Can tire blowout cause a bad wheel alignment?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jpfler, May 3, 2003.

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  1. Jpfler

    Jpfler Guest

    Had a rear wheel blowout and now the wheel is out of alignment. Do not feel any loose spokes. Is
    this possible to happen? Or could what have caused the blowout also caused out of alignment? Did not
    hit any big holes before the incident. Did have several big thump, thump, thump sensations right
    before the blowout.From one previous experience long ago I knew what was coming when I felt the
    thumps. Oh sh-t!!

    Jim
     
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  2. > Had a rear wheel blowout and now the wheel is out of alignment. Do not
    feel
    > any loose spokes. Is this possible to happen? Or could what have caused
    the
    > blowout also caused out of alignment? Did not hit any big holes before the incident. Did have
    > several big thump, thump, thump sensations right before
    the
    > blowout.From one previous experience long ago I knew what was coming when
    I
    > felt the thumps.

    The thumps you felt were probably from the tire leaving the rim and contacting the brake pads, just
    prior to the blowout. This is generally an indication of an incorrectly-installed tube, where the
    tube is pinched in between the rim and the outside of the tire. Over time the air pressure levers
    the tire up and off the rim, and blam-o!

    Because a blowout results in suddenly riding on the rim instead of the tire, it's possible to do
    some damage (knock it out of alignment a bit). Is it dented or more of an "s" curve?

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. Jpfler

    Jpfler Guest

    >--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles-answered

    >Because a blowout results in suddenly riding on the rim instead of the tire, it's possible to do
    >some damage (knock it out of alignment a bit). Is it dented or more of an "s" curve?

    No damage to the rim. Forgot to mention the blowout occurred at the valve area. If you were
    referring to the alignment of the rim in your question, it had more of an "s" curve when spinning
    it. The wheel "god" seems to have it in for me now as the rear wheel from my favorite bike is in the
    shop being rebuilt at this time.

    Jim
     
  4. > Not necessarily. True blow-outs (casing rupture) can also be preceded by noticeable 'thumps', as
    > the casing threads tear and tire shape starts to distort.

    But later evidence shows that, in all likelihood, this particular blowout was caused by a
    poorly-installed tube. The giveaway is that it happened in the valve area, where the tube is thicker
    and it's fairly easy to get it messed up there, unless you physically check to make sure the tube is
    "floating" inside the tire by pushing up on the valve.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  5. > This is the wheel god's way of telling you to learn wheel building. :)

    There's a substantial difference in skill and time needed to learn how to build a wheel, vs true
    one. I wouldn't want to discourage somebody from learning how to simply true a wheel by suggesting
    that what they really need to do is learn how to build one.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  6. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    [email protected] (Jpfler) wrote:

    > Had a rear wheel blowout and now the wheel is out of alignment. Do not feel any loose spokes. Is
    > this possible to happen? Or could what have caused the blowout also caused out of alignment?

    I don't know if we're talking about the same thing, but...

    There have been a few times I have had a tire blow off the rim forcefully enough to knock the wheel
    out of true. I would have a hard time believing it had I not observed it more than once.

    These were instances of high pressure (100-150psi) being pumped into good sized tires (28-50mm) and
    blowing out explosively-- with a sound like a gunshot-- either while being pumped up or shortly
    thereafter while just sitting. The times this has happened to me, I knew for certain that the wheels
    were running true before the tire blew off, and I could observe immediately that the wheels had been
    knocked crooked.

    It hasn't happened in a long while, so I can't really remember well enough to say whether any or all
    of the affected wheels were well-built.

    Chalo Colina
     
  7. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >>Not necessarily. True blow-outs (casing rupture) can also be preceded by noticeable 'thumps', as
    >>the casing threads tear and tire shape starts to distort.
    >
    >
    > But later evidence shows that, in all likelihood, this particular blowout was caused by a
    > poorly-installed tube. The giveaway is that it happened in the valve area, where the tube is
    > thicker and it's fairly easy to get it messed up there, unless you physically check to make sure
    > the tube is "floating" inside the tire by pushing up on the valve.

    Why do you believe that all tire blowouts are due to a poor tube installation? In these cases, your
    guess about the later evidence is incorrect, the casing blowouts did not occur at the valve. As I
    had said, in some cases before the blowout the tire was seen to be deformed, even though the bead
    was perfectly seated all the way around. After each blowout, it was seen that there was a tear
    completely through all the casing plies, frequently originating underneath the tread. The hole in
    the inner tube corresponded to the location and shape of the tear through the casing. How can a
    misaligned tube cause the casing to give out and tear under the tread?

    You shouldn't confuse a a blowout (casing rupture) with a blowoff (unseating of the tire
    form the rim).

    Mark McMaster [email protected]
     
  8. > You shouldn't confuse a a blowout (casing rupture) with a blowoff (unseating of the tire form
    > the rim).

    I don't recall the original poster ever saying the tire was damaged.

    > Why do you believe that all tire blowouts are due to a poor tube installation? In these cases,
    > your guess about the later evidence is incorrect, the casing blowouts did not occur at the valve.

    I never said *all* blowouts were caused by poor tube installation. I said-

    "This is generally an indication of an incorrectly-installed tube, where the tube is pinched in
    between the rim and the outside of the tire. Over time the air pressure levers the tire up and off
    the rim, and blam-o!"

    I don't recall any "later evidence" being introduced; perhaps my newsreader didn't pick it up?
    Blowouts can certainly be caused by a tire failure, but in my experience, which is pretty
    significant given the number of bikes I deal with, most are caused by improperly-installed tubes.
    Second place would probably go to tires damaged by road debris, third place to sidewalls worn
    through from improperly adjusted brakes, and somewhere way down the line would be a defective
    tire casing.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Mark McMaster" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > >>Not necessarily. True blow-outs (casing rupture) can also be preceded by noticeable 'thumps', as
    > >>the casing threads tear and tire shape starts to distort.
    > >
    > >
    > > But later evidence shows that, in all likelihood, this particular
    blowout
    > > was caused by a poorly-installed tube. The giveaway is that it happened
    in
    > > the valve area, where the tube is thicker and it's fairly easy to get it messed up there, unless
    > > you physically check to make sure the tube is "floating" inside the tire by pushing up on the
    > > valve.
    >
    > Why do you believe that all tire blowouts are due to a poor tube installation? In these cases,
    > your guess about the later evidence is incorrect, the casing blowouts did not occur at the valve.
    > As I had said, in some cases before the blowout the tire was seen to be deformed, even though the
    > bead was perfectly seated all the way around. After each blowout, it was seen that there was a
    > tear completely through all the casing plies, frequently originating underneath the tread. The
    > hole in the inner tube corresponded to the location and shape of the tear through the casing. How
    > can a misaligned tube cause the casing to give out and tear under the tread?
    >
    > You shouldn't confuse a a blowout (casing rupture) with a blowoff (unseating of the tire form
    > the rim).
    >
    > Mark McMaster [email protected]
     
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