess the
    oxidations, lesser can be the lifespan, And vice-versa.

    Under such thoughts how can you evaulate getting diabetes2 esp. when
    insulin is deficient or not working? Can it be meant to increase
    lifespan by reducing DNA replications and oxidations? Can glycation be
    meant to increase lifespan?

    These are bit deep, dynamic and serious thoughts, so your deep, logical
    and dynamic understandings are anticipated.

    Best wishes.
     
    Tags:


  2. Bryan Heit

    Bryan Heit Guest

    Lifespan is a complicated issue. Genes (predispositions), environment
    and our behavior all factor in. Exactly what results in aging isn't
    100% clear, but the major (or at least best understood) factors are:

    1) Cumulative DNA damage. This is a result of our less-then-perfect DNA
    replication enzymes. There is also a net loss of DNA in many cells, as
    they lack the expression of telomerase; an enzyme which maintains the
    ends of chromosomes.

    2) Buildup of damaged proteins/lipids/etc. Our body does have
    mechanisms in place to get rid of this stuff, but it appears that as we
    age there is a buildup of this material, and this likely interferes with
    our metabolism.

    3) Hormonal changes. Men and women both undergo hormonal changes as
    they age. This results in a variety of biological changes (bone loss,
    for example).

    4) Effects of inflammation. Inflammation (i.e. your body's response to
    infection and tissue damage) is highly damaging to your body. It
    creates large amounts of oxidized and damaged proteins, DNA, lipids,
    etc. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that this can have
    a cumulative effect, whereby people who are more often infected with
    pathogens will lead shorter lives due to the enhanced damage generated
    by the immune system.

    5) Failure of the immune system. As we age our immune system becomes
    less and less effective. For example, in humans major immune organs
    undergo atrophy by the mid to late 20's (thymus, for example).
    Likewise, the bone marrow atrophys continually after our teenage years
    (hematopoietic tissue becomes replaced by fats). As such, as we age we
    become more and more prone to infection.

    6) Dietary effect. This is a complex area. Some changes in our diet
    (better nutrition, proper vitamin intake) enhance life expectancy, while
    others (high fat & sugar intake) lower it. There is no doubt that over
    the last 100 years improvements in our food supply have dramatically
    improved, as has our life expectancy. But today's high-fat diet may be
    counteracting that. A few studies have gone so far as to suggest that
    the teenagers of today may be the first generation since the founding of
    the new world to experience a drop in life expectancy - entirely due to
    poor diet.

    7) Exercise. It's a good thing. Lifestyle. Good and bad. Things like
    smoking have a dramatically bad effect on our health and longevity. So
    does stress.

    From a research point of view, most of the work trying to make us live
    longer concentrates on DNA damage and removal of damaged/oxidized
    material. The rest of the factors are usually thing we can control -
    via proper diet, exercise and hygiene. Whether or not this research
    will ever achieve greatly enhanced lifespans isn't clear, but people are
    most certantly trying.

    Bryan
     
  3. Kumar wrote:

    > We may get many predispositions--may be due to adopting modern
    > lifestyle, polluted environments or modernization etc. In short, we can
    > consider these as, living in unnatural or imbalanced environment....so
    > getting environmental factors in our genes.
    >
    > Due to such imbalances, we may either be increasing our lifespan or
    > shortening it. In short, we may be getting imbalanced lifespan and
    > imbalances in homeostatis. Our body's and nature's system might be
    > trying to balance it. In such thoughts, can we guess that some
    > predispositions be, to increase life span and other to reduce it. Under
    > this consideration, how can we evaluate two most prevailing
    > disorders--diabetes and hypertention. Cancer may be a result/outcome of
    > getting such imbalances but may not be predisposed absolutely.
    >
    > Pls look at following quote and link in this regard:-
    >
    > "Insulin action: Increase of DNA replication and protein synthesis via
    > control of amino acid uptake. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin "
    >
    > Excess the DNA replications, lesser can be the lifespan. Excess the
    > oxidations, lesser can be the lifespan, And vice-versa.
    >
    > Under such thoughts how can you evaulate getting diabetes2 esp. when
    > insulin is deficient or not working? Can it be meant to increase
    > lifespan by reducing DNA replications and oxidations? Can glycation be
    > meant to increase lifespan?
    >
    > These are bit deep, dynamic and serious thoughts, so your deep, logical
    > and dynamic understandings are anticipated.


    This was a good question until we consider who the author is. Your
    broken English almost makes your question reasonable. IMHO, you are
    just a totally confused puppy.
     
  4. kumar

    kumar Guest

    Bryan Heit wrote:
    > Lifespan is a complicated issue. Genes (predispositions), environment
    > and our behavior all factor in. Exactly what results in aging isn't
    > 100% clear, but the major (or at least best understood) factors are:
    >
    > 1) Cumulative DNA damage. This is a result of our less-then-perfect DNA
    > replication enzymes. There is also a net loss of DNA in many cells, as
    > they lack the expression of telomerase; an enzyme which maintains the
    > ends of chromosomes.


    More insulin may mean increased anabolism and may be decreased
    catabolism.
    Can more glucose, lipids and protiens uptake by cells cause it due to
    their oxidation?

    > 2) Buildup of damaged proteins/lipids/etc. Our body does have
    > mechanisms in place to get rid of this stuff, but it appears that as we
    > age there is a buildup of this material, and this likely interferes with
    > our metabolism.


    Can slight lower oxidation of glucose and lipids and lower uptake of
    glucose, lipids and amino acids by cells result into lower builtups of
    their damaged substances?In other words, can more insulin may cause
    indirectly, these buildups?


    > 3) Hormonal changes. Men and women both undergo hormonal changes as
    > they age. This results in a variety of biological changes (bone loss,
    > for example).


    How more insulin can effect calcium and iron levels?

    > 4) Effects of inflammation. Inflammation (i.e. your body's response to
    > infection and tissue damage) is highly damaging to your body. It
    > creates large amounts of oxidized and damaged proteins, DNA, lipids,
    > etc. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that this can have
    > a cumulative effect, whereby people who are more often infected with
    > pathogens will lead shorter lives due to the enhanced damage generated
    > by the immune system.


    Whether all imbalances or move of body system towards homeostatis
    encourage inflammatory responses?

    > 5) Failure of the immune system. As we age our immune system becomes
    > less and less effective. For example, in humans major immune organs
    > undergo atrophy by the mid to late 20's (thymus, for example).
    > Likewise, the bone marrow atrophys continually after our teenage years
    > (hematopoietic tissue becomes replaced by fats). As such, as we age we
    > become more and more prone to infection.


    It is normal and natural aging process, but the best upper possible age
    under natural and healthful conditions is to be understood. What our
    interfearances can do to it, is also to be dynamically understood. To
    treat diseases is one aspect, to treat by maintaining natural body
    mechanisms and health is other aspect.
    > 6) Dietary effect. This is a complex area. Some changes in our diet
    > (better nutrition, proper vitamin intake) enhance life expectancy, while
    > others (high fat & sugar intake) lower it. There is no doubt that over
    > the last 100 years improvements in our food supply have dramatically
    > improved, as has our life expectancy. But today's high-fat diet may be
    > counteracting that. A few studies have gone so far as to suggest that
    > the teenagers of today may be the first generation since the founding of
    > the new world to experience a drop in life expectancy - entirely due to
    > poor diet.
    >
    > 7) Exercise. It's a good thing. Lifestyle. Good and bad. Things like
    > smoking have a dramatically bad effect on our health and longevity. So
    > does stress.
    >
    > From a research point of view, most of the work trying to make us live
    > longer concentrates on DNA damage and removal of damaged/oxidized
    > material. The rest of the factors are usually thing we can control -
    > via proper diet, exercise and hygiene. Whether or not this research
    > will ever achieve greatly enhanced lifespans isn't clear, but people are
    > most certantly trying.
    >
    > Bryan


    Thanks for you informative post. But we may have to evaluate our
    interferances and new introductions with maintaining normal and natural
    mechanisms in body and natural health. Under such thoughts, I am trying
    to evaluate added insulin by medications, if it can effect our normal
    and natural body's mechanisms which probably may meant to o some good.
    It looks that in case of diabetics2 with IR(which do improve by
    changing lifestyle and environment without medications), more and more
    insulin is being added to system.
     
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