Can someone please explain "USENET" to me?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by 531Aussie, Mar 3, 2006.

  1. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    what is it?

    How is it different to the rest of Cycling Forums?

    Are the Usenet people seeing something different to what I'm seeing?

    Why doesn't everyone just register like so me they don't see those crappy-looking >>>> >>> .>>> quotations? :)
     
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  2. DaveB

    DaveB Guest

    531Aussie wrote:
    > what is it?
    >
    > How is it different to the rest of Cycling Forums?
    >
    > Are the Usenet people seeing something different to what I'm seeing?
    >
    > Why doesn't everyone just register like so me they don't see those
    > crappy-looking >>>> >>> .>>> quotations? :)
    >
    >



    I'll leave this one to you Tim.

    DaveB
     
  3. Parbs

    Parbs Guest

    531Aussie trolled:
    > what is it?


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usenet

    > How is it different to the rest of Cycling Forums?
    >
    > Are the Usenet people seeing something different to what I'm seeing?


    Probably, no crappy web interface for a start.

    > Why doesn't everyone just register like so me they don't see those
    > crappy-looking >>>> >>> .>>> quotations? :)
    >

    In some cases cause we don't have web access, others cause we're grumpy
    old school geeks. Can also read off-line

    Parbs
     
  4. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    oh, I see

    thanks for the link [​IMG]
     
  5. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-03-04, DaveB (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > 531Aussie wrote:
    >> what is it?


    $20, same as in town. No wait, wrong question.

    >> How is it different to the rest of Cycling Forums?
    >>
    >> Are the Usenet people seeing something different to what I'm seeing?
    >>
    >> Why doesn't everyone just register like so me they don't see those
    >> crappy-looking >>>> >>> .>>> quotations? :)

    >
    > I'll leave this one to you Tim.


    What? Me?

    People use USENET so that they can draw colourful ascii art, because
    slrn can colorise things based on how many levels of ">>>" you have.

    --
    TimC
    -o)
    /\\ The penguins are coming...
    _\_v the penguins are coming...
     
  6. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-03-04, TimC (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > On 2006-03-04, DaveB (aka Bruce)
    > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    >> 531Aussie wrote:
    >>> How is it different to the rest of Cycling Forums?
    >>>
    >>> Are the Usenet people seeing something different to what I'm seeing?
    >>>
    >>> Why doesn't everyone just register like so me they don't see those
    >>> crappy-looking >>>> >>> .>>> quotations? :)

    >>
    >> I'll leave this one to you Tim.

    ....
    > People use USENET so that they can draw colourful ascii art, because
    > slrn can colorise things based on how many levels of ">>>" you have.


    Oh, and the interface to a.b is exactly the same as the interface to
    my other 8 subscribed groups, and I don't have to go remembering 8
    different passwords and login procedures to all these forums, and
    USENET was actually explicitly designed by talented people who thought
    and discussed the problem at hand -- that of mass non-realtime
    discussion groups. There were standards designed, and generally,
    people try to stick to them. You aren't at the whim of some random
    guy who designed some website forum software thingy, and what changes
    he wants to make.

    It has a proper discussion tree, and you can go straight to your
    unread messages. You can score (I score positively, replies direct to
    myself, up to replies to replies to replies to replies to myself, so
    that I can take part in discussions I have taken part in recently,
    before reading the rest of the groups; also, certain people get read
    before other people) or killfile with complete automated ease.

    When it isn't working, it typically isn't working for only a single
    person at a time, and even then, sometimes you get messages trickling
    in. You don't have a website or database going down being much of an
    issue.


    And finally. Retro is good. Seriously, I am on a bunch of mailing
    lists as well, full of techy linuxy types, and I don't understand why
    we use mailing lists instead of newsgroups. Newsgroups were designed
    for mass discussions of geographically separated people, email was
    designed for small discussions.

    --
    TimC
    A Chemist who falls in acid is absorbed in work.
     
  7. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 2006-03-04, TimC <[email protected]> wrote:

    <snip>

    >
    >
    > And finally. Retro is good. Seriously, I am on a bunch of mailing
    > lists as well, full of techy linuxy types, and I don't understand why
    > we use mailing lists instead of newsgroups. Newsgroups were designed


    Come on Tim, mailing lists are good. There's no french miners, no american
    box vendors, no members of obscure perpetual orders, etc. to worry
    about...:)


    --
    Humbug who HATES vi...:-( Where's my TECO ??!!!!
     
  8. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-03-04, Humbug (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > On 2006-03-04, TimC <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> And finally. Retro is good. Seriously, I am on a bunch of mailing
    >> lists as well, full of techy linuxy types, and I don't understand why
    >> we use mailing lists instead of newsgroups. Newsgroups were designed

    >
    > Come on Tim, mailing lists are good. There's no french miners, no american
    > box vendors, no members of obscure perpetual orders, etc. to worry
    > about...:)


    There's no members of obscure perpetual orders in my newsclient. <wink>

    > Humbug who HATES vi...:-( Where's my TECO ??!!!!


    TECO!? Back in my day...

    --
    TimC
    "Any sufficiently complicated C or Fortran program contains an ad hoc
    informally-specified bug-ridden slow implementation of half of Common
    Lisp." -- Greenspun's Tenth Rule of Programming
     
  9. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    531Aussie wrote:
    > what is it?
    >
    > How is it different to the rest of Cycling Forums?
    >
    > Are the Usenet people seeing something different to what I'm seeing?
    >
    > Why doesn't everyone just register like so me they don't see those
    > crappy-looking >>>> >>> .>>> quotations? :)



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usenet
     
  10. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 10:01:26 +0000, TimC wrote:

    > And finally. Retro is good. Seriously, I am on a bunch of mailing lists
    > as well, full of techy linuxy types, and I don't understand why we use
    > mailing lists instead of newsgroups.


    Most people who have a computer at work have email, very few have NNTP
    access. Stupid port 119 blocks, preventing us using elegant solutions to
    waste work time and money.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "Verbogeny is one of the pleasurettes of a creatific thinkerizer."
    - Peter da Silva
     
  11. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    Luckily some of us don't have that problem.
     
  12. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    cfsmtb said -

    > Random Data Wrote:
    >> Stupid port 119 blocks, preventing us using elegant solutions to waste
    >> work time and money.


    Luckily some of us don't have that problem.

    Is a simple unblocking available to mere workers? - would love newgroup
    access at work!

    Purely to keep up to date with <capitalism.rapacious.misc> you
    understand!

    best, Andrew
     
  13. In aus.bicycle on Sat, 04 Mar 2006 21:21:57 GMT
    Andrew Price <[email protected]> wrote:
    > cfsmtb said -
    >
    >> Random Data Wrote:
    >>> Stupid port 119 blocks, preventing us using elegant solutions to waste
    >>> work time and money.

    >
    > Luckily some of us don't have that problem.
    >
    > Is a simple unblocking available to mere workers? - would love newgroup
    > access at work!


    sure. proxytunnel.sourceforge.net

    Of course if you are using a windows computer you'll have to find
    windows software to do it. Google is your friend, try googling for
    tunneling proxy windows.

    Zebee
     
  14. Donga

    Donga Guest

    Zebee:
    >try googling for tunneling proxy windows.


    Would that get me fired?
     
  15. Jules

    Jules Guest

    >>Stupid port 119 blocks, preventing us using elegant solutions to waste
    >>work time and money.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Luckily some of us don't have that problem.


    In fact I'd wager very few people in here have that problem!
     
  16. ritcho

    ritcho New Member

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    If it's anything like my employer, it would probably breach your firm's IT policy. It could place you at risk, especially if it causes an unintended security risk. I don't know if that is even possible, but if you don't know either, it's probably best to make do with cyclingforums.

    Ritch
     
  17. In aus.bicycle on 4 Mar 2006 14:15:14 -0800
    Donga <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Zebee:
    >>try googling for tunneling proxy windows.

    >
    > Would that get me fired?


    What does the IT policy you signed say?

    Zebee
     
  18. Gemma_k

    Gemma_k Guest

    "cfsmtb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Random Data Wrote:
    >> Stupid port 119 blocks, preventing us using elegant solutions to waste
    >> work time and money.
    >>

    >
    > Luckily some of us don't have that problem.
    >

    Funny this subject came up - my work cut off news access last week - no port
    119. (after 12 years of me using news there ;-). IT weren't very helpful
    about it either!
    Another way around it is to use Google Groups as a newsreader...
     
  19. In aus.bicycle on Sun, 5 Mar 2006 10:44:37 +1030
    Gemma_k <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>

    > Funny this subject came up - my work cut off news access last week - no port
    > 119. (after 12 years of me using news there ;-). IT weren't very helpful
    > about it either!
    > Another way around it is to use Google Groups as a newsreader...


    Or use your home internet account at home of course...

    Zebee
     
  20. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-03-05, Zebee Johnstone (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > In aus.bicycle on Sun, 5 Mar 2006 10:44:37 +1030
    > Gemma_k <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>

    >> Funny this subject came up - my work cut off news access last week - no port
    >> 119. (after 12 years of me using news there ;-). IT weren't very helpful
    >> about it either!
    >> Another way around it is to use Google Groups as a newsreader...

    >
    > Or use your home internet account at home of course...


    And just ssh into home from work when you should be working :)

    --
    TimC
    #define FUZZ 0.0001 /*author: Marc Goodman in ARK*/
    float BogoSqrt(float in) { float out;
    do { out=(rand()/(float)0x7fff)-0x8000;
    } while((out*out)<in-FUZZ || (out*out)>in+FUZZ); return(out); }
     
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